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< The St. Mary's Muse. 

COMMENCEMENT NUMBER. 

Vol. X. June, 1905. No. 1. 



The Commencement of 1905: A Retrospect. 



The Commencement season has been with us and left us. Our girls 
are scattered far and wide in many places, brightening many a home, 
gladdening many a summer gathering, enjoying thoroughly many an 
hour of well-earned rest. To those who were a part of the Commence- 
ment, to those who were able, to be present and rejoice with those who 
were rejoicing then, even to those who at a distance saw the Com- 
mencement through the medium of the Raleigh press, there is little 
new for the Muse to say, and yet it is the business of The Muse to 
go over these recent scenes, to write down for those who- have not seen 
or read, toi note down for the future when the scene shall have become 
more obscure in the minds of the participants than they are to-day, to 
round out the chronicle of the year at St, Mary's with an account of 
its final scenes. We ask the patience of the majority of our readers 
with this article. If it is but vain repetition then omit it and try to 
find enough in the rest of the Muse to justify the June issue. 

For much of the article following we are indebted toi the descrip- 
tions of our kind friends of the News and Observer. They looked at 
the events from the outside, with kindly yet less prejudiced eyes than 
those within, and we thank them for an excellent account of all the 
events of the season. We begin our article by quoting from our big 
contemporary : 

"Words of prayer, hymns of praise, reading from the Book and 
splendid words of advice to the young ladies who are about to graduate 
characterized the first events of the Commencement at St. Mary's on 
Sunday. This was on the occasion of the baccalaureate sermon, deliv- 
ered by Eev. Chas. M. Niles, D.D., rector of Trinity Church, Columbia, 

Saint Mary's $ehooI library 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



S. C., who, despite a severe accident some ten days before, when he 
thrown from his horse, came to fulfill his promise and preach to 



was 



the young ladies. 

Preceding the service in the Chapel, used for a commencement for 
the first time since its enlargement, the graduating class and the mem- 
bers of the school assembled in front of the Main Building, and from 
there passed in line to and into the Chapel in couples, singing the pro- 
cessional. The scene was one of rare beauty and solemnity. The 
young ladies were all attired in white and were under the direction of 
the student marshals, attired in the regalia of their position— Miss 
Bettie Woolf, '06, of Demopolis, Ala., with the white sash of the chief 
marshal, and her assistants, Misses Jennie Murchison, of Wilmington, 
Senah Critz, of Winston, Elmer George, of New Bern, and Gertrude 
Sullivan, of Savannah, Ga., with sashes of blue. At the head of the 
Class of 1905 was the class president, Miss Margaret DuBose.^ 

There were present many visitors in the congregation to witness the 
first events of Commencement week, and these joined earnestly in the 
religious exercises of the day. The regular morning service of the 
Episcopal Church was used, and the hymns were sung with great effec- 
tiveness by the pupils of the school. Aiding in the service of the 
day were Bishop Joseph Blount Cheshire, Rev. W. T. Picard, of Jack- 
son, Rev. MeEeely DuBose, rector of St. Mary's, and Dr. Niles. The 
graduating class occupied the front seats in the Chapel. 
' Dr. Niles is a strong looking man, of large build and florid com- 
plexion. He is clean shaven and with a full head of hair, a man of 
perhaps forty-five years. In his manner he is; earnest, and while using 
no gestures he reaches the people by the very strength of his words, 
^hich seem to sweep up from his heart to find utterance. He chose for 
his text the words found in the 59th verse of the second chapter of St, 
Luke: "And Jesus increased in wisdom and stature and, in favor with 
God and man." With this as a theme he preached a sermon that was 
in reality a heart to; heart talk with the young women whom he was 
addressing. 

Beginning his sermon, Dr. Niles explained that he had come to St. 
Mary's with a written discourse for the occasion, but that the meeting 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



and mingling with the students of the school had so impressed and 
touched him that he had decided to abandon all his prepared thoughts 
and to talk from the fulness of his heart upon things which they should 
impress upon their lives. In what was almost a personal talk addressed 
to each of his young hearers, Dr. Mies sought to impress upon his 
young hearers the fact that the true education is an intermingling of 
mental, moral and. religious training, a training which should not alone 
benefit those who receive it, but should exert an influence upon all with 
whom those who have it come in contact. He dwelt upon the three 
points of excellence which Matthew Arnold claims for education in a 
church school, a school in which scholastic and religious training go 
hand in hand. That form of education makes first for a Christian life, 
one that sheds abroad its influence upon the world. The preacher paid 
tribute to Christianity and took occasion to declare that a Christian 
woman is the highest creation that God ever made and her influence can 
accomplish the greatest good of all earthly forces in making the world 
better and purer. 

The second point was that education in a religious school makes a 
gentleman or a gentle-woman. The refining influence of such an edu- 
cation softens and ennobles life, smooths the rough places, and when 
trouble and sorrows come it is the lives imbued with these attributes of 
gentleness which help others to bear the storms. 

The third point is that the school in which the education is properly 
religious is the school which produces the true scholar, for the knowl- 
edge and wisdom of the scholar is based on Christianity, which enriches 
all scholarship. 

But the theme that ran through the whole discourse, the theme with 
the personal note, urged the girls of St. Mary's to take with them 
out into' life a true religion and a true purpose, that in the days to 
come they might be a credit and not a discredit to the institution that 
nourished them, to' the parents that cherished them and to the friends 
who support them, and that their influence on the generations to come, 
an influence to be determined largely by their acts, should bring praise 
to themselves, their loved ones, and their school training. The sermon 
in its entirety was a powerful plea for right living. It was a talk from 
the heart and could but leave an impress for good on all who heard. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



We feel that written words do faint credit to Dr. Mies' sermon. The 
surest proof of its power will be seen in the impress it made on the 
memories of his congregation. Dr. Mies came to St. Mary's a stranger, 
though well known for the good work he had done in both ISTorth and 
South and for the good work he is doing in his parish at Columbia ; he 
hoped to stay over the Commencement season at the school, but on 
account of sickness left for home on Tuesday. During his visit he took 
part in the Commencement at St. Augustine's and enthused thoroughly 
in all of the St. Marys, life,. He professed great pleasure at every 
feature of his visit, but certainly nothing at St. Mary's could have made 
a deeper impression on him than the lasting impression he has made 
on the members of St. Mary's, and we shall look for his future visits 
with all the pleasant anticipation that attends the coming of a true 
friend. 

The sweet Communion Service on Commencement Sunday in the 
early morning, at which the Rector was the celebrant, and the final 
celebration on Commencement morning had no part in the public pro- 
gram but found their place in the heart and their connection to the 
thoughts which Dr. Xiles sought to impress was close. 

MONDAY. 

The dreaded examinations which mark the winding up of the regular 
school work were scheduled for the week preceding the closing and 
were finished off then, but the morning of Monday was given up to 
catching up the loose ends and straightening up the ordinary affairs of 
the relieved girls. Examinations did not seem so dreadful this spring 
as usual and almost everyone came off from them with flying colors, 
but it was a great comfort to lay aside the well-used books and to be 
able to draw a good, long free breath at St. Mary's without thought of 
the next bell. 

Monday afternoon had been given over in the program to Field Day 
Exercises, an innovation for our Commencement season, but one which 
seemed appropriate to mark the greatly revived interest in outdoor 
sports which had characterized the spring. But the day was too full 
and the weather not conducive to exertion and so, despite the efforts of 
Jean Carson, whose tireless energy had accomplished much during the 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



spring for St. Mary's athletics, the Field Day fell through. We hope 
for more favorable conditio'ns and greater success next year. 

The Art Exhibit in the Studio was open to the public throughout the 
week, but the regular time assigned it on the program was Monday 
afternoon. Says the reporter of the exhibit: 

"The art display at St. Mary's is an excellent one and shows that 
earnest work has been done and that there is much talent among the 
pupils. The teacher of this department is Miss Clara Tenner, of Bal- 
timore, whose pupils in their work pay tribute to her ability. 

The walls of the studio are covered with the work of the pupils. 
There is a collection of pencil and crayon drawings from blocks, still 
life, and casts, which is the basis of the work. The specimens of origi- 
nal conventional designs froni flowers and plants is good, these being in 
Egyptian, Grecian, Rennaissance and Saracenic forms. 

The collection of wash drawings shows clever work, that of Miss 
Susie Carter, of Asheville, especially so, her work leading up to< illustra- 
tions for magazines. The etchings of Miss Anne Archibell are cleverly 
done. In water colors there is some noticeable work, in still life, flow- 
ers, fruits, and so on. The work of Miss Emmie Drewry in water 
colors of bananas and oranges, and the pictures of various shoes by 
Misses Harriet Webster and Leonore Seay, are to be complimented, as 
is also the spendid work of Miss Serena Bailey, of Palatka, Ma., in a 
cosmos and an Arab's head. 

The certificate pupils are Misses Emmie Drewry, of Raleigh, and 
Mary Lee Robinson, of Elizabeth City. Miss Drewry has some fine 
work in tulips, poppies and wistaria from nature, while Miss Robin- 
son's unusual arrangement of geraniums is attractive. 

A section is shown of original designs in water colors. These de- 
signs are for wall paper, stained glass windows, and mossaic tiling. 
All show originality and creative force. 

A collection of landscapes by four young pupils is an attractive part 
of the exhibit. These are Patsie Smith, Anna Strong, Julia West and 
Rainsford Du Bose, and the work is a, real credit to the little folks. 

The entire exhibit is a worthy one, and it shows that this branch 

of education is ably taught at St. Mary's, and that the pupils engaging 

in it have much talent as well as an able instructress." 
3 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Monday nigkt the Junior Concert of former years had been displaced 
as the attraction by an Elocution Evening, in which the pupils of the 
Expression Department, which had been during the year under the 
charge of Miss Balfour, appeared. Miss Balfour is an elocutionist of 
no mean ability and her pupils showed markedly the effects of her 
training. Though, as the dailies state, "the pupils who took part are 
practically beginners, yet the program was given in a way that held 
the interested attention of the large audience to its close." Mildred 
Goodwin's reading and Bessie Watts' acting were especially good. 

This was the program : 

Serenade, for Piano, Stojowski 

Serena Bailey 

Courtship Under Difficulties. 

Snobbleton, Bessie Watts 

j ones Emily Carrison 

Miss Angelina Winterbottom, Nellie Durham 

Beading, Daisy's Faith 

Mildred Goodwin 

Monologue, The Silent System 

The Wife, Ella Croft 

The Husband, - - Bessie Watts 

Reverie, Op. 85, for Violin, Herrmann 

Robert Proctor 

My Uncle's Will. 

Mr. Barker Harriet Webster 

Chas. Cashmore, Jean Carson 

Florence Marigold, Rowena Lee 

TUESDAY. 

Tuesday morning the weather had become delightful and the Class 
of 1905 was able to hold its class day exercises under the most favor- 
able conditions. This exercise was a revival at St. Mary's and alto- 
gether one of the most pleasant features of the season. Though a mis- 
take in the hour caused the absence of many who would have been 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



present, in the throng that gathered in the Grove in front of the Main 
Building near the tree which the Class of '05 had adopted as their own, 
were practically all the pupils and many of the old girls, and they not 
only entered heartily into the exercises but united at their close in 
acclaim to the Class for its achievement. 

Say the dailies: "The senior class day exercises of the sixty-third 
annual commencement of St. Mary's were observed yesterday on the 
campus and were enthusiastically performed. The thirteen graduates 
carried out the program, with jolly spirit, and the class prophecy and 
speech of the giftorian were given amid loud cheers from the under- 
graduates and the audience of visitors." 

The class assembled around a platform arranged for them surround- 
ing the Class President and Secretary, who were seated in state upon it. 
At a little distance in a large semi-circle were the audience. After 
the meeting had been called to order by Margaret DuBose, class-presi- 
dent, "Carolina" was heartily sung. 

Ellen Gibson, class prophet, then very effectively read the class 
prophecy, and through the discoveries of "Feminine curiosity, which is 
immortal," the future of the class members was shown forth as mani- 
fested in the dim home of the shades. 

The Class Poem and History were left to the enjoyment of the 
readers of the annual Muse, though it is interesting to note that '05 
starting with thirty Freshmen had fifteen new members to take the 
place of those dropping out in its Sophomore year; numbered twenty- 
one in its Junior year and came to Commencement with lucky thirteen 
members. 

After the prophecy, Dorothy Hughson, class "giftorian,' took the 
stage and in her presentation of the gifts, appropriate to the presentees, 
was quite the star of the morning. The style of the presentation was 
excellent and the "hits" unusually good. Most of these lose their 
point away from the surroundings, but the doggerel of the following is 
taking : 

"The Senior Class presents to you 
This lovely phonograph. 
Hoping it may perpetuate 
Your all inspiring laugh." 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



or this 

"Mamie is so good and pure 
We scarcely dare to hope 
There's anything so pure as she 
Except that purest soap 99-100% pure. 

When the Giftorian had concluded the president of '05 in appro- 
priate words presented to the class of '06, through its president, the 
keys to the Senior Hall, emblamatic of the turning over of all the 
Senior privileges, and Bettie Woolf, president of '06, appropriately 

replied : 

"One of the prettiest sights ever seen on the campus was next on the 
program." The thirteen seniors, with their honorary members, Miss 
Katie, hound together by a dainty daisy chain, gathered around the 
tree they had adopted as the tree of '05, and, leading the audience, 
sang for the first time in public the new class song, Alma Mater, the 
recent production of Mr. Hodgson, the old and valued friend of St. 
Mary's. The song, printed in the May Muse, goes well to' the tune of 
"Fair Harvard," and we trust will make a, place for itself. After the 
school-song the class day ceremonies concluded with the singing of 
Dixie and Auld Lang Syne. 

AN UNEXPECTED PLEASURE. 

"Following the exercises of class day there was a most delightful 
event that was not on the program for commencement. 

This was the visit of four Bishops of the Episcopal Church. It was 
an unheralded event, but the young ladies of the school, leaving for 
various parts of the buildings were soon notified and gathered in the 
chapel. 

The visitors, who were here to attend exercises at St. Augustine and 
look into the methods there, were: Dr. Frederick Burgess, Bishop of 
Long Island; Dr. Edwin Lines, Bishop of Newark; Dr. David H. 
Greer, Bishop Coadjutor of New York. With these wjere Bishop 
Joseph Blount Cheshire, of this diocese. 

The four bishops were greeted by the young ladies standing as they 
entered and were introduced by Bishop Cheshire. Most happily each 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



of them addressed the students, telling them of the pleasure they had 
in meeting so splendid an assemblage of young women. Bishop Ches- 
hire, having told of the progress of the school, the visitors extended con- 
gratulations and each pressingly invited the young ladies to visit them 
at their homes." 

st. mart's alumnae. 

Tuesday afternoon was given up to the annual meeting of the Alum- 
nae Association. As this was the twenty-fifth anniversary of the organ- 
ization of the Association a special effort had been made to* have a good 
attendance, and a goodly number of both local and visiting members 
were present. 

The exercises were opened with a. special service in the chapel at half- 
past four, at which the rector welcomed the alumnse to the Commence- 
ment, and gave an account of the work done by the alumnse for the 
school, especially in the past year in connection with the rebuilding of 
the Chapel. The service was intended especially to give the members 
of the alumna? an opportunity to worship as a body in the Chapel, the 
enlargement of which had been made possible by their efforts, and for 
the formal acceptance of certain memorials lately placed in the Chapel. 

A short liturgical service followed the opening remarks of Mr. Du- 
Bose, after which Dr. Niles, the Comnienceuient preacher, spoke briefly 
on the place church memorials have in the life of the church, and their 
importance, contrasting without disparagement to the latter, the memo- 
rials of the church edifice with those of the cemetery — the former at 
once a remembrance of the past and a service for the present and 
future. 

At the conclusion of Dr. ISTiles' address, the rector in brief prayers 
blessed and accepted the memorial window of the Good Shepherd lately 
placed in the Chapel by Mrs. Nash, of ISTew Bern, in memory of her 
daughter, Mrs. Janie Ellis Rossell ; and the prayer desk and litany desk 
just given by friends in loving memory of Misses Eleanor Howard Hay- 
wood and Lula McKee Woodell, late of Raleigh. 

After the service the business meeting of the alumna? was held in the 
studio. Mrs. Iredell, the president, presided. Miss McKimmon, who 
has been the secretary-treasurer of the Association since its beginning 



10 The St. Mary's Muse. 



a quarter of a century ago, was in her place. About seventy-five mem- 
bers were present. The President, in a brief speech, submitted her 
report, showing the organization to be in excellent condition. The 
report of the Secretary-Treasurer is printed elsewhere in the Muse. 
The old officers, the president and secretary-treasurer and the vice- 
presidents, Mrs. I. McK Pittenger and F. P. Tucker, of Raleigh, Mrs. 
Bessie Leak, of Durham, and Mrs. Kate: De E. Meares, of Wlimington, 
were unanimously re-elected by a standing vote. The members of the 
class- of '05 and a number of others were admitted to membership'. 

At the conclusion of the business an informal reception was held 
and light refreshments were served. 

EVENING RECEPTION. 

In the evening the Rector's reception, in honor of the senior class to 
the junior class, the trustees, the alumnae and visitors, was held in the 
parlor. 

Miss McKimmon and Mrs. Sanborn received the guests- at the door, 
where they were ushered by the marshals- to the receiving party — the 
Rector and Mrs. DuBose and the Bishop and Mrs. Cheshire and the 
young ladies of the senior class. 

The parlor was prettily decorated with bamboo and daisies. 

Wednesday. 

Wednesday was rather in the nature of Student Day, for while the 
annual meeting of the Trustees in the afternoon is of the greatest 
moment to the school, the activity among the girls and visitors centered 
around the private student assemblies, which were not Commencement 
but merely the finals in the series of such meetings that had been held 
through the year. 

The L'Etoile German Club had transformed the parlor into- a, bower 
in the forenoon for their final Morning German given to the Tau 
Deltas. It was much as usual and as thoroughly enjoyed as usual, while 
the old girls present were especially rejoiced to again enjoy an exclu- 
sive school function, a function which loses its appropriateness and be- 
comes out of place as soon as it becomes even semi-public. Levin's 
Orchestra furnished the music for the' german. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 11 

Wednesday afternoon was the time set for the final meetings of the 
college classes and the reunions of the classes of by-gone years. We are 
unfortunately without a report from a part of these meetings, which 
should grow in importance and interest and become a prominent part 
of the Commencement exercises. 

REUNION OF THE CLASS OE 1904:. 

The Class of 1904 was well represented at this Commencement, the 
first anniversary of their graduation. An informal reunion was held 
at 6 :15 on Tuesday evening with the following members of the class 
present : Minnie Burgwyn, of Jackson ; Kittie Coleman, of Macon, Ga. ; 
Marjorie Hughson, of Morganton; Carrie Helen Moore, of Littleton; 
Margaret Stedman, Daisy Green and Virgie Eldridge, of Raleigh; 
Josephine Bowen, of Jackson; Susie Iden and May Montague, of 
Raleigh. 

It wasi decided at the meeting to try to have a full reunion of the 
class at the Commencement in 1906, and evexj second year succeeding. 
It was also' decided to 1 have each member contribute a definite amount of 
money at these meetings to be applied to a fund for a gift to St. Mary's 
to permanently represent the class. 

The Class of 1904 overflows with fraternal affection and with love 
for its alma mater. An interesting account of the Class Letter is 
printed elsewhere in this number of the Muse. 

At the meeting of the Class of 1906 Bertie Woolf was unanimously 
re-elected president. There are again thirteen prospective Seniors 
next year. 

meeting of the trustees. 

The annual meeting of the Board of Trustees, was held as usual in 
the Library at half-past three on Wednesday afternoon. Important 
business engagements kept some of the members who are especially 
active in the affairs of the school away from this meeting, but there 
was a fair attendance and important business was transacted. 

Since the last annual meeting Mr. John R. London, lay member 
from South Carolina, died, and Rev. E. IsT. Joyner, clerical trustee, 
resigned on account of removal from the diocese. To succeed them 



12 The St. Mary's Muse. 

there were elected by the recent South Carolina Council Mr. P. T. 
Hayne, of Greenville, and Rev. H. J. Mikell, of Charleston. We were 
very glad to have Mr. Hayne at the school during trie Commencement ; 
Mr. Mikell was unfortunately unable to attend. Eev. W. P. Witsell, 
of Columbia, whom we are always glad to welcome, and Mr. Hayne 
represented South Carolina at the meeting, as Bishop Capers could not 
be here. 

Bishop Horner represented Asheville and Biskop Strange East Caro- 
lina, the other trustee not being able to be present. We were very 
sorry that neither of the Bishops could remain over Commencement 
Day, but each had to hurry on to other appointments. Bishop Ches- 
hire, Dr. Marshall, Dr. Battle and Mr. Ingle were present from North 
Carolina. 

The old officers and Executive Committee were re-elected, but the 
other business transacted has not been made public. 

ANNUAL CONCERT. 

One of the most brilliant features of Commencement Week was the 
Annual Concert of the Music Department given Wednesday evening, 
the 25th, under the direction of Mr. Sanborn. The crowd was so- great 
that it filled the parlor, halls, and porch and front steps, and many 
guests were turned away unable to get a seat or even standing room. 

Two of the most attractive numbers on the program were the Tann- 
hauser March and the Good Night from jSTevin's Day in Venice, given 
by the St. Mary's Orchestra, under the direction of Miss Hull. The 
program was a varied one, offering besides the orchestral numbers, selec- 
tions for piano 1 , violin and voice, well chosen and well rendered. It is 
given in full below: 

PROGRAM. 
Paet I. 

Tannhaeuser March Wagner 

St. Mary's Orchestra 

Good Bye Sweet Day Vannah 

May Lee Montague 

Prelude in A flat Chopin 

Cad Clopton Hervey 

Here 'Neath the Trees Mendelssohn 

Winfred Ross Massev 



The St. Mary's Muse. 13 

Introduction et Polonaise, for Violin - Allen 

Magaret Rosalie DuBose 

Witches Dance MacDowell 

Katharine Macy Hampton 

The Day is Done, Vocal Quartette Carter 

Misses G. Sanborn, Durham, Cowles and Ellenwood 

Air Varie, No. 7, for Violin deBeriot 

Fanny Hines Johnson 

Aufschwung Schumann 

Katharine Leigh Winslow 

Polonaise, Op. No. 7 Wieniawski 

Nora Lawton Edmonston 

Paet II. 
Finale, from Concerto in G minor .... Mendellssohn 
Sadie Marcelline Jenkins, accompanied by Serena Bailey 

Persian Sonnett Hadley 

Margaret Longfellow Sanborn 

Waltz de Concert Wieniawski 

Mary Thornton Lassiter 
Recitative and Aria, from Beatrix .... Concone 
Mary Ellen Durham 

Andante and Scherzo, for Violin David 

Gertrude Elaine Sanborn 

Scherzo, Op. 31 - Chopin 

Caroline Mott Cowles 

Autumnal Gales Grieg 

Mrs. Marion Armstrong Weihe 

Ballade, in A flat Chopin 

Mattie Caroline Hunter 
She was but Seven, Vocal Quartette .... Hawley 

Misses Durham, G. Sanborn, Cowles and Ellwood 
Good Night, from a Day in Venice .... Nevin 

St. Mary's Orchestra 

Thursday. 

the commencement proper. 

"The sixty-third Commencement of St. Mary's was one of the most 
successful, as well as one of the most joyous, in the history of the insti- 
tution. Besides sending out thirteen young women prepared for life 
it seemed to foreshadow the approach of a new era in the history of 
the school. Bishop Joseph Blount Cheshire, in his address to the 
4 



14 The St. Mark's Muse. 



graduates, announced that the debt of $50,000 incurred in the pur- 
chase of the school property, had now been reduced to practically 
$10,000 ; and that Miss Clement, friend and former pupil of the school, 
who died in the fall of 1904, had left St. Mary's in her will a $5,000 
fund for the establishment of a scholarship, and had further devised 
to the school without limitation a residuary interest in her estate, an 
interest more considerable than the other, though the amount of course 

is not known. 

"The graduating exercises were held in the main auditorium of the 
school, and the farewell scenes were touching and pathetic. The young 
ladies composing the graduating class received scores of beautiful bou- 
quets and the platform was handsomely decorated. Rev. McNeely 
DuBose, the Rector, presided, while with him on the platform, in addi- 
tion to the graduates, were the members of the Board of Trustees.'^ 

The exercises were opened with a piano quartet, the Hungarian 
Dance of Brahms, played by Misses W. Morris, Ashe, V. Bailey and 
Kidder. Then Miss Anna Clark, the salutatorian, in a charming man- 
ner and with well-chosen words welcomed those present in the name of 
the Class of 1905. Next Miss Bessie Poe Law, the essayist, read an 
excellent composition on "Poe, the Poet," indicating conscientious, ^ ap- 
preciative and sympathetic reading of the works, of this great original 
master of verse, and showing clear conception in the interpretation of 
his poems. 

A vocal quartet, Schnecker's Evening Bells, was well rendered by 
Misses G. Sanborn, Durham, Cowles and Ellenwood, and then the 
exercises in the parlors concluded with the words of the Valedictory by 
Miss Margaret DuBose. She bade farewell in glowing phrases to, offi- 
cers, faculty, trustees and fellow students and lastly to the audience. 
She declared that the loyalty of the members of the Class of 1905 
would continue till death and that they would never forget the noble 
teachings of St. Mary's 

The final exercises and address to the graduates were held in the 
Chapel at the conclusion of the first part of the program. Following 
the old custom, after allowing the audience to change their 1 place, the 
academic procession marched from the Main Building in the usual 
order. Following the marshals came the students arranged by classes, 



The St. Mary's Muse. 15 



the graduating class coming last ; then the faculty, trustees, clergy, and 
bishop. At the Chapel doer the procession halted and the bishop 
passed between the ranks of the students and followed by the members 
of the school in reversed order passed up the aisle. 

A large vocal and instrumental choir, formed of members of the 
alumnae and students of the school, furnished music and the Proces- 
sional hymn, Ten Thousand Times Ten Thousand was sung as the 
procession filed into the Chapel. Bishop Cheshire conducted the brief 
devotions, after which the Hector presented the Diplomas and Certifi- 
cates and read the Honor Roll, a place on which is the highest distinc- 
tion, which is open to every student of the school. 

Diplomas were awarded as follows : 

THE COLLEGE CLASS OF 1905. 

Anna Barrow Clark Scotland Neck 

Rena Hoyt Clark Tarboro 

Margaret Rosalie DuBose Raleigh 

Ida Pollard Evans Warrenton, Va. 

Effie Christian Fairley Monroe 

Ellen Phif er Gibson Concord 

Florence Lawton Grant Wilmington 

Dorothy May Hughson Morganton 

Sadie Marcelline Jenkins Edisto Island, S. C. 

Bessie Poe Law Raleigh 

Mossie Elizabeth Long Rockingham 

Mary Ellis Rossell Staten Island, N. Y. 

Malinda Ray Tillinghast Morganton 

THE MUSIC SCHOOL. 

Gertrude Elaine Sanborn, Buena Vista, Va Violin 

Margaret Longfellow Sanborn, Buena Vista, Va Vocal 

Miriam A. Weihe, Raleigh Vocal 

THE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 

Margaret Elmer George New Bern 

Lily Linwood Savage Lawrence 

Alice Winston Spruill Louisburg 

Mary Davis Villepigue Camden, S. C. 

Miss DuBose, with an average of 97.86, won the first honor and was 
Valedictorian; Miss Anna Clark, average 97.78, with second honor, 
was Salutatorian. The others, with averages of more than 95% were 
Miss Jenkins, with an average of 96.87, and Miss Russell, with 95.74. 
The general average of the class was 93.46, a very creditable one. 



IQ The St. Mary's Muse. 



Certificates were awarded as follows : 

THE COLLEGE. 

Jean Moore Carson, Spartanburg, S. C. .English, Literature and History 

Isabel Means Ruff, Ridgeway, S. C English and Literature 

Marguerite Clarkson Springs, Charlotte English and Literature 

MUSIC SCHOOL. 

Margaret Rosalie DuBose, Raleigh Violin 

Nora Lawson Edmondston, Savannah, Ga Piano 

Catherine Macey Hampton, Gainesville, Fla Piano 

Caroline Clopton Hervey, Raleigh Piano 

Mattie Caroline Hunter, Warrenton Organ 

Sadie Marcelline Jenkins, Edisto Island, S. C Piano 

Mary Thornton Lassiter, Hertford Piano 

Winifred Ross Massey, West Raleigh Vocal 

Kate Leigh Winslow, Hertford Viano 

ART. 

Emmie Louise Drewry, Raleigh Drawing and Water Color 

Mary Leigh Robinson, Elizabeth City Drawing and Water Color 

STENOGRAPHY AND TYPEWRITING. 

Carrie Ellen Claytor ^T^h 

Sophy Manly Grimes wi- l 

Minnie Gertrude Grissom * aleigfc 

Eliza Washington Knox J* a elS ^ 

Emma Street Roberts ■ " aiei&i 

Mary Sherwood Smedes Raleigh 

Tlie following students were on the Honor Boll, having successfully 
completed all their studies of the year with an average of at least 90% ; 
been "Excellent" in Deportment, and in faithful attendance throughout 

the year. __ 

The Honor Roll. 1905. 

preparatory department. 
Mary Mitchell Chamberlain, West Raleigh. Eleanor Vass Mann. 

Maude Marshall Eberhardt. Henrietta Schwartz. 

COLLEGE. 

Serena Cobia Bailey. Lillian Howser Farmer. 

Virginia Empie Bailey. Nellie Fort . 

Katie Wayland Barbee. ^J*?? T\ 

Heber Corinne Birdsong. Dorothy May Hughson. 

Emily Jordan Carrison. Sadie Marcelline Jenkins. 

,, r^r-c,™ Annie Eliza Koonce. 

Jean Moore Carson. 

tt t ™„„ir Bessie Poe Law. 
Helen Clark. . . 

„„„,„„ niarir Mossie Elizabeth Long. 
Anna Barrow ClarK. 

t, tt + m„A Margaret Mackay. 

SSST5SS DuBose. Anne Elizabeth Miller. 

Ida Pollard Evans. Mary Ellis Rossell. 

Effie Christian Fairley. Malinda Ray Tillmghast. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 17 

the bishop's annual address. 

Bishop Cheshire then delivered his address to the graduating class. 
After regretting the absence of his fellow bishops and the consequent 
necessity of his bearing the speech making alone, he re-told the old 
story of the mother lark and her young ones, and continued as follows : 

"I will venture to draw from this a lesson for the class of 1905, and 
for all the pupils of the school. We should not undervalue others, nor 
neglect the help they can be to us in many ways. But after all we must 
learn to depend upon ourselves. We are wonderfully helped and 
guided and protected and influenced for good by others, but there is in 
us an element of personal freedom, responsibility, duty and upon this 
personal element we build our lives. We, perhaps, underestimate the 
influence© executed upon our lives and characters, and careers by provi- 
dential causes beyond our control. We are largely unconscious of their 
operation and control, and shape our destiny more than we know — and 
yet in spite of all this, it is also true that we are what we determine for 
ourselves. We may not be able in our philosophy to reconcile these two 
things, our personal freedom and the controlling power of Providence, 
yet we know that both are true ; and we feel in our hearts that we have 
within us the power of determining that at least our lives shall be pure 
and true and good, whether they are wordly successes or not. 

"I heard Phillips Brooks once preach a beautiful sermon on the 
words of the prophet : 'He planteth an ash, and the rain doth nourish it.' 
There are the two elements in life : God's providence and man's respon- 
sibility. 'He planteth an ash.' If the man had not planted it, it would 
not have been there. 'The rain doth nourish it' God supplies the 
rain and the great sunshine and all the other conditions of growth and 
development. 

"So I say to. you as the one lesson I have for you to-day — remem- 
ber that you have within your own power the essential character of your 
life and work. Do your part and God will supply what is needed to 
make you grow up intoi what he would have you to> be: 

"I have one or two things to say, which I am sure will be of more 
interest to this audience than any reflections or ideas of mine. Eight 
years ago the Trustees of St, Mary's School purchased the school prop- 



18 The St. Mary's Muse. 



erty for the agreed price of $50,000. We did not have the money to 
pay for it, and many wise and good men thought that we were assuming 
too great a burden by undertaking to pay such a price, I am happy 
to say that by a payment of $2,000 made yesterday, at least the check 
was to have been mailed yesterday — the debt of $50,000 has been 
reduced to $11,000, and the treasurer lacks only $110 of having 
another $1,000 to pay up on the debt, and some may safely anticipate 
the reduction of the debt to $10,000 within a few days. This is a 
result for which we are ourselves most grateful. We thank God and 
take courage. Besides, we have spent more than $20,000 in the perma- 
nent improvements and enlargement of the buildings and appliances of 
the school. Tor the accomplishment of this great result all have co- 
operated — the Rector and teachers of the school, the masters and the 
alumna. This beautiful chapel in which we are assembled, which so 
fittingly illustrates the growth and prosperity of St. Mary's, is the work 
of the alumna?. They became responsible for its cost, and they are still 
at work to complete their generous purpose. 

"I have another thing to say : The Rev. Dr. Xiles, of Trinity 
Church, Columbia, S. C, who preached the commencement sermon last 
Sunday, was so much pleased with what he saw, and feels such an 
interest in this girls' school of all the C'arolinas, that he offers as a prize 
a gold medal to be given next year to that girl who shall attain the high- 
est mark for scholarship throughout the year. 

"Most of you doubtless have heard of the munificent gift of Miss 
Eleanor Clement, late of Germantown, Pa., an old pupil and a life long 
friend of St, Mary's. She leaves to us a specific bequest of $5,000 for 
the establishment of a scholarship. This will probably be available 
after the middle of the coming school year. Miss Clement also, by her 
will, leaves to St. Mary's a certain residuary interest in her estate, the 
exact value of which can not now be stated, but which will probably be 
very much greater than the specific bequest above mentioned. 

"I once heard Bishop Atkinson say that that was the best speech — 
or the most effective, which gave facts, I claim for this address that 
it has given you some most eloquent and encouraging facts. Would 
that I might always be able to make such a commencement address as 
this !" 



The St. Mary's Muse. 19 

The Bishop concluded with prayers and the benediction, and then 
with the violin accompaniment in singing as of old as the Kecessional 
the beautiful ''Jerusalem High Tower Thy Glorious Walls," the pro- 
cession passed from the Chapel and the Commencement was a matter of 
history. 



The Salutatory and the Valedictory of the Class of 1905. 



THE SALUTATORY. . . .ANNA BARROW CLARK. 

To : day the books are closed, the' problems which confronted us dur- 
ing our senior year have been solved for us and we have assembled for 
our final class-meeting — the shortest, the saddest and the happiest — for 
just a word of greeting, a brief bit of representative work and a short 
farewell. But the sadness of parting does not at all lessen the warmth 
of the welcome with which we wish to greet you who are with us to-day. 

First, we welcome our Father in God, the Bishop of the Diocese of 
North Carolina; then the clergy and trustees and our beloved Kector 
and the faculty who have made St. Mary's for us. Then the classes, 
especially that which is to follow us, not to take our places we hope, but 
to make one of its own. Also the Sophomore, Freshman and Prepara- 
tory classes who have moved a step nearer the coveted goal of seniorhood. 
Lastly, but not at all less warmly, we welcome the visitors, the friends 
of St. Mary's, who always find a welcome here. 

In the name of the Class of 1905, I extend a hearty, cordial greeting 
to you all. 

THE VALEDICTORY. . . .MARGARET ROSALIE DUBOSE. 

As the representative of the Class of 1905 I have perhaps the hardest 
of all hard tasks to perform; the task of saying farewell to all the 
dear people and places which have become such a, part of our lives here 
at St. Mary's. And although we are saying good-bye to our school-days 
this morning, somehow we can not realize what it means, and will not 
until we have actually left St. Mary's, perhaps forever. Then only will 
we understand the sadness of parting with our friends, our school life, 
and our Alma Mater. 



20 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Among the very first of these friends we should place our father in 
the Church, our Bishop, who has made us feel that wherever we may 
be in the future, we must always have a deep and earnest love for and 
indeed consider ourselves daughters of this his (diocese) of North 
Carolina. 

In telling our Rector and Trustees good-bye, we wish them to be 
sure that St, Mary's interest will always be nearest our hearts and, 
remembering our own life here, we will use whatever influence we may 
have for St. Mary's good. 

And now to the Faculty and to each individual teacher we give our 
most grateful thanks for all they have done for us. Every month of 
our Senior year has made us realize more than ever before what the 
teachers are to the girls and what the girls can be to the teachers. If 
it is true that "we can never St. Mary's instructions forget, nor fail of 
her virtues to tell," it is on account of her loyal teachers. 

To all our schoolmates, to our nearest and dearest friends, how shall 
we say good-bye? You, yourselves, know how hard it is even to' try 
to say it 

We only ask that when we are no' longer here, you will keep for us 
a little place in your memories and in your hearts. 

And now to our own class. It is hard to realize that our life as 
classmates and roommates and Muse editors is really over, that very 
likely we will never be all together again, at any rate never all of us 
here together. 

But St, Mary's; — the Chapel, the grove, and especially the friends 
who make it what it is — will always be one of our sweetest and clearest 
memories. And now in the name of "dear old St. Mary's," with the 
voices of the girls who have been Seniors as we have been and have 
parted as we are parting, good-bye — and God bless, you. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 21 



Poe as a Poet. 



THE CLASS ESSAY OF 1905 BESSIE POE LAW. 

"Here dwelt the soul enchanted 

By melody of song; 
Here dwelt the spirit haunted 

By a demoniac throng; 
Here sang the lips elated; 

Here grief and death were sated; 
Here loved and here unmated 

Was he, so frail, so strong." 

In the history of American authors there has not been a life that 
appeals to me more strongly or a life of more pathetic interest to me 
than that of Edgar Allan Poe. Unquestionably Poe was a man of 
great genius. Among the writers of his day, he stands out distinct- 
ively as an original writer and thinker. His work holds a front place 
in American literature not because of its size, its spiritual or moral sig- 
nificance, its reality, but because of its perfect and beautiful indi- 
viduality, the purity of its composition and the distinctiveness of its 
form and art. 

"The feelings to which Poe appeals," says Minto, "are simple but 
universal, and he appeals to> them with a force that has never been sur- 
passed." 

We often hear the regret expressed that Poe did not write on sub- 
jects more cheerful and nearer ordinary life. He had too little of the 
domestic feeling in him and his thoughts were too wandering — he was 
"either in criticism or in the clouds, by turns a disciplinarian and a 
dreamer." "Poetry," says Poe, in the preface to his youthful produc- 
tions, has been with me a passion, not a purpose." Yet we all wish 
that he had written more of purpose though not less of passion. Poe 
was a dreamer and his imagination was filled with the weird and the 
mysterious ; but his mind was brilliant and his sense of form and metre 
perfect. His themes are few. Sorrow and disaster seem to be the 
main idea of his song, indeed these are the only subjects that kindled 
his imagination. Israfel, the exception, proves the rule. Of real life 
or scenery his writings contain almost no description. He paints ideas 
and fancies, not man and material things. 



22 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Some critics point to the want of moral in the poetry of Poe. These 
believe that every poet should have some kind of a moral idea which it 
is his mission to explain. ]STow the business of poetry, I take it, is to 
minister to the sense of the beautiful in the human mind. Poe be- 
lieved with Coleridge that the pleasure arising from the contempla- 
tion of beauty is keener and more elevating to the soul than that which 
springs from the contemplations of truth by the mere intellect, or even 
that which springs from any passion of the heart. Beauty, he further 
maintained to be the end and the aim of all the fine arts, but more espe^ 
cially of the crowning arts of music and poetry. A beautiful woman 
was to him the highest ideal of beauty, and the death of such a woman 
the most poetical theme in the world. This is the motive and inspira- 
tion of The Raven. 

Poe's best known poems, those upon which his fame as a poet rests, 
are: The Raven, The Bells, For Annie, Ulalume, The City by the 
Sea, The Haunted Palace and The Conqueror Worm. Of these The 
Raven is by far the most popular. The Raven is, as some one expresses 
it, "A simple tale of simple events." A bird, which some former mas- 
ter has taught to speak, is lost in a stormy night, is attracted by a 
light in a student's window and flies to it, fluttering against the pane. 
Later it flutters against the door. The midnight student, imagining it 
a visitor, opens the door and the chance word uttered by the raven 
recalls to his mind his own state of being — his dead sweetheart. This 
is a singularly beautiful poem'. While it contains no moral and has no 
particular attraction in the construction of its story, its exquisite 
choice of melodious words, its unity of plan, the wonderful vividness of 
the word-painting and the powerful appeal which is made throughout 
to 1 the world of ideality and weirdness are well-nigh faultless. Truly 
it is a "thing of beauty" and will certainly be "a joy forever." Once 
read it remains in the reader's mind, it has a music in it which 
haunts one after hearing it. 

In The Bells is found the most perfect example of Poe's powerful, 
effective use of words. In fact, I suppose this poem is the most effect- 
ing example of the kind in all poetic literature. What could be more 
beautiful, more striking, more imitative than 



The St. Mary's Muse. 23 

"The bells! — hear the bells! 
The merry wedding bells! 
The little silver bells! 
How fairy-like a melody there swells 
From the silver tinkling cells 
Of the bells, bells, bells, 
Of the bells!" 

And of all the poems I have ever read, Annabel Lee is to me the 
most exquisitely pathetic. Poe's wife, whom he loved tenderly, is said 
to have furnished him the inspiration for this work, and surely no one 
who accuses the author of having been void of love for heaven and his 
Creator, can deny the holy purity and divine appeal in his mention of 
the "kindred angels" and heavenly "Father" of his devoted wife, 

Poe's genius has never received the recognition in America that it 
has abroad. By his intellectual powers he seems to have appealed to 
the French reading public with especial force. They were the first for- 
eigners to discover Poe's great genius and the fact alone that Dore has 
put all his great talents into* the illustration of The Raven, verse by 
verse, shows the appreciation of his nation for that genius which, after 
more than half a century, shows no sign of waning brilliance. The 
German and English, too, have always appreciated Poe far more than 
his own countrymen. This lack of admiration is, perhaps, due to the 
fact, as some one tells us, "that there are more people; in the world who 
can comprehend common-place than original and startling genius when 
first presented to them." Then the fact that between 1890 and 1895 
there were made at least ten translations of Peo's works into various 
foreign languages, is another splendid tribute to the writer's novel 
genius, his striking originality, which has scarcely been equalled in 
literary history; and to his marvellous, inimitable charm of manner 
which appeals not to one alone! but to all. 

Whatever is said, Poe remains a master of fantastic and melancholy 
verse. He established this mastery and the increasing recognition of 
the fact is shown in the widening acceptance and growing popularity of 
his poems — poems, some of which can not be defended even if one 
chooses to attack them. In the words of our North Carolina poet — 

"Fate that then denied him 
And envy that decried him 
And malice that belied him 
Have cenotaphed his name." 



24 The St. Mary's Muse. 



The Concluding Social Events of the School Year. 



THE KAPPA DELTA BANQUET. 

One of the many delightful social events of the season was the 
Annual Banquet of the Phi Delta Chapter of the Kappa Delta Frater- 
nity, given the evening of May 13th. 

Mr. Sanborn's room was converted into a "bower 1 of green and white — 
the Fraternity colors. The table was tastefully decorated, the beauti- 
ful candelabra all alight, and the small candles around the center pieces 
of palms and smilax — showed the color scheme carried out — in the green 
and white ribbons draped from the chandelier to each place and attached 
to 1 the place card and menu. Brides roses — the Fraternity flower — 
were at each place, and the long green boxes tied to each guest's chair, 
proved to be dainty white silk parasols, given in souvenir of the occa- 
sion. The menu was an elaborate one, served by Dughi, the caterer, 
and music was given throughout the evening by the Levin Orchestra. 
Miss Hull, as toastmistress, called on the guests and some few of the 
Kappa Delta's for impromptu toasts Those in attendance were : Misses 
Alice Spruill, Isabel Ruff, Christine Klingensmith, Kate Glazebrook, 
Gertrude Winston, Mary Robinson, Ellen Gibson, Dorothy Hughson, 
Emmie Drewry, Jean Carson, Bettie Woolf, Virginia Glazebrook, Sue 
Prince, Helen Strange, Marguerite Springs, Fannie Hines Johnson, 
Josephine Boylan, Loula McDonald, Lottie Sharp,, Susie Carter, Blan- 
dina Springs, Jane Iredell Green, Maria Webb, Elmer George, Char- 
lotte Kendall Hull, Ann Gifford, from Fortress Monroe, Va., and 
Sumpter Thomas, Columbia, Si C. 



GAMMA BETA SIGMA. 



The annual banquet of the. Gamma, Beta Sigma Sorority was held in 
the French Room on the Tuesday evening of Cbnunencement week. 
Covers were laid for twenty and several old members of the sorority 



were among the guests. 



The room was tastefully decorated with daisies and ferns, the general 
color-scheme being yellow and green. The banquet was served by 



The St. Mary's Muse. 25 

Dugki. At its conclusion Miss Rena Clark, toastniaster, proposed a 
number of toasts, which, were responded to heartily. The souvenirs of 
the evening were alligator card cases with the emblem of the Sorority 
forming the clasps. 



THE UPSILON DELTA BANQUET. 

On Monday evening of Co^mmencement week, after the entertain- 
ment given by the students of Elocution, a beautiful banquet was given 
by the Upsilon Delta Sorority. The color scheme was red and gold, 
artistically developed, the heart of it being a mass of glowing, gorgeous 
poppies, which formed the center-piece. The lights were crimson 
candles with yellow chrysanthemum shades; each menu card was a 
poppy painted on leather and tied with a golden cord, while the souve- 
nirs were steins, the design being crimson poppies on a yellow ground 
with the badge of the Sosority in red and gold. The refreshments, 
which were under the auspices of St. Mary's Guild of the Good Shep- 
herd Church, were in eight courses and were most daintily served. 
The menu cards and the design for the steins were the work of a mem- 
ber of the Sorority and gave evidence of artistic taste and ability. 
There were twenty-five covers, and among the out-of-town guests were 
Mrs, Jenkins (Sadie's mother), from Edisto Island, S. C. ; Miss 
Marjorie Hughson, from Morganton, 1ST. C, and Miss Rebecca Cush- 
man, from Asheville. Miss Hughson was toast-master. The toasts 
were varied in sentiment and handling and were responded to as 
follows : 

Brothers: — Miss Barnwell. 

Laugh and Grow Eat — Miss Spruill. 

Fainting — Miss Edmondstone. 

Music — Miss DuBose. 

Mathematics — Miss Lassiter. 

The South — Miss Mclvimmon. 

Boys — . 

Hen Parties — Miss Gibson. 

First Short Clothes — Miss Croft. 

Daughters — Mrs. Jenkins. 

Farewell — Miss Rossell 



26 The St. Mary's Muse, 

sexior entertainments. 

• 

May 17th at 8 o'clock the Senior Class was entertained by Miss 
Jones, and a very pleasant evening was spent. The Faculty sitting 
room was decorated with reel roses, the class flower. A Literary Ro- 
mance was the game, a story told by supplying titles of books, whose 
authors were given, in the blanks of a suggested love story. Josephine 
Bowen won the first prize and Sadie Jenkins the booby. The evening 
closed happily after the serving of dainty refreshments. 

The series of Senior entertainments was brought to a close on the 
20th of May, when Miss McKimmon, the honorary member of the Class 
of 1905, gave a final reception in their honor. At the game played was 
one in which the names of Southern authors were to be supplied in a 
poem. The sitting room.' was appropriately decorated in Confederate 
flags, red and white roses. The game was enjoyed greatly, and re- 
quired rather more thinking than similar ones, but Ellen Gibson suc- 
ceeded in getting them all, and so carried off the prize. After the 
serving of delicious refreshments, all rose and with hands joined sang 
u 01d Lang Syne" with much fervor. 



With the Rector and His Family. 



May or June is the date for the Church Councils as well as the 
Commencement season and it is the pleasant duty of the Rector of St. 
Mary's to be present at these assemblies to report the progress of the 
school. 

The week before school closed Mr. DuBose was in Charlotte in 
attendance at the North Carolina, Council, and the final exercises at St. 
Mary's were scarcely over before he was off for Wilmington to the 
Council of East Carolina. After the Council he stopped for a day 
with Mr. Short, Marguerite's father, at their beautiful home at Lake 
Waccamaw, and from there went by way of Florence to spend a few 
days in Charleston. He preached in St. Michael's, Charleston, on 
June 4 and came back to Raleigh by way of Sumter, reaching the school 
June 8th. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 27 



Meantime, on the 31st, Mrs. DuBose, Margaret and the children, 
left for Waynesville, where they spent several days delightfully in the 
mountains and then returned to Asheville. Mrs. DuBose, with the 
"Saints" and "Raney," came hack to St, Mary's on the 11th, while 
Margaret and MclSTeely will continue their visit in Asheville. 

The Rector left again on the 15th for Greensboro 1 , where he was 
present at the great Educational Rally Day of the Carolina Teachers' 
Association, and then passed on to' Asheville for the Asheville Council. 
From there he goes to Sewanee to he present at the meeting of the 
Trustees, of whom he is one. On his way hack he will touch at various 
points in Western North Carolina and South Carolina and then return 
to the school. 

Flans for the latter part of the summer are not yet settled. 



With the Faculty. 



In the June Muse a year ago we said, "It is always with keen regret 
and genuine feeling that we say good-bye to a faithful teacher. This 
season the changes at St. Mary's are more numerous and important 
than usual, and the going will be remembered in love long after the 
coining have become our friends." It is a matter for regret that the 
latter as well as the former part of this statement is as true now as it 
was a year ago. 

Chief among the changes is the departure of Miss Checkley, a 
change that will be felt in many departments and by many individuals. 
Miss Checkley has been at St. Mary's since the second year of Rector 
Bratton and has always taken a prominent part in the affairs of the 
school. She has been especially strong in her interest in the student 
life and in the literary societies especially at the season of preparation 
for the joint debates ; in the Library, where she has ever been ready with 
helpful direction and suggestion ; in the Sorority life, which she practi- 
cally instituted and has had the greatest part in developing, and in the 
private life of the individual pupil she has been a prominent factor. 
Hallow'een will hardly seem Hallow'een without Miss Checkley, for 
that evening was hers and we all could ever be sure that some interesting 



28 The St. Mary's Muse. 



surprise was in store for us that night, The Sunday evening talks, at 
which Miss Checkley was the providing genius, will linger long in the 
minds and hearts of the girls who listened to her so attentively. Miss 
Checkley has not yet definitely decided upon her plans, but will 
either take charge of the work in history at the Danville Female 
Institute, Kaldolpk-Macon Institute, Danville, Va., the girls' prepara- 
tory school for girls of the flourishing Kandolph-Macon system of 
schools, or will work with Bishop Knight in his new field in Cuba, 
where her home has been for many years and with the conditions of 
which she is thoroughly acquainted. We wish her continued success 
and much happiness wherever she is. 

Miss Checkley' s department of History will be readjusted and put in 
charge of Mr. Stone, who for the past two years has had the English and 
Literature. Mr. Stone is now in Greensboro* with his family for the 
summer, but will be back at his post when the new term starts, and 
hopes to be in a new house nearer the school grounds. 

Miss Shipp, who returned to St. Mary's a year ago* after a number of 
years absence, and who has been working with Mr. Stone the past year 
in the department of English and Literature, sailed June 3 with a 
party of girls for a European tour. On her return early in September 
for a new session she will assume charge of her old department of 
Mathematics in succession to Miss Jones, who* studied her mathematics 
herself under Miss Shipp's instruction. 

Miss Joneis, who has been at St. Mary's so long that it seems her 
home, will leave the school for the third time next year, since she came 
to' it as a pupil in 1893. Graduating in '96 she was away only one year 
before being called back to take charge of the Mathematics on Miss 
Shipp's withdrawal. Again in 1901 she left for a. year at Chapel Hill 
at the University, during which time Miss: Thomas had charge of the 
mathematics. At the end of the year Miss Jones resumed her work 
and has continued in it since. She leaves now for a year at Teachers' 
College, Columbia University, New York City, and the Board showed its 
appreciation of her services by placing her on leave for that period. 
Miss Jones has been unusually successful in her teaching, and raider 
her the course in mathematics hasi been placed on a very high standard 



The St. Mary's Muse. 29 



at St. Mary's, a standard which it is hoped to maintain. She has 
made the mystic ways of algebra and geometry plain for many an unfor- 
tunate who entered them in fear and trembling, and while her influ- 
ence: is a, silent one it is always a, power for the right. 

To succeed Miss Shipp in English Miss Thomas comes back to us 
after a year away from St. Mary's at Greenville Female College, S. C. 
She will have: the work in Literature' and divide the English with Mr. 
Stone. What the Muse said of Miss Thomas a year ago is as true 
to-day, ''With her an important part of Sit. Mary's seems to be missing. 
Throughout the years of her teaching she has been not only successively 
and always successfully director of the work in Mathematics, English 
and Literature, but a power for good in every department of the school 
life and a real friend to every one with whom she is thrown. Her 
influence which for four years has pervaded the school will last, and the 
standard for which she worked will be our standard for years to come. 
We wish her every success in her new field, knowing full well what a 
blessing she will be wherever she goes." Miss Thomas expects to spend 
July and August at the summer school of Columbia University in 
study. 

Mile. Gerber retires this year from the chair of French, which she 
has held for three years. She has had a long and very successful career 
in teaching in the best schools and has shown herself strong both as 
teacher and disciplinarian. She is spending the summer at her home in 
Baltimore and has not yet decided upon her future course. Mile. Eeu- 
belt, who was chosen to succeed Mile. Gerber, has relinquished the posi- 
tion on account of her health and her successor has not yet been 
appointed. 

Mr. Cruikshank continues another year in charge of the Latin and 
Science and will also have charge of the Library. 

The Music Faculty continues next year almost unchanged. Miss 
Laxton retires and will probably return to the Conservatory of Cincin- 
nati, from which she came to St, Mary's a. year ago. She proved her- 
self while with us a faithful and capable teacher and we feel sure has 
a bright future before her. Her successor at St, Mary's has not yet 
been chosen. 



30 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Tit© other members of the music faculty are resting this summer — 
the Sanborns enjoying their home life at Buena Vista, Va., Miss Dowd 
at her home in West Raleigh, Miss Hull in Ottawa, 111., and Miss 
Pixley at Winnsboro', S. C. 

Miss Balfour will be succeeded in the Department of Elocution by 
Miss Yanita Cribbs, of Tuscaloosa, Ala., who comes highly recom- 
mended for the work. Miss Balfour is now in New York making her 
arrangements for next winter, when she will either again connect her- 
self with a Lyceum or go regularly on the stage. We wish her success 
whichever is her final choice. 

Miss Fenner, of the Art Department, went almost directly from St. 
Mary's to New York, where she is visiting the Pratt and Cooper Insti- 
tute Art Exhibits. She reports a delightful time and is taking lessons 
while there, and we may be sure she is storing up notes, ideas and 
enthusiasm for her next year's work. 

Both Miss Lee and Miss Sutton, of the Business Department, will 
spend most of their vacations in Raleigh, and will have charge of their 
old work in the fall. 

In the Preparatory work Miss Katie will of course be found again 
in her place in the school room, and will have charge of the Primary 
pupils, while Miss Bowen will be succeeded in the suVprepa.ra.tory 
school by Miss Louise Pittenger, of Raleigh, a graduate of St. Mary's 
and a former teacher here, though more recently of the Raleigh graded 
schools. Miss Bowen is now at her home in Jackson, where she will 
spend most of the summer. She has not yet completed her arrange- 
ments for the fall, but will be a decided addition to whatever work she 
undertakes. Her two years at St. Mary's have been marked by the 
most faithful performance of duty and the pride and pains that she 
took in her work were rewarded by the universal love of her pupils. 

In the administrative duties there will be no changes. Mrs. Seay, 
whose work as housekeeper is almost as exacting in summer as during 
the school year, will be at St. Mary's except for a part of July, when 
she goes to her family in Charlotte. Miss Walton, of the Infirmary, 
is resting at her home in Morgan ton ; Miss Anne is on her annual tour 
beginning at Durham. 

We have been enabled to give those who care a brief peep at the sum- 



The St. Mary's Muse. 31 

mer of each member of the Faculty. We regret deeply that when Sep- 
tember rolls around so many familiar faces will be missing. Of those 
'missing ones especially do we think as we conclude this article, and the 
Muse wishes them one and all "bon voyage." 



Notes. 

Elmer George was called home during the finals by the illness of her 
mother. Her post as marshal was taken by Isabel Huff, of Ridgeway. 
We were very sorry to have Elmer leave us. 

Sadie Jenkins, with her mother, went directly from our Commence- 
ment to' New York City, taking the sea trip from Norfolk for a little 
study at the Virgil Pianoi School, and then take the examination for the 
Virgil Certificate. We have no doubt of her success. 

St. Mary' Si had part in more than one way in the recent successful 
commencement at Chapel Hill. As always, St. Mary's girls were very 
distinctly in evidence at the germans and in the social life of the week, 
but one of the prominent graduates completing the course with honor 
was Miss Julia Hamlet Harris, of Raleigh, who graduated; at St. Mary's 
in 1903 and has since been at the State University. We sincerely con- 
gratulate Miss Harris on the successful completion of her course and 
wish her much success in her career as a teacher. 

Miss Shipp's party sailed from Boston on the Romania June 3d. 
They hope to land in Gibraltar June 13th. After visiting some of the 
principal cities, Cadiz, Seville, Cordova and Grenada, they go to Italy, 
where they will spend about a month. Then on to Austria, Switzer- 
land, Germany, Paris, then across to London and Oxford. The 
itinerary is a most interesting one and Miss Shipp will no doubt make 
a delightful chaperone, as she has traveled extensively and is thoroughly 
familiar with places and subjects of interest. The touring party con- 
sists of Misses May and Sudie Johnson, of Raleigh ; Annie Wilson and 
Rebecca Chambers, of Charlotte; Mary Ella Cannon, of Concord; 
Mary Howard and Leila Philips, of Tarboro. Three of these, May 
and Sudie Johnson and Leila Philips, are old St. Mary's girls. The 
Muse wishes the party bon voyage and a happy summer. 



ary s muse. 



Subscription, One Year. = = = = One Dollar. 

Single Copies, = = = = = Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, 
JST. C, in the interest of the students and Alumnae, under the editorial management of the 
Senior Class. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 

Correspondence from friends solicited. ealeish, n. c. 



Application made at the post-office at Raleigh, for admission to the mail as second-class matter 

Editorial. 



The catalogue for 1905-06 is out and a copy will be sent yon on 
request. 



There are still a few numbers of the annual Muse at the school. 
The price is $1.50. 



The school will issue about the middle of July a bulletin containing 
a. detailed description of the courses and classes and a copy of the sched- 
ule for the next year. A copy will be sent you if you wish it. 



The Muse will be glad to present to its friends on request copies of 
the half-tone portraits of Mrs. Iredell and Mrs. Bratton, or of any of 
the new illustrations printed in the catalogue'. 



With this Commencement niunber begins the tenth volums of the 
Muse and its second year under present conditions. The Class of 1905, 
after a year of faithful struggling, has laid down the reins and rests 
on the achievements of the last eight numbers, and the Class of 1906 
waits eager to assume its responsibilities with the October number. 
Meantime it falls to the lot of the vacation editor to get out the present 
June and the September issues. There has been help in abundance 
this month, though press of other duties has delayed the publication, 
and thanks are especially due to Miss Means for her account of the 



The St. Mary's Muse. 33 

1904 letter. The St. Mary's Guild correspondents seem, to be on vaca- 
tion, though we trust the Guilds themselves are not slumbering. We 
would ask now that all the friends who' can will bear the Muse in mind 
through the summer, will write and send in items of interest, will take 
an idle hour for the discussion of some matter concerning the life of 
St. Mary's, will make some suggestions for the improvement of The 
Muse. 

The past year has accomplished about all that could be expected, 
though far from what we could wish. The Muse has been what it 
claims to' be — the school newspaper — and nothing more. It will still 
try to be only that, but yet to be always better. St, Mary's is large 
enough and has enough interested alumnae and friends to make a news- 
paper both desirable and practical. Under 1 the latter head comes the 
old question of money. The Muse as yet is not self-supporting. It 
must be made so the coming year or its life is limited. Five hundred 
copies go out each month to alumnae and friends, most of whom cer- 
tainly desire to have the paper succeed. Two- hundred subscribers have 
not yet been enrolled the past year. A dollar means little to- most of 
the people to whom the Muse is sent, but each dollar helps a little 
towards supporting the paper. Once more we ask for support. In this 
issue is enclosed a, subscription blank. We have scant hope of many 
of these being used, but if you will make it a point to use yours and to 
stir up your neighbor whose intentions are of the best but who is a 
little slow in acting, you will be acting very effectively for the Muse. 



Lost! Strayed! or Stolen ! 



A manuscript of great value, contained in a large envelope bearing 
many United States postage stamps. Finder please return to St, 
Mary's. 

Reward : The heartfelt gratitude of the Class of '04. 



The Class-Letter of the Class of '04 is lost, and, apparently, it is 
strayed, but — unless Uncle Sam is to blame for the disappearance — it 
is probably not stolen, for strange as it may seem, the inestimable worth 
of this document (in the eyes of the class) is not fully shared by the 



34 The St. Mary's Muse. 



rest of the world. Therefore, its description and history up to the 
present date are given here for the benefit of the public. 

During Commencement week, in May, 1904, at a function where all 
the members of the graduating class — regulars and associates — were 
alone together for the last time, the President set forth a plan by means 
of which the girls could keep in communication with each other, no 
matter how scattered over the face of the earth the class might become in 
the future. The movement was unanimously carried, and rules estab- 
lished to insure the complete adaptation of the plan to the needs 
of "04." 

Accordingly, on July 1st, 1904, the member whose name stood first 
in alphabetical order on the Class-roll, wrote a letter to her "Dear 
Class," telling of her experiences since May 26th; her present occupa- 
tions; and her plans for the future. She sent this to the second girl 
on the roll, whoi read it, wrote a like account of herself, and forwarded 
both epistles to the address of the third member, etc. The letter could 
be kept no longer than two weeks, on pain of a fine, to be handed over 
to the Treasurer of the Class. 

At the time of its loss, the letter had been just once to each member 
in the class — not one had to pay the fine — and until the final catas- 
trophe the plan worked very smoothly, and proved a perfect success. 
Such a complete epistle not only gave the girls detailed news of each 
other, but added a delightful impression of the personality of each, 
so that at the end of each letter it seemed as if the reader had just 
turned away from "heart-to-heart-talks" with "Kittie" or "Ann" or 
"Margaret," and — all of them. 

The letter has given so much pleasure to the Class that its loss is not 
allowed to dampen the enthusiasm which has attended its onward 
course from last July until now, and a, new one has been started, and 
this time there are so many more months to give an account of, and 
what will be written is so much more to be treasured by reason of the 
sad fate of the original Class-Letter of the Class of '04, that this new 
one may be worthy of traveling by express, at least, 

However it may come, I for one, sincerely hope that no accident will 
ever again prevent its safe and swift journeyings, and that it will 
always pass without delaying experiences down the roll to an anxiously 
waiting — -^-> "^* 



Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 

President, - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 
("Mrs. M. T. Leak, Durham. 

Vice-Presidents, \ ^ r f- £ *J. Pittenger, Raleigh, 
' ] Mrs. F. P. Tucker, Raleigh, 
(.Mrs. Kate de R. Meares, Wilmington. 
Sec.-Treas., - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 



A Sketch of the St. Mary's Alumnae Association, 1889-1905. 



(The annual report of Miss McKimmon, Secretary-Treasurer, submitted at 
the regular meeting, May 23, 1905, being the twenty-fifth anniversary of the 
organization of the Association.) 

In the late spring of 1880, Mrs. K. de R. Meares, then Lady Superin- 
tendent of St, Mary's, asked all St. Mary's girls in Ealeigh to meet her 
in Christ Church Chapel. Quite a number responded and during the 
meeting St. Mary's Alumnae Association was organized, having for its 
first work the founding of a scholarship at St, Mary's in memory of 
Rev. Aldert Smedes. Rev. Bennett Smedes, then Rector of St. Mary's, 
made to the Association the liberal offer of a scholarship at $2,500, giv- 
ing for this the full advantages of the school. 

For the first years of its existence the Association, yielding to the 
pressing need among the daughters of former pupils, kept a girl at 
St. Mary's, paying annually, with the generous permission of Dr. Ben- 
nett Smedes, only the proceeds from the dues paid by the members. 

During the presidency of Mrs. Edward Trapier the Association de- 
cided to put into a Savings Bank all money accruing from gifts, dues, 
etc., hoping soon to make the required amount. During the presidency 
of Mrs. Thomas Harris an effort was made, by an assessment of $8.00 
per member, to complete the fund. Though, quite a number responded 
to this, it was not until two years ago that the scholarship, before 
changed in name to the "Smedes Memorial" and, in value from $2,500 
to $4,000, was, by the generous donation of $1,700 from one member of 
the Alumnae, completed and presented to the Trustees of St. Mary's 
School. 



36 The St. Mary's Muse. 



At its meeting in 1904 the Association decided to take as its work 
the reanbdeling and repairing of St Mairy's Chapjel. To-day we 
opened our meeting in the enlarged Chapel, completed and very much 
beautified. Through the untiring efforts of our President half of the 
cost ($4,000) of this work has been paid. It is hoped that the dues 
and donations given in this meeting, the "Silver Anniversary of the 
Association, will contribute largely to the payment of the other half. 
Among those who have served as officers of the Association are : 
Mrs. W. R. Cox, Mrs. Edward Trapier, 

Mrs. K. de R. Meares, Mrs. Bessie S. Leak, 

Mrs. W. E. Lindsay, Mrs. Thos. C. Harris, 

Mrs. William Boylan, Mrs. I. McK. Pittenger, 

Mrs. Robert Jones, Mrs. Theodore Davidson, 

Mrs. R. S. Tucker, Miss E. W. McVea, 

(Formerly Treasurer, now Vice-President.) Mrs. Iredell. 



Alumnae Notes. 



Miss Marion Hanckel, who studied last year at the University of 
Chicago-, aud wlm during the; past winter successfully conducted the 
work of Superintendent of Kindergarten Instruction in Charleston, 
S. C, has accepted a position to teach at Chatauqua during July and 
August. 

The alumna marriage of the month was that, on the fourteenth, at 
Kocky Mount of Miss Rosa Stewart Gordon, daughter of Mrs. Louise 
Carter Gordon, of Rocky Mount, to Mr. Thomas Thomas, of Beaufort. 
Miss Gordon, after her course at St. Mary's, taught in St, Paul's School, 
Beaufort, and there met the gentleman who Avas to' become her husband. 
The Muse extends congratulations. 

Again, in the death of Mrs. Laura Washington Evans, of Charlotte, 
which took place at the home of her son, Mr. Richard A. Evans., on 
April 27th, in her 78th year, St. Mary's loses one of her oldest alumnae. 
Born in Goldsboro, Mrs. Evans attended St. Mary's in ante-bellum days, 
and spent her married life in Statesville, where her husband, Dr. 
Stephen Evans, died fifteen years ago, by whose side her body is now 
laid to rest. Mrs. Evans was always an active church-woman and was 
much interested in all the interests of her alma mater. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 37 

Miss Mary Hanckel, who has for several years past studied at the Art 
League in New York, and has also been a pupil of Dow, will assist 
Mr. Dow during July and August with his summer class at Ipswich, 
Mass. 

Mrs. Mesenole, of New York (known more familiarly to St. Mary's 
as "Miss Carter"), was in Raleigh during Commencement week, the 
guest of Mrs. Root. She attended all the Commencement exercises, 
and it was a great pleasure to her many friends to see her again. She 
is connected with Miss Brown's school in New York City, and it is 
rumored that some of our girls, on leaving St. Mary's, will go to her 
for a finishing term. 

Mr. Mack, formerly Director of Music at St. Mary's, who has been 
teaching at Hollins Institute, Virginia, ever since he left St Mary's, 
hasi accepted a position on the staff of the Music Conservatory of Syra- 
cuse University, New York, for the coming year, a very desirable posi- 
tion. Mr. Mack is an unusually able teacher and director, and in the 
last five years has become recognized as an able and successful composer. 
St. Mary's rejoices in this opportunity given him for the farther devel- 
opment of his talents and for the enlargement of his sphere of useful- 
ness, and sends through the Muse her hearty congratulations to Mr. 
and Mrs. Mack, while sincerely regretting that the South is to lose 
them. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jeudwine, after a visit to Clifton Springs, 1ST. Y., 
sailed June 8, on the Cymric from Boston for Liverpool. Mr. Jeud- 
wine' s health is much improved, but by order of his. physicians he 
must spend the next year "learning the great art of doing nothing." 
We feel sure this is the hardest task Mr. Jeudwine has ever undertaken, 
but having unbounded faith in his powers we hope that he may suc- 
ceed even in conquering his energy and learn to idle and grow strong. 
We hear the Jeudwines will make England their permanent home!, but 
it is just possible they may be so overwhelmed by numbers of Ameri- 
can guests that they may cross the water again in self-defence. Wher- 
ever they may be and however far away, they are near and dear to' St. 
Mary's. Their address at present is care Miss Hanson, All Saints' 
Cottage, Alton, Hants, England. 



38 The St. Mary's Muse. 



With the Girls During the Summer. 



Kate Winslow, Gertrude Winston, Mary Robinson, Elizabeth 
Gaitber and Rena Clark represented St. Mary's at Horner School Com- 
mencement, and spent there three days most delightfully. Tbree of 
these five girls were presented with marsball's regalias. 

The week after school closed Marguerite Short entertained a number 
of her friends most delightfully at a bouse party given at her summer 
borne, Lake Waccamaw. Tbe St. Mary's girls were represented by 
Ida Evans and Jean Carson. 

During tbe same week Maria Webb was tbe bostess for a similar 
party at her borne in Hillsboro 1 ; Gertrude Winston and Bettie Woolf 
being among her guests. 

Tbere Was quite a gathering of St. Mary's girls in Oxford for the 
Horner Commencement. Beside Rena Clark, Mary Robinson, Kate 
Winslow, Gertrude Winston and Elizabeth Gaitber of this year, Jessa- 
mine Gant and Helen Crenshaw were present to represent those who 
were with us a few years ago. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



VACATION NUMBER. 



Vol. X. 1905. No. 2. 



An Evening in the Sleepy Hollow Country. 



About two o'clock one July afternoon, two hundred of the students 
of Columbia University gathered at Harlem Station to take the cars for 
Irvington, the railway station nearest to Tarrytown and the Irving 
country. We were under the leadership of one of the professors, who, 
I am afraid, found his office not one of the easiest. In the first place, 
while waiting for the Irvington train, some of our party would insist on 
trying to board everyone of the many trains which passed in such quick 
succession that it was no wonder that heads became confused. A num- 
ber of these bewildered and impatient spirits had finally succeeded in 
gleefully crowding on a car when they heard our guide shouting through 
his megaphone, "Columbia — all off!" And Columbia, rather crest- 
fallen, just did get off before the train thundered away to parts other 
than Tarrytown. Yet the right train came at last, and the guide's 
efforts were then directed to> keeping his party on the cars until the 
proper time for leaving them. Most of us, however, were too much 
interested in what we were seeing to think of getting off too soon, for on 
one side were beautiful suburban homes, and on the other the Hudson 
and the Palisades. 

As we left the cars at Irvington, a small boy standing near was heard 
to say, — "Gee whiz ! what a crowd — and not a good-lookin' one among 
'em !" 

All the vehicles in the village had been collected for the three-mile 
drive to the real Sleepy Hollow region. Three of my friends and my- 
self made a dash for the only victoria, among the assortment of wagon- 
ettes and omnibusses, and the one who reached it first was so eager 
to secure it that before the astonished coachman could offer assistance, 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



she had stepped over the door and installed herself in state. Thanks to 
her gymnastic feat, for the rest of the afternoon, we leaned back in com- 
fort, envied by our jolted friends. We drove by the country homes of 
many well-known money-makers and money-spenders of the North, Miss 
Helen Gould's estate being one of the most attractive, but Huyler's pos- 
sibly of more interest to Saint Mary's girls. 

Some sentiment of reverence for genius made our party very quiet 
when we caught sight of the home of Washington Irving — Sunnyside. 
And it is far more quaint and interesting in its picturesque beauty than 
the familiar engravings of it lead one to expect. Compared with the 
imposing modern houses of the neighborhood, it seemed a bit of an 
older world nestled there among the thick vines and low trees. IsTo 
wonder Irving could write to the end of his life in a home like that with 
the Hudson on one side and such grass and woods on the other. 

As the house is now occupied by a nephew of Irving's, only one 
room — the library on the front — is open to visitors. But it is the 
room of chief interest, for it was Irving's work room, and has been pre- 
served very much as he left it. One incident in the library was some- 
what amusing. A man in a dress suit was standing in one corner show- 
ing to the company a picture of Irving as a little boy, when a teacher, 
who must have come from some rather unconventional community, asked 
him,— "Are you Washington Irving's nephew ?" The merest suspicion 
of a smile appeared on the impassive face of the Englishman as he 
answered, "He is away from home. I am his butler." 

Of course we had to have our pictures taken (the small boy's criticism 
notwithstanding), and as we sat on the hillside in front of the vine- 
covered houses and watched the photographers efforts to persuade two 
hundred people to keep still, I thought of another photographer, of 
another two hundred, and of another vine-covered house of rock, — all 
far away in the South. 

We then drove to the Episcopal church of which Irving was for years 
a warden and where is erected a tablet to his memory. There we were 
met by Irving's last rector, a dear old-school clergyman of eighty-three, 
who entertained us with stories grave and gay of his former vestryman, 
who was loved for his own attractive personality as much as for his 
delightful books. After leaving this church where Irving himself had 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



worshipped, we started for that connected with a personage hardly less 
real — Ichabod Crane. Down the road, over which the frightened peda- 
gogue had urged Gunpowder, we went, and across the bridge, where 
! Ichabod had fallen before the pumpkin thrown by the redoubtable Brom 
Bones. At least the brook spanned by the bridge is the old brook and 
the present bridge is a direct descendant of that which was the scene 
of Ichabod's discomfiture. So we reached the heart of Sleepy Hollow — 
j the little Dutch church. Whatever restorations may be suspected else- 
where, this building is a genuine relic, its present inmates claiming on 
I good grounds that his tiny place of worship is the oldest original church 
! building in the United States. We saw the gallery in front of which 
Ichabod used to stand and lead the choir whom he had trained in 
psalmody. 

After having walked toward the Hudson to the mill of the 

"Legend" and the old Philipse castle of pre-Revolutionary fame, we 

wandered off into the beautiful Sleepy Hollow country. Of it, Irving 

says : "To look upon its grass-grown yard, where the sunbeams seem to 

sleep so quietly, one would think that there at least the dead might rest 

in peace." And there, the magician himself found a resting-place 

| among the people and in the valley to which he gave such a place in 

! literature that the passing of a hundred years finds interest in them 

land their gentle historian unshaken. 

We walked on up the Pocantico Creek until we came to a spot suitable 
for picnicking, where we ate our lunch and afterwards made a bonfire of 
(the boxes and papers on a rock in the water, so that the stream and its 
banks might not look the worse for our visit. 

We had now been in Sleepy Hollow for several hours, and Irving 
tells us that "however wideawake people may be before they enter that 
(sleepy region, they are sure in a little time to inhale the witching influ- 
ence of the air and begin to grow imaginative — to dream dreams and 
see apparitions." Our guide, at least, was affected, and while we sat on 
the grassy slope, with the stones of the cemetery gleaming ghostlike 
through the dimness of twilight, he told us stories of the witch of 
pleepy Hollow and of the Indian chief who seized and married the star 
aiden only to lose her. "Yet," our guide went on to say, "on some 
I nights and the right nights, one who walks along the lonely road by the 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Poncantico and listens aright, may hear the star maiden calling her 
deserted lover, whom she came hack from her star home, where time is 
not, to seek and never to find." 

The story-telling over, we hurried to our carriages and had soon left 
the haunted valley behind, hut not our wonder that so near the great 
city of this western world could still exist so pleasing a land of drowsy- 
head. 



Perhaps. 



A little maiden sat beneath a budding tree, 
A prettier little maiden you need never wish to see. 
The birds were singing sweetly and the roses fair 
Were filling with their fragrance all the sweet spring air. 

Then why, O why, does that maiden sigh, 

And look so doleful and almost cry, 
Companions she has plenty, for around her play 
A dozen pretty maidens on that bright spring day. 

Then what can be the matter, 

Why she does not even chatter, 
And the laughter of her playmates seems an idle empty clatter- 
She shrugs her shoulders, bites her lips and shakes her curls, 
And then in scorn and anger cries, "They're only girls." 

A-drizzle, drizzle, drizzle, falls the driving rain, 

A cold and howling blizzard sweeps across the hill and plain, 

The little maiden's sitting in a cold dark room 

And everywhere, both in and out is gloom, gloom, gloom. 

Then why, O why, does that maiden sigh 

And look so happy and almost cry, 
Her comrades all have left her, there remains not one 
Of all the pretty girls that played in spring's bright sun, 

Then what can be the matter 

What means that happy clatter 
Her laughter trills, her little tongue goes clatter, clatter, clatter, 
Her laughing eyes are full of life and dance with joy 
She's only one companion now, but he's — a boy, 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



With the Class of 1905. 



It will be remembered that the monthly Muse, had its reawakening 
under the guidance of the class of 1905, and it is largely through their 
efforts and particularly those of the editor-in-chief, that the Muse is 
now firmly established with a growing circulation. We believe the 
readers of the Muse will be glad to hear something of the members of 
this class, where they spent their vacation and what are their plans for 
the future — although it has not been possible to> get news from all of 
them. 

Anna Clark spent part of her vacation at the Knoxville, Tenn., sum- 
mer school, and will teach at home, Scotland Neck, this year. 

Mamie Rossell was ill with typhoid fever all the early part of the 
summer. She is now in Canada, where she is rapidly getting her 
strength back. During the winter she will be at her home in Long 
Island, and part of the time in Pensacola, Florida. Rena Clark has 
been kept at home all summer by Isabel's sickness. She will also be at 
home all winter. 

Effie Fairley and Florence Grant have visited each other during the 
summer, and Florence has spent part of the time at Wrightsville Beach. 

Bessie Law has spent most of the summer in Raleigh, and expects to 
teach. 

Sadie Jenkins and Dorothy Hughson both went North from St. 
Mary's — Dorothy to New Haven, Conn., where she had a most delight- 
ful visit, and was in time for the Yale Commencement. She spent the 
rest of the summer in Orange, N. J., and will remain there until the 
last of October, going home then by way of Raleigh. She expects to 
help Marjorie in the mission school work in Morganton. Sadie and 
Mrs. Jenkins were in New York, where Sadie took her "Vergil system" 
certificate, but she also had time for much sightseeing and enjoyment. 
She spent the rest of the summer at Edisto Island, S, C. 

Ida Evans went from St. Mary's to Wilmington, where she visited 
her grandparents, and was at Marguerite Short's house party. She has 
been most of the summer in Warrenton, Virginia, where she and Louise 
have Had visits from Jennie Murchison and other St. Mary's friends. 
Ida will be in Wilmington and Warrenton this winter. 



6 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Margaret DuBose, who remains to represent the class at St. Mary's, 
spent part of June in Western North Carolina, but has been most of 
the summer at St, Mary's, and will continue her music lessons this 
winter. 

Mossie Long has had quite a round of gaieties, which has included a 
camping party the first part of the summer, a delightful week at Jack- 
son Springs and then visits to different resorts in the North Carolina 
mountains. She will visit friends in Georgia in the fall and after 

Christmas she may go to New York to school. 

I. E. 



Brief Notes of the Faculty. 



Miss Pittenger spent most of the vacation with relatives in Connec- 
ticut. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sanborn and the Misses Sanborn have been enjoying 
their summer home at Buena Yista, Ya. The first little grandchild 
came to visit their married daughter's home this summer. 

Miss Cribbs attended the summer school session of the University of 
Alabama at Tuscaloosa. Her elocution department promises to be large 
this year, and outdoor athletics should boom under her influence. 

Miss McKimmon spent the early part of the summer in Raleigh and 
the latter part in Fayetteville, at the home of her sister, Mrs. Hawley, 
where she especially enjoyed the society of her little grand-nephew, little 
Master Bacon, aged four months, the son of Mrs. Bacon, once Kate 
Hawley, of St. Mary's. 

Miss Thomas, during July and August, was in attendance at the 
summer school of Columbia University, New York City. She reports 
having had a delightful time there, with many pleasant experiences, of 
one of which she tells elsewhere in this number. She is with relatives 
in South Carolina until school opens. 

Mr. Stone with Mrs. Stone and Florence have been spending the sum- 
mer at the home of Mrs. Stone's mother, Mrs. Judge Dick, in Greens- 
boro, where the Stones formerly lived. Mr. Stone and his family are 
looking forward with pleasure to occupying their new home on Boylan 
Avenue early this fall. They will then be much nearer the school. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 7 

Miss Lee has spent most of the summer with her mother and other 
relatives and friends in Ealeigh. Her mother will spend this winter in 
Alabama, while Miss Lee will take charge of the West Rock Hall. 

The vacancy in the department of French and German, noted in the 
June Muse, was filled early in July by the appointment of Mile. Anna 
Masch, a teacher of wide experience abroad and in America, and who 
has recently been teaching in New England. Miss Masch spent her 
vacation in East Orange, 1ST. J. 

Miss Shipp has spent the entire summer abroad. She sailed with her 
party of young ladies from Boston on June 3d. They reached Gibral- 
tar June 13, and after visiting the principal Spanish Cities, — Cadiz, Se- 
ville, Cordova and Grenada — passed on to Italy, where they were to spend 
about a month. The trip then included parts of Austria, Switzerland 
and Germany, Paris, with all its mysteries, London and Oxford. The 
itinerary was a most interesting one, and Miss Shipp an ideal chaperone, 
having travelled extensively and being thoroughly familiar with the 
places and subjects of interest. Three of her party — Misses May and 
Susie Johnston, of Raleigh, and Leila Phillips, of Tarboro, are old 
St. Mary's girls. The party was to sail for home early in September, 
and will, doubtless, be safely back by the time this Muse reaches its 
readers. 

Not many "old St. Mary's girls" returning as new members of the 
faculty could receive a heartier welcome than does Kate Meares, who was 
elected during vacation as assistant in French, German and Latin. 
She came to St. Mary's when quite a little girl and was graduated in 
1903, after a five years' residence, during which she steadily moved 
toward a high standard of character and scholarship. In her senior 
year she was President of the Sigma Lambda Literary Society, and was 
one of the winners of the first inter-society debates. She was also 
essayist of the class of 1903. The first year after leaving St. Mary's 
Miss Meares spent in study at the University of North Carolina, and 
last year she taught at St. Paul's School, Beaufort. She has made sev- 
eral visits to St. Mary's since 1903, so that she seems not to have sepa- 
rated herself from us at all ; her welcome is, therefore, all the warmer. 

"Miss Katie," after spending the early summer in Fayetteville, 
made a short visit to Miss Slater at her sister's in Winston- Salem, and 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



went on to finish the vacation in the North Carolina mountains, at 
Arden. 

Miss Sutton had a beautiful summer in the Catskill mountains. On 
her return she spent a week with friends in New York City and finished 
her vacation with a visit to Miss Bowen at Jackson. 

Miss M. M. Jones, after a visit to Miss Graham in Oxford, joined 
her sister in New York and went to Orr's Island off the Maine coast, 
where she will remain until she enters Columbia College. 

Miss Balfour is in Michigan playing in "Under Southern Skies." 
St, Mary's good wishes go with her. 

We quote from a Cuban paper the advertisement of the new Episcopal 
High School: 

"A select school for girls will open October 2nd, 1905, at Vedado, 
15th St., Bet. C. & D. (Havana). Primary and Kindergarten depart- 
ments in connection. Miss E. E. Checkley, Principal. Apply for 
information to Bev. C. B. Colmoe, 15th St., Bet. B. & C." 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



While the summer has been one of joy to some, to others the prevail- 
ing note has been one of sadness. To each of those bereaved the Muse 
extends sincere sympathy. 

Mrs. Seay lost her mother, Mrs, Grabau, in May. 

Mary Villepigue lost her baby brother in June. 

In June Miss Hull's father died in Illinois. 

Mrs. Marshall, wife of Dr. Marshall, of Christ Church, known and 
loved by many St. Mary's girls, died July 11. 

In June Mary Ella Moore lost her brother, and in August Mary 
Alexander's father passed away. Neither of the girls will return. 

Miss Dowd lost her only brother on July 23. He had lived in Texas 
many years, but their childhood was passed in Tarboro, and Capt. 
Dowd was a graduate of the University of North Carolina. 

On July 23d Miss Mary Mackay, a sister of Margaret Mackay, and 
a diploma graduate in Vocal Music at St. Mary's (1904), died after a 
lingering illness. 

And on June 26th, at St. Mary's, there passed away suddenly at the 

Rectory, Dr. Anderson, father of Mrs. DuBose, and since the coming 

of the present Rector a resident of the school. His friends of St. 

Mary's will be interested in the following: 

Henry Mortimer Anderson was born near Baltimore, December 4, 1823. Gradu- 
ated in medicine from Columbia College, New York, he practiced for a number of 
years in Eome, Ga., and during the war was surgeon in various hospitals, and aide 
to the Confederate Generals Loring and Stephenson. Later many offices of honor and 
trust were bestowed upon him. He was Treasurer of the University of the South, 
Grand Master of the Masons in Tennessee and a member of the St. Luke's Medical 
Association of London. Dr. Anderson's family connection was of the highest. He 
was a brother-in-law of Bishop Quintard, and a descendant of an old Scottish family. 
He married Miss Julia Hand, of Georgia, of whom it is interesting to note that she 
was the intimate friend and bridesmaid of the mother of President Roosevelt. Dr. 
Anderson was a "typical Southern gentleman of the old school with its high stand- 
ards, courtly manners, sweet deference to others, and intense interest in everything 
relating to the welfare of his family and friends. His passing will be felt deeply by 
all who knew and loved him." 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Subscription, One Year. = = = = One Dollar. 

Single Copies. = = = = = Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, 
N. C, in the interest of the students and Alurnnse, under the editorial management of the 
Senior Class. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 

Correspondence from friends solicited. raleigh, K. C. 



Application made at the post-office at Raleigh, for admission to the mail as second-class matter 



The History of the Muse. 



To those who read the Muse and are interested in it as a product of 
St. Mary's it may not be amiss to speak a few words of the paper's 
history : 

Our readers know that the present number of the Muse is the second 
of the second year of its existence in its present form, that this is the 
tenth number, but the date line reads, Vol. X, ISTo. 2. 

It was in 1879 that the Muse first came into being. It was produced 
as a step in the work of Mr. Sanborn — the same Mr. Sanborn who is 
now Music Director at St. Mary's — who was at that time Dr. Bennett 
Smedes' Director. The publication was intended primarily for the 
development of the Music Department, and was a little eight page 
pamphlet with pages about the size of that of the present Muse. It was 
to be issued quarterly "in the interest of art, literature, education and of 
St. Mary's School." Containing brief notes and comments on various 
topics of current interest in the music and literary world, with a few 
items about St. Mary's, it was rather a little newspaper in St. Mary's, 
than the little St. Mary's newspaper. In accordance with its professed 
purpose of building up the Music Department, the paper appropriately 
received its name, The St. Mary's Muse." 

After its establishment Mr. Sanborn turned over the supervision to 
the Lady Principal, at that time Mrs. Meares, and the paper was 
edited under her direction by "Euterpe and the Pierian Club." 



The St. Mary's Muse. 11 



In its second year it took on a blue cover, nearer the Virgin blue of 
St. Mary's than is the present ISFeopolitan blue cover, and with the 
increase of its pages it became a quarterly instead of a monthly. In 
this form were published volumes II, III, IV, after the departure of Mr. 
Sanborn, under the direction of Mrs. Meares and her successor, Miss 
Czarnomska. Volume V, in 1883, contained but two numbers, and 
then, like many another school publication, the paper slumbered. 

When the magic wand of effort called it forth again 1896 had come, 
and Miss McVea, as Lady Principal, was at the helm. Thirteen years 
of sleep, and yet the little new volume VI seemed to follow directly on 
the old volume V. In the introductory editorial of the first number of 
last year's Muse we quoted from the introductory editorial in this first 
number of this Muse of 1896. Our feeling was much like theirs ; their 
purpose apparently as strong as ours, and yet — just two numbers of the 
magazine appeared, in May, '96, and October, '96, and again the publi- 
cation was suspended. 

In 1899 the next paper appeared, this time one number only, the 
"Holly Berry" Christmas Muse. The class of the next year, largely 
through the untiring energy of "Minna Bynum" (now Mrs. Archibald 
Henderson, of Chapel Hill), devoted their efforts to compiling Volume 
VIII into a single number, a book of a hundred pages instead of a 
magazine of twenty. In this magazine that class had the sad duty of 
commemorating the death of Dr. Smedes, who passed away that spring. 
We call that Muse "The Smedes Memorial edition" or the "Minna 
Bynum Muse." It was at once magazine and year book — the first- 
attempt at a year book St. Mary's had had. Magazine in form it was 
about the size of a standard magazine without illustrations other than 
Dr. Smedes' portrait. Financially it was not a success, and we have 
a hundred copies on hand now, but it gave an impulse to the work that 
has grown steadily since. It was Volume VIII, and with it the Muse, 
as a magazine, stopped until 1904. 

With the passing of the Lady Principal the Senior Class took full 
charge of the work and the class of 1900, under Dr. Bratton, decided 
to confine its efforts to getting out a year book. 1901, 1902, 1903, 1904, 
1905 followed their example, each producing an annual creditable to 
the class and the school. 



12 The St. Mary's Muse. 



But the school needed a monthly, the students wanted an annual. 
The Class of 1905 tried to please both. How well the class succeeded 
you are able to judge. It did its best. The present Muse speaks for 
itself. 



The Summer at St. Mary's. 



The trip of the Rector to Western South Carolina and Sewanee in 
June was interrupted by the unexpected death of Dr. Anderson, and 
Mr. DuBose did not leave the school again until the first of September, 
when, accompanied by Mc^Teely, Jr., he enjoyed a ten days' fishing trip 
at Wrightsville Beach. Mrs. DuBose and the other members of the 
family have been at St, Mary's uninterruptedly since June. 

Mrs. Seay spent part of June with her daughter's family in Char- 
lotte, and then resumed her duties at St. Mary's. Mr. Cruikshank was 
away during most of August at different points in Maryland. 

Thanks to the frequent rains the grove has been at its prettiest most of 
the summer and the loss of the trees, blown down in the May storm, is 
hardly felt, though there has been much difficulty in getting rid of their 
remains. In July the roofs and a large part of the exteriors of the 
buildings, including the front porch and Miss Katie's blinds, were 
freshened up with new paint, and much painting was done in the inte- 
riors. The old girls will find the school-room resplendent with its 
new benches and maps, and will hardly be able to find their old places. 
We hope, too, that they will be pleased with the new Muse Room in 
East Rock, and that it will add to their comfort. The many little 
changes they will note with pleasure and the finding of them will be as 
good as an Easter-egg Hunt during some of the first mournful hours of 
the session. 

The other Raleigh schools are ahead of us with their openings this 
year and the A. and M. College and Baptist University will have been 
in session two weeks when our session begins, while the girls of Peace 
will have been away from home a full week. But even if we put aside 
the joys of the school work, there is the Great State Pair, with the visit 
of the President, to look forward to, and who knows how much besides. 



The St. Mahy's Muse. 13 

Kaleigh is very quiet in the summer, despite the numerous excursions 
that are poured into it day by day, but it reaches its annual awakening 
with the return of the student throng, and all will be alive from now on. 



'ith Our Girls in the Summer. 



Mossie Long was in Asheville for a short time. 

Mary Villepigue has been at her summer home in Saluda. 

Miss Checkley has been put in charge, by Bishop Knight, of a girls 7 
school in Havana, Cuba. 

Eev. Mr. George and family have moved to Marietta, Ga., which he 
has accepted for his parish. 

Leonore Seay spent two very charming weeks at Cleveland Springs, 
near Charlotte, with Mrs. Spruill and Alice. 

Jennie Murchison and Caro Gray, while visiting in Fayetteville, were 
charmingly entertained by JSTorcott Broadfoot. 

Helen Strange is spending the last month before school begins at her 
grandfather's place, just outside of Lawrenceville, Va. 

Amy Fitz-Simons, after visiting Isabel Ruff, spent part of the sum- 
mer in Hendersonville, 1ST. C. Mae Wood Winslow also was there for 
a short visit. 

After one of the dances at Scotland Neck, Anna Clark gave a supper 
to all the St. Mary's girls present. Among these were guests at her 
house party: Minnie Burgwyn, Josephine Bowen, Carrie Helen Moore, 
Mattie Hunter and Margaret Stedman. 

The Bowens and Minnie Burgwyn, successively, entertained at house 
parties at their homes in Jackson, K C, in July. Isabel Brundy, '04, 
Anna Clark, '05, Carrie Helen Moore, '04, Mattie Hunter and Nannie 
Smith were the visitors. There was much pleasure and gaiety. 

Sadie Jenkins was one of the hostesses at a delightful "maroon" on 
Edisto Island in early July. Among the twenty-five guests were: 
Georgette Holmes and Serena Bailey. Emma Barnwell and Margaret 
DuBose were prevented from attending by deaths in their families. 



14 The St. Mast's Muse. 

Floy Ruff will attend the College for Women, Columbia. 

Annie Sloan and Amy Fitz-Simons visited Isabel and Ret Ruff. 

Rosa Thomas will teach this year in Ridgeway Graded School. 

Isabel and Ret Ruff and Amy Fitz-Simons visited Annie Sloan in 
Columbia. 

Jessie Harris visited Mossie Long this summer at her home in 
Rockingham. 

Virginia Kyser's father has been ill in Rocky Mount but is now 
much better. She will not be back before Christmas. 

Ella Davis has been in Raleigh visiting her cousin, Miss Duncan. 
She will teach in St. Paul's School, Beaufort, the coming year. 

St. Mary's was well represented at the S. 0. C. Commencement. 
Those attending were Sumter Thomas, Lucy Heyward, Gussie Jones, 
Amy Fitz-Simons, Annie Sloan, Isabel and Ret Ruff. 

Wrightsville Beach has been visited by a number of St. Mary's girls 
this summer. Helen Strange, Isabel Brumby, Emmie Drewry, Maria 
Webb, Fay Brown, Alexina Wilson and Daisy Green. 

Anna Clark also visited Rena Clark in Tarboro, and was present at 
one of the most successful of the Tarboro Germans. Among the guests 
were several old St. Mary's girls : Gretchen Barnes, Margaret Connor, 
Pearl Fort, Lizzie Hill, Elba Cotton, Florida Cotton and Mary Marriott. 

Isabel Brumby, after spending the winter in Florida, where she 
was visited by Mary Hunter and other St. Mary's friends, paid a visit in 
Wilmington. From there she went to Minnie Burgwyn's house party, 
stopping for a night each way at St. Mary's. Then, after paying Rosa- 
lie Bernhardt a vist in Salisbury, she went on to Asheville and Knox- 
ville before returning home. 



Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 



President, - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 
("Mrs. M. T. Leak, Durham. 

Vice-Pkesidents, \ ^ rs - 1 ^. Pittenger, Raleigh, 
' J Mrs. P. P. Tucker, Raleigh, 
(.Mrs.Kate de R Meares, Wilmington. 
Sec.-Tkeas., - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's 



The Alumnae Bulletin. 



This number of the Muse contains little alumnae news, though numer- 
ous notes of the doings and goings of the girls of more recent years will 
be foimd in the school notes. We hope, with the second season of the 
Muse, that we can have more systematic correspondence with the 
Alumnae Chapters, the St. Mary's Guilds, at the various points, and 
also get in closer touch with the individual alumna?. 

Especially do we need their interest and aid this fall in the? publica- 
tion of what should be to alumnae generally a very interesting pamphlet. 
The next issue of the St. Mary's Bulletin, which will appear 1 in No- 
vember, will be devoted to some statistical history of the alumnae of St. 
Mary's from its organization, by Dr. Aldert Smedes, down to the 
present. This work has not been attempted before, and should be of 
great interest to everyone interested in the work, welfare and history of 
the school, and especially to those who have themselves been pupils here 
or who have had relatives here. Those who have tried to keep such 
records know what a task it is to make them accurate, even when the 
list is begun with the beginnings of the school, and it is entirely impos- 
sible without the help, of the pupils themselves. At St. Mary's we are 
handicapped by a start sixty-three years late, and faced by an utter lack 
of any data or lists for the first thirty-eight fertile years of the school's 
existence. There is a record of the girls who have registered at St. 
Mary's since 1879, with their school addresses. An examination and 
enquiry shows that fully one-half of these girls have slipped out of 
reach of those most intimately associated with the school life. The 
memory of them in their school days lives on, but their subsequent story 



16 The St. Mary's Muse. 



is lost in the changes of name and location subsequent to married or 
business life. 

During the next two months we shall make every effort to collect as 
extensive and correct a list as possible of the St. Mary's Alumnae, their 
names and addresses and the dates of their school life, their married 
names (if married), and present addresses, and any facts of general 
interest in their later lives. Most of this information will have to be 
obtained from the members of the alumnas. Each can contribute a little 
information, and all combined will make a goodly total, which will con- 
tain matters of interest to each one. 

We ask that each member of the alumna? will answer as fully as pos- 
sible our inquiries on the subject, and shall take it as a great favor if 
any old girl will write us of her own accord and give us such informa- 
tion as she may have. 

We shall be very glad to hear from any one on this subject. 



Notes. 

Mary Euth Thomas went to Arizona for the summer. 

Julia Harris will teach in Mr. Hobgood's school in Oxford next 
year. 

Esther Means' address has recently changed to 35 East Fourth street, 
Atlanta. 

Lilly Elizabeth Dodd was graduated, cum laude, from the University 
of Knoxville last June. She will make teaching her profession. 

"The Beebes" have spent the summer in Warrenton, Virginia, where 
they have been the centre of much social gaiety. Julia Haughton 
visited them in August. 

Miss Slater, class of '82, formerly a member of the Faculty of St. 
Mary's, now teaching biology in the Flushing High School, paid a visit 
to Mrs. A. W. Knox in August. 

Isabel Brumby ('04), of Marietta, Ga., stopped on her way to the 
house party at Jackson, at St. Mary's, with Margaret DuBose. Lucy 
Bedwood ("'04) also spent several days at St. Mary's during vacation. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 17 

A marriage of interest to St. Mary's was that on June 6th last at 
Scotland Neck of Miss Pauline Arrington Shields, formerly a student 
here, to Mr. Chas. Herbert Herring. St. Mary's extends belated con- 
gratulations. 

The host of friends of Bishop Bratton are much interested in the yel- 
low fever situation in the South on account of his proximity to the 
fever territory, as well as for general reasons. He writes, however, that 
all is well with him at present and his friends hope that he may not be 
called into the sphere of immediate danger. 

Christine Busbee, after a year at Cornell, has spent the summer at 
her home in Baleigh. She is enthusiastic about Cornell and tells much 
of interest about the place, but she did not tell us what we learned from 
other sources, that she made a splendid record and was made a Phi 
Beta Kappa. She will teach Mathematics next year at Mt. Holyoke 
College. 

Two members of the Faculty received invitations to Laura Mann's 
marriage, which took place on August 22d at Middleton, 1ST. C. She 
was married to Mr. Dennis W. Simmons, and they will make their home 
in Durham, 1ST. C. Her friends at St. Mary's remember Laura's school 
girl days with pleasure, and they send her, through the Muse, hearty 
good wishes for her happiness. 

Ethel and Mabel Hughes, from ISTew York, were in Baleigh in 
August visiting their uncle, Dr. A. W. Knox. Ethel divided her time 
with Josephine Ashe, a class mate in the art class at St. Mary's, and at 
the Art League in New York City. Mabel's work is accompanying 
singers and violinists, and she has made quite a success of it. Ethel 
studied last year with Chase and is now making a specialty of the study 
of portrait painting. 



18 The St. Mary's Muse. 



OFFICIAL : The Opening Exercises at St. Mary's. 



The Sixty-third session of St, Mary's School will open on Thursday, 
September 21. In order to facilitate the work of classifying pupils the 
following program has been arranged for the week. Parents and pupils 
are requested to observe the schedule strictly : 

Tuesday, September 19 — New pupils from the city will report at the 
office for registration and classification at 9 a. m. 

Wednesday, September 20— Old pupils from the city will report at 
the office at 9 a. m. 

Thursday, September 21—9 to 10:30 a. m— Boarding pupils will 
report at the office for registration and classification. 

10 :30 a. m. — All pupils, city and boarders, will meet in the Study- 
Hall in the Main Building. 

11:00 a. m. — Opening service. The procession will form in the 
Study-Hall, where faculty and pupils have assembled. The order of 
the procession will be — day pupils, followed by boarding pupils, faculty, 
trustees and the Bishop of the Diocese — to the Chapel. 

2 :00 to 4 :30 p. m. — The registration and classification of boarding 
pupils will continue at the office. 

2 :00 to 5 :30 p. m. — Those pupils entering by examination and those 
old pupils who have made up work in the summer and are ready to 
stand examination upon it will report to the Study-Hall for examina- 
tion. 

Friday, September 22, 9 :00 a. m.— Regular morning service in the 

Chapel. 

9 :30 to 1 :30 — Further registration and classification. 

9 :30 to 1 :30 — Examinations as arranged on the preceding day, and 
announced. 

2 :00 to 5 :00 — Further classification, arranging, and examination. 

Saturday, September 17— The regular class-work will begin, each 
pupil reporting to all classes as scheduled ready for assignment of work. 

9 :10 a. m. — Regular morning service in the Chapel. 

9 :30 to 3 :30 — Regular classes and class-work. 

K B. — Parents and pupils on arriving at the School are requested to 
come at once to the office in the East Rock House, where all pupils will 
register, and full information, with details, will be furnished. 



October, 1905 



■I 



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. 



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St. flfcarv's flfouse 



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IRaleiob, fL C, 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

OPENING NUMBER. 



Vol. X. October, 1905. No. 3. 



The Sixty-Fourth Annual Opening of St. Mary's. 



The "third Thursday in September" is so often marked by the equi- 
noctial storm as well as by the opening of St. Mary's — witness the 
experience of 1903 and 1904 — that the bright weather of the first 
week of the session of 1905 — '06 was especially pleasing and cheer- 
ing. The opening for the year's work was a very auspicious one. After 
the long vacation the girls 'were unusually prompt in assembling and 
a large portion of them were on hand for the first service at eleven 
on the morning of the 21st. At that hour the school formally gathered 
in the assembly room as usual and marched in procession to the Chapel. 
There Bishop Cheshire, President of the Board of Trustees, assisted 
by the Hector, said a simple service after which he addressed the school 
in words of welcome, dwelling especially on the successful adminis- 
tration of the school in the past and the bright prospects for the future. 

This was all of the formal opening, but a feeling of joy and glad- 
ness characterized the proceedings. The goodly number, the hearty 
reception, the uplifting service, the Bishop's inspiring words, were 
all strengthening and invigorating. Old teachers and old girls seemed 
alike glad to be back amid the familiar scenes; new girls and new 
teachers entered heartily into the occasion and soon felt as much at 
home as if they had known St. Mary's always. 

The prospects for the year are most encouraging. The enrollment 
is larger than a year ago ; the new pupils as a rule are better prepared 
than heretofore; the buildings and equipment are all in shape and there 
is nothing to interfere with the regular work. Looking back a year 
there are distinct reasons for rejoicing in the signs of progress. In 
September, 1904, the enlarged chapel was still far from being com- 
pleted, and even until Christmas the regular services, such an essential 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



part of the training at St. Mary's, could be held only under great dis- 
advantages. No school could ask for a sweeter chapel than the com- 
pleted chapel at St. Mary's to-day. Again, a year ago, there seemed 
little prospect of the early lifting of the purchase debt or of the erection 
of additional buildings, despite the pressing need for them. During the 
past year the Clement bequest, under which St, Mary's becomes a resid- 
uary legatee, apparently assures the erection of a new dormitory build- 
ing in the not too distant future and will serve also to help reduce the 
debt ; the third payment from the Mary Ruffin Smith Fund has aided in 
the same matter, and now the donation of the Pittman Fund for use at 
St. Mary's will give the so much needed auditorium, and apparently 
assures its completion within a year. 

There are a number of changes in the faculty this year as well as 
in the student body, and the new members of both faculty and students 
have made a very favorable first impression. Of the one hundred and 
thirty boarding students about four-fifths have their homes in the Caro- 
linas, though there are nine states and thirteen dioceses represented. 
One of the most gratifying features is the increase in the number 
of South Carolina girls, twice as many this session as last, the South 
Carolinians now numbering thirty-four. The school lost little time 
in getting into running shape and is now well settled in the regular rou- 
tine work of the year. 

The Pittman Bequest. 



And here it is well to speak further of the Pittman bequest, received 
in September and at once made public by the trustees, under the pro- 
vision of which two new scholarships are established and the erection 
cf an auditorium assured. 

This gift comes through the provisions of the will of the late Mrs. 
Mary Eliza Pittman of Tarboro, N. C. Mrs. Pittman's maiden name 
was Mary Eliza Battle and by her first marriage she was Mrs. Mary 
Eliza Dancy. She provided in her will that one-third of her real pro- 
perty should be used for some religious or charitable purpose to estab- 
lish a memorial to her daughter, Eliza Battle Pittman, who died in 
1890. Her son, Frank B. Dancy, of Atlanta, is her executor, and 






The St. Mary's Muse. 



as such is entrusted with carrying out the provisions of Mrs. Pittman's 
will, and, inasmuch as both Mrs. Pittman and Miss Pittman were 
former pupils of St. Mary's, he decided to offer the memorial to the 
trustees of St. Mary's for the erection of "The Eliza Battle Pittman 
Memorial Building." The value of the bequest was found to be 
$13,000. 

The trustees have formally considered and accepted this offer, and in 
doing so have established two new scholarships at the school to be known 
as the "Eliza Battle Pittman Scholarships," and to be awarded to 
young women of Tarboro or Edgecombe County, the home of the Pitt- 
mans. It is planned to erect the new building to the right of the pres- 
ent West Rock House, a good site, where it will be the nearest of the 
buildings to the street and present a handsome appearance. The work 
is to be pushed as rapidly as possible and architects have already been 
invited to submit plans. 



An Afternoon in Venice. 



The party of six or seven American tourists had just separated into 
smaller groups, and stepped into gondolas. Several of them were 
elderly and dignified, but there was one young woman who was bubbling 
over with youthful activity. She had taken a seat by her father, and 
began enthusiastically discussing the different places of interest. Then 
she was silent, as the gondola was passing under the Bridge of Sighs, 
and the gloom that history threw around it impressed her. Under 
there shadows were deep, and the water, lapping against the bridge, 
made a mournful sound. The young girl glanced at the gondolier. 
He was more picturesque than most of his fellows, and his dark 
Italian eyes looked as if they might have belonged to one of those 
prisoners, condemned, yet innocent, who gazed toward his beloved city 
for the last time. 

When the boat slowly glided from the arch, the father and daughter, 
looking at the ducal palace and the prison, tried to imagine themselves 
back in the Middle Ages. 

Suddenly the girl spoke, "Papa, suppose you and I were living in 
the old days — the days of the secret trials, wouldn't it be dreadful? 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



But then the rulers would not put you in prison, because you would not 
do anything wicked to deserve it," He smiled down on her affection- 
ately. "The accusations were not always just, you know, dear." 
She was silent again while her father consulted the guide book. 

He was interrupted by the gondolier, who spoke to him in Italian. 
The elderly man turned to his daughter, saying, "Eunice, he wishes 
to know where to take us now. What do you say V She thought a 
minute, then answered, "Papa, do you mind if we don't go to any cele- 
brated place to-day ? I think I am not in the right mood." 

Then laughing, "You know I can't grasp too much at once. Tell 
him that we would like to go down that pretty little canal yonder. 

Eunice had her way — as usual. 

When they reached the narrow canal, she was absorbed in wondering 
about the inhabitants of the old houses that bordered it. 

This time her father broke the silence. "What a beautiful girl — 
a typical Italian, I should think — isn't her dress picturesque — and look 
at her eyes !" The person of whom he spoke was leaning from a tiny 
balcony. She smiled at the gondolier and seemed not to notice his 
passengers. The happy expression, however, soon left her face. Evi- 
dently his greeting was not what she expected. 

Eunice looked at the girl and tried to decide what her name was. 
The American girl leaned back and wove romances about her. 

In a few minutes, she was aroused by her father's remark that it 
was time to meet their friends. She looked at her watch, and as she 
did so, a spray of flowers fell from her belt. They were withered, so 
she let them remain in the bottom of the boat. 

Half an hour later, the gondola had drawn up in front of the hotel, 
and the two Americans had joined their friends in the saloon. 

Eunice, soon tiring of the conversation, walked to a window facing 
the canal. She liked to look at the water, reflecting the exquisite 
shades of the sunset sky. ISTot very far away she could see the gondola 
her father had hired that afternoon. The gondolier was standing 
in the boat. Suddenly stooping, he picked up something from near 
the seats. After looking at the little object for several minutes, he 
carefully put it into the pocket of his blouse. 

"My flowers !" thought the girl. "I am sure that papa would be 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



very angry if he knew, yet — yet, what harm can they do V Not 
wishing to watch the gondolier any longer, she was leaving the win- 
dow, when she noticed that he was poling the boat away. Perhaps — 
yes, he was going in the direction of the little canal through which he 
had taken them. Eunice laughed and said almost aloud, "He is going 
to see the pretty Venetian girl. I wonder if those were my flowers, 
after all. S. C. Bailey. 



School Notes. 



Isabel Ruff is spending the winter in Washington. 

We hear that Bessie Gray will be married this month. 

Florence Kidder is at Madame Le Febre's in Baltimore. 

Fannie Johnson is studying violin at the New England Conserva- 
tory in Boston. 

Sumter Thomas and Isabel Turpin will be in Charlotte next month 
to attend Stuart Jones' debut party. 

Josephine Bowen spent a few days at St. Mary's during the open- 
ing, on her way to Fletcher, where she is teaching this winter. 

The Senior Class has elected the following officers : Bettie Woolf ; 
President; Margaret Mackay, Secretary; Annie Sloan, Treasurer. 

Sadie Jenkins, '05, has lately been elected to a position on the music 
faculty of Winthrop College where Miss Schutt and Susie Battle are 
also teaching. 

We miss Olive Morrill very much from the Senior Class. Why 
would she insist on growing up a year too soon for us ! It was very 
nice to have her with us during Fair Week. 

It is always very pleasant to have the old girls back and to see that 
they enjoy themselves. Alice Spruill was a welcome visitor early in 
the month. She is helping her father this winter. 

St. Mary's was glad to welcome back this year some of her ex-girls : 
Lucy Heyward of Columbia, and Myrtle Disosway of Newberne, were 
both at home last year. Maria Tucker who had to go home last year 
on account of her health came back this session, but ill health has again 
called her home, to our regret. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



And the little town groups are more noticeable this year than last. 
Wilmington has her twelve, the Henderson girls are back in force, and 
Charleston, Charlotte, Asheville, Oxford and Edenton, are all well 
represented. 

May Hane is at the Confederate Home School in Charleston this 
session; Mary Marriott at the Randolph-Macon Institute in Danville; 
and Eda Cunningham is attending Chatham Institute, Va., as a day 
pupil. We wish them each a very happy year. 

The Class of 1905 is more or less settled. Mamie Rossell, after 
recovering from her spell of typhoid, is with the Knowles' in Florida ; 
Bessie Poe Law is having a fine time teaching at Wilson's Mills; 
Anna Clark is very successful at Scotland Neck. 

The Sigma Lambda Literary Society officers for the Advent Term 
are: Virginia Bailey, President; Sue Prince, Vice-President; Jane 
I. Green, Secretary; Emily Garrison, Treasurer; Josephine Boylan, 
Critic; Grace Whitaker, Historian; Helen Strange and Blandina 
Springs, Tellers. 

The officers of the Epsilon Alpha Pi Literary Society for the Advent 
Term are: Gertrude Sullivan, President; Bettie Woolf, Vice-Presi- 
dent; Emma Barnwell, Secretary; Lottie Sharp, Treasurer; Lillian 
Farmer, Critic; Jessie Harris, Historian; Lucy Heyward and Ruth 
Foster, Tellers. 

St. Mary's is largely represented in the finishing schools of Wash- 
ington this winter. At Gunston are Marguerite Springs, Senah Critz 
Emmie Drewry, Dot Slocum and Mary Lee Robinson ; Susan Bynum, 
Ella Simmons and Willa Eorris, are at the Washington Seminary; 
and Lucy Sweet, Sara Jennings and Louise Evans, are at Bristol 
Institute. 

More than the usual number of the new girls come to us from other 
schools of the same grade. You may learn if you wish, of Gunston, 
of the Presbyterian College, of the College for Women, of Hampton 
College, and many others from those who know of them personally. On 
the other hand, we miss Elizabeth Wiggins, who is at her home in 
Sewanee ; the Thomsons, who are at the College for Women ; Ella Sim- 
mons, who has returned to the Washington Seminary, and the group of 
girls who have gone to Gunston. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Subscription, One Year. = = = = One Dollar. 

Single Copies. = = = = = Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, 
N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumnae, under the editorial management of the 
Senior Class. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 

Correspondence from friends solicited. raleigh, n. c. 



Editorial Board. 
Jane Iredell Geeen, Francis Elizabeth Woolf, 

Mary Thornton Lassitee, Annie Whitmee Sloane, 

Saea Geeteude Sullivan, Margaret Deveeeux Mackay. 

Harriet Elizabeth Ruff, 

Annie Eliza Koonce, 

Josephine Engelhard Boylan, 

Ruth Foster. 



Editorial. 

With this number of the Muse, a new class and a new Board of 
Editors take charge of our school paper. They are feeling their way 
slowly, and for this month publish the paper as a joint board. The 
editors extend greeting to the friends of The Muse and of St. Mary's 
— old and new, far and near, old and young — and ask the co-operation 
of each one in making the publication a lasting success. 



It is a pleasure to find so many of the old subscribers to The Muse 
ready to renew their subscriptions and to say a good word for the paper. 
We would also like to express to the new girls our appreciation of 
their co-operation in the matter of subscriptions. We are going to 
try to make The Muse a success in a business way as in other ways, 
and ask our friends to assist us here as elsewhere. 

Subscribe to the paper, write for the paper, patronize the adver- 
tisers whose liberal patronage makes the paper possible. 

We hope in the course of the next month, to welcome back each of 
our friends among the exchanges, and to greet many new ones. To 
each we extend our best wishes for a fruitful year for their papers, 
for their editors, and for their schools. 



8 The St. Mary's Muse. 

When this Muse reaches its readers the school session will be a 
month old, and the work of the year will be in full swing. An account 
of the opening is printed elsewhere. It did not differ in any essential 
respect from those of recent years — the buildings are full, the changes 
in person are numerous, there are numerous minor improvements — 
but' it is the St. Mary's of last year notwithstanding. We extend 
greetings to the newcomers to St. Mary's, and assure them again of 
our pleasure at having them with us; we would again tell old friends 
how good it is to be with them again, and say to those who are not 
here how much we miss them. We waft our good wishes to all and feel 
that all reciprocate. 



In Lighter Vein. 



Snipe Hunting as Told by One that was Bitten. 

It was a few nights after school had begun — a bright moonlight 
night that cast shadows far and near in the old grove at St. Mary's. 
Near Senior Hall a crowd of girls were huddling together getting ready 
for the hunt. "Oh, do be quiet, they will hear us and then we will 
eatch no snipes." There was a peal of laughter, and then we, the 
victims, heard some one say, "Pair off," and my room-mate went one 
way with two girls while two others took me. Oh it was going to be 
glorious — "but don't make any fuss for you might scare them away." 
"You never have tasted a snipe? They are fine." "Maybe Mrs. 
Seay will let us cook them for breakfast." "Now you stay here behind 
this stump and hold the bag while I go shoo them in. See, hold the 
bag this way and be sure not to hold it too high." 

By this time we had reached the middle of the grove, and with the 
parting injunction "Don't make a sound," they left me. For about 
five minutes I crouched down holding the bag as I had been told 
and then my foot went to sleep and I sat down. Another five minutes 
went by. I saw white forms flitting to and fro through the grove, and 
they seemed to me ghastly — then they went away one by one, and I 

wished they would come back again. There were so many shadows 

Why, was that a cigarette I saw? Taking a mighty long time to 
catch those snipes — I thought to myself. I stood up and looked around 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



no, not a soul in sight — must have been a joke! Then I felt a 

sickly smile come over my face, and walking hastily toward the build- 
ing I would fain have crept up the back way to my room and put my 
light out— no such good luck. "Hello, Snipe!" and there they came— 
the whole crowd, and in their midst my room-mate. And if we had 
never heard of snipe-hunting before it is needless to say that we shall 
ever hear of it henceforth. H. 

A Little Base Ball Enthusiast. 



My baby brother, who is only five years old, is very enthusiastic 
about base ball. He understands the principal rules of the game and 
knows all the terms. Last spring the Lexington Base Ball Team 
played a number of games with the teams of the neighboring towns 
and Teddy attended them all. Lexington always came off victorious, 
and of course that made the little fellow even more enthusiastic than be- 
fore. He was very fond of telling people that "Lexington beat." 

One afternoon, after he had been running around in the yard, he 
came into the house very much excited and declared that his heart was 
beating. Some one asked him: "Don't you know that your heart 
beats all the time?" "No, "said he indignantly, "Lexington beats all 
the time." Louise Hill. 

Any one desiring something new in hair tonics can apply to the 
"Virginia Girl." 

M. — after having recited several poems — sung songs and done num- 
erous other things, sinks into a chair and wearily remarks, "Well, is 
this initiation into the A. E. P. over?" 

One of the girls in the Snipe-hunting expedition was "in" with 
the crowd, but on account of some one failing to whistle for her as 
they had promised, she remained for two hours behind a stump. 

An old girl having passed the mail box several times and seeing 
each time one of the new girls standing there with letter in hand, 
asked her what she was waiting for. The new one smilingly replied, 
"Just waiting until half past four so I can mail my letter." 



ALUMNAE MATTERS 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 



President, - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

f Mrs. M. T. Leak, Durham. 

VTPF-PttT^TTWKTs J Mrs - x M - Pittenger, Raleigh, 
vice t-RESiDEiNTs, < Mrg F p Tucker Raleigh, 

[Mrs. Kate de R Meares, Wilmington. 

Sec.-Treas., - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's 



Editorial. 



In the Muse of May, 1905, was published the first of a series of 
articles about some of the women who have contributed to the making of 
St. Mary's as it is. In that first article it was a privilege and a pleas- 
ure to bring before the Muse reader that woman who, probably more 
than any other, has poured out her life and her talents in the interests 
of our school and its girls, and has ever given freely of herself to all 
that is uplifting and ennobling — Mrs. Iredell. In this issue we have 
the pleasure of speaking of another woman, one who never attended 
St. Mary's, nor knew it personally, but by whose generosity the State 
University and St. Mary's each benefited largely at her death, and 
whose name and good works are remembered here in four memorial 
scholarships — the Mary Euffin Smith Scholarships, — three of them be- 
longing to the Diocese of North Carolina, and one to the Diocese of 
East Carolina. 



An article on the life of Miss Smith is especially timely in this issue, 
when all the friends of St. Mary's are rejoicing over the more recent 
bequest of another woman, the late Mrs. Mary Eliza Pittman of 
Tarboro, by which the erection of the much needed auditorium is 
made possible. This benefaction closely parallels the one of Miss 
Smith, in that neither of them was made primarily to St. Mary's but 
rather to the Church and the cause of woman's education, and in the 
one case the trustees, in the other the trustee, decided that St. Mary's 
is the place where the will of the testator could be best carried out. 
The money from the Smith foundation was invested in the school 



The St. Mary's Muse. 11 

debt, and the four scholarships founded; the money from the Pittman 
bequest will be devoted to the Auditorium and two "Eliza Battle 
Pittman Scholarships" established. 

An essential difference lies in the fact that Miss Smith had never 
enjoyed the advantages which St. Mary's offers, while both Mrs. Pitt- 
man, (Mary Eliza Battle in her school days) and her daughter, Miss 
Eliza Battle Pittman, to whose memory the scholarships are established, 
were St. Mary's girls. 



There is another interesting link in connections with these matters 
in this Muse. The article on Miss Smith is from the pen of Dr. 
Kemp Battle of the chair of History at Chapel Hill, who, with his 
wife, were among Mrs. Smith's closest friends in her latter days; 
was her executor, and was most largely concerned in carrying out the 
provisions of her will. 

The services of the Battles to the State, the University, and to St. 
Mary's, need no mention here, but it is interesting to note that the 
same month in which Dr. Kemp Battle writes of Miss Smith comes 
the account of the bequest of Mrs. Pittman, who was also a member 
of the Battle family. 



We at St. Mary's thank Dr. Kemp Battle very sincerely for this 
article on Miss Smith; and we also wish to thank his brother, Hon. 
R. H. Battle, of our Board of Trustees, for the "Thursday talk" he 
recently gave us on the history of St. Mary's. We owe them both a deep 
debt of gratitude for many things and wish to acknowledge it. 



Mary Ruffin Smith, 1814-!885. 



Mary Puffin Smith was born in Hillsboro, the county-seat of Orange, 
in 1814. She was the only daughter of Dr. James S. Smith, a promi- 
nent physician who represented his county, when it was of extensive 
area, in the General Assembly and in the convention of 1835. He 
was likewise a representative in Congress and an active Trustee of the 
University. ISTear the close of his life he retired to a farm in the 
southern part of the county and lived the life of a farmer. 



12 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Miss Smith's mother was Delia Jones, daughter of Francis Jones 
of Chatham, a Lieutenant in the Revolutionary war, and owner of 
an extensive plantation, called the grove, part of which he offered for 
the site of the University. 

She was educated in the Hillsboro Female Academy, which was 
conducted under the general superintendency of Rev. Wm. Mercer 
Green, Eector of the Parish, afterwards Bishop of Mississippi. Its 
principal teacher was Miss Maria L. Spear, a very accomplished lady, 
who was her lifelong friend. When Miss Spear was waxing old, 
Miss Smith took her to her home, and the friends went down the hill 
of life together, the teacher crossing the river a few years only before the 
taught. Another of the teachers was the eminent Dr. Francis S. 
Hawks. It was by the influence of these three, Bishop Greer, Dr. 
Hawks and Miss Maria Spear, that Miss Mary was brought into the 
Episcopal church. 

In addition to the instruction of the school, she learned from her 
father and the eminent scientist, Rev. Dr. M. A. Curtis, about the 
plants useful in medicine, and their allied species. She had a large 
brain, and under these two gifted masters, was far better acquainted 
with the plants of the State than is usual even among our most accom- 
plished women. She read much in other branches, especially the liter- 
ature of our church, and what she read she retained in a memory of 
uncommon strength. 

About the middle of the century she removed with her father's 
family to her plantation near Chapel Hill, called Price's Creek. Here 
she resided until her death, November 13th, 1885, witnessing the 
deaths successively of mother, father, her two brothers and her friend, 
Miss Spear. She had no near relative, and nearly all of her intimate 
friends had preceded her to the grave. 

She evidently regarded herself as only a trustee of the land of 
Chatham, which she inherited from her brother, Dr. Frances Jones 
Smith, and, deducting therefrom a small tract for the benefit of two 
of her old slaves, she bequeathed the residue to our University for the 
benefit of poor students. After deducting for the benefit of other like 
legatees about one-fifth of the whole, she devised to the Diocese of 



The St. Masy's Muse. 13 



North Carolina, then embracing all the State, the residue of her home 
place, about 1,275 acres, together with all her personal property, sub- 
ject to certain legacies. The convention of the Diocese of North and 
East Carolina directed the land to be sold, the total amount realized 
being about $8,900, not including rents before sale. The personal 
property realized $13,708 in the total, or $6,854 to each Diocese. Such 
was her freedom from self-aggrandisement, that she expressed no wish 
for the perpetuation of her name in connection with her gift to the 
Church. But it has been wisely determined that at least part of it shall 
be used in lifting to a higher life daughters of our State, through the 
training of the great St. Mary's School. 

Mary Ruffin Smith was a woman of rare virtues. Her piety was 
sincere, her faith unswerving. Her judgment was quick, accurate 
and sound. Her acute moral sense detected all sophistry and went 
straight to the truth. When she formed a friendship it was for life. 
She had in large sense the Christian graces. Afflicted with an unusual 
amount of bitter trials she bore them with serenity and unbroken faith 
in the goodness of God. She was charitable without ostentation, did 
her duty always, but claiming no credit and desiring no praise. 
Quiet, gentle, reserved, she was firm as a rock in matters of principle, 
afraid of nothing but doing wrong. 

She is buried in the Jones' burial ground, which was excepted from 
the sale of the land bequeathed to the University, about half way be- 
tween Chapel Hill and Pittsboro. A beautiful white monument, in 
the shape of a cross, typical of that to which she so faithfully clung, 
is over her grave. Near her repose the bodies of the family for sev- 
eral generations. She was the last of her race — and the best. 

Kemp P. Battle. 

Alumnae Notes. 



The engagement is announced of Miss Placide Bridgers of Wil- 
mington, to the Rev. Robt. White of Atlanta. 

St. Mary's Mtjse — 

Deab Editors:— I am sending you the money for a year's subscription to the 
Mtjse. * * * I enjoyed Miss Thomas' article in the Mtjse very much, and am 
so sorry I didn't know that she was in New York, for I was there during July, 
and I would have loved to see her. 



14 The St. Mary's Muse. 

I enjoyed reading the Muse ever so much anyway, for I enjoy so many things 
that the girls are doing. I haven't seen any St. Mary's girls since June, because 
I was in New York and Pennsylvania all summer, you know. But now that I 
am back in Macon for all time, I am going to hunt up all the Georgia St. Mary's 
girls. 

But this was to be a "very business" letter and see how I have gone on. * * * 

Good-bye. With best wishes for good luck with your Muse, 

Kitty Coleman, '04. 

313 Orange St., Macon, Ga. 

The Merry Wedding Bells Ring On. 

The approaching marriage of Miss Carolyn A. B. Clark, of Augusta, 

Ga., to Mr. John Schley Hook, is announced for the twenty-fifth of 

October. Miss Clark is a member of the Class of '96, and has ever 

been true to her "alma mater." The Muse extends congratulations. 

Augusta, Ga., September 30. — (Special). — A beautiful out of town wedding, in 
which Augusta was much interested, took place Thursday evening at Beech 
Island, S. C, just across historic Sand Bar Ferry, over the Savannah River. 
Miss Helen Gladys Davies was the pretty bride and Mr. William Radford Eve the 
happy groom. The ceremony took place in the Presbyterian church at Beech 
Island, Rev. Dr. Jones, of Aiken, officiating. Both the church and the hospitable 
home of Mrs. Thomas Jones Davies, where the reception was held, were beauti- 
fully decorated for the happy occasion. At the wedding supper a special table 
decorated effectively with pink roses was occupied by the bridal party. Miss 
Harriet Davies was maid of honor to her sister. Beardin's orchestra furnished 
the music, both at the church and the house. 

OCTOBEB 7, 1905. 









READ !— MARK, I— ACT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



Established 1858 



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B. A. : "But haven't you a family that will ¥' 
Victim: "ISTo; no family — only a cat." 

B. A. : "And you don't need a good book to throw at the cat 
sometimes ?" 



/forth Carolina's Leading Dry Goods Store 

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(At Tucker's Store) 
123 and 125 Fayetteville Street 



Perfectly equipped mail order service. Cor- 
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cash mail orders amounting 

to 85.00 or more. 

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RALEIGH, N. C. 

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Advertisements. 






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KING'S GROCERY 

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216 FAYETTEVILLE STREET 

KING'S UP-TO-DATE DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN. 
Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets. 

You'll find up-to-date Shoes at 

HUNTER BROS. & BREWER. 



A Harvard Sophomore was reciting a memorized oration in one of 
the classes in public speaking. After the first two sentences, 
his memory failed, and a look of blank despair came over his face. He 
began as follows : 

"Ladies and Gentlemen: Washington is dead, Lincoln is dead" — 
then, forgetting, he hesitated a moment and continued, "and — I — I 
am beginning to feel sick myself." 



THE BOYLAN-PEARGE GO. 



Dry Goods, Millinery, 
Tailored Costumes, 
Gloves, Hosiery, 
Handkerchiefs, 
Fancy Goods, 
Underwear. 



Mail orders filled intelligently and promptly. 



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RALEIGH, ST. C. 



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Advertisements. 



FOR QUICK COOKING 
nothing exceeds the 

GAS RANGE 

ALWAYS READY. NO DIRT OR ASHES 

FOR LIGHT 

Use the best: THE WELSBAOH LIGHT 

STANDARD GAS AND ELECTRIC CO. 

124 Fayetteville St. 



YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 
121 Fayetteville Street. 

J. SCHWARTZ, 

RICHMOND MARKET. 

Meats of All Kinds. 
RALEIGH, N. C. 






A minister was earnestly urging one of his old parishoners to attend 
church oftener. When he had finished the old man said — "Well, Mr. 
Jordan, to tell you the truth, the reason I don't come oftener is because 
I snore so loud that I'm afraid that I will keep the rest of the congre- 
gation awake." 



CHARLES W. BARRETT- Architect 

Special Work in Pine Colonial Architecture. 

Author of 

"Colonial Southern Homes." 

115% Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 

PENN MUTUAL LIFE1NSURAnCET;OT" 
R. B. RANEY, General Agent, 

RALEIG H, N. C. 

GRIMES & VASS, 
Fire Insurance and Investments. 
Raleig h, N. C 

HELLER'S SHOE STORE. 

GYMNASIUM SHOES. 

RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK. 
Capital 815,000 Surplus 825,000. Deposits over 
8600,000. Four percent interest paid on deposits. 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON, 

COAL, WOOD AND ICE. 

122 Fayetteville St Raleigh, N. C. 



E. M. UZZELL & CO., 

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Advertisements. 



SAL VA TORE DESIO, 

Manufacturing- Jeweler and Silversmith. 

1012 F. St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

On application will send any articlt selected. 
To St. Mary's, discount of ten per cent. 

J. S. MacDONALD & CO., Jewelers. 

Diamonds, Watches, Clocks, Silverware, 

Jewelry, Class Rings, Medals and 

Badges to order. 

217 N. Charles St. Baltimore, Md. 

DIAMONDS, WATCHES, SILVERWARE ; 
H. SILVERTHORN CO, 
917 Main Street, Lynchburg, Va. 
Manufacturers of College Medals, Class Rings 
and Pins. 



ELLINGTON'S ART STORE, 
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Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs. 

For the most satisfactory work, 

Try RIGGSBEE at 
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Rich Jewelry and Silverware. 

Repairing promptly done. 

JOLLY & WYNNE JEWELRY COMPANY, 
Wedding and Holiday presents. 
Fine Watch and Jewelry repairing. 






A man was traveling through the country for the purpose of finding 
the membership of the different denominations. Meeting an old far- 
mer he asked him if there were any Episcopalians in the neighborhood. 
The old man thought a moment and replied : "Wall, I'm not sure, 
but Ike shot a mighty queer critter down in the swamp tother day, and 
maybe that was one of 'urn." 



A . D U G H I , 

RESTAURANT AND ICE CREAM PARLOR. 

Confections, Foreign and Domestic Fruits. 

CATERER. 

St. Mary's folks know and approve of Dnghi. 

Good things always at 

BRETSCH'S BAKERY. 

Buy ROYvSTER'S Fine Candies. 

Private Dining and Banquet Halls at 

GIERSCH'S, 216 Fayetteville St. 



CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

At J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 

Leading Florists of North Carolina. 
Raleigh, N. C. 

H. STEINMETZ, 

FLORIST. 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns and all kinds , 

Raleigh.] of Plants. [Phone 113 . 

RQBT SIMPSON, Drugs ^itIr u tB, «*. 

JNO. P. HAYES, Photographer. 

Kodak work of all kinds. 



ANTICEPHALA.LG1NE cures quickly and 
safely Headache in all its forms. 



Advertisements 



The National Bank of Raleigh, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Capital 5225,000. Surplus and Profits $115,000. 

Chas. H Belvin, President. 

Chas. E. Johnson, Vice-President. 

F. H. Briggs, Cashier 

J. B. Tihberlake, Teller and Ass't Cashier. 

Safe Deposit Boxes in Fire aDd Burglar Proof 
Vault for rent at moderate cost. Absolutely 
safe place for keeping valuables of all kinds. 

THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

If its furnishing the Home, Office, School or 

Hall, see us. 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 

Cor. Wilmington and Hargett Streets, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Sfrtik 



1 



COFFEE 

h BISTGROC£J?S" 



Our ECCLESIASTICAL ART Department is 
superbly equipped for the prompt and proper 
execution of fine church work such as Altars, 
Pulpits, Lecturns, Prayer Desks, Litany 
Desks, Rood Screens, Fonts, and similar 
furnishings. Write for special church fur- 
niture catalogue. 

HANN-WANGERIN-WEICKHARDT CO., 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

THE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY, 

Holiday Goods. 

GEO. MARSH & CO., 
Wholesale groceries, Produce, Fruit, 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



ELLINGTON LUMBER COMPaNY, 

All Sorts of Building Supplies, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Don't forget to buy your Shoes of 

S. C. POOLE'S Shoe Store. 



PERRY & ROSENTHAL, Trust Bldg. 
Ladies' Fine Shoes. 

Dr. V. E. TURNER, 
Dentist. 

J. R. FERRALL & CO.— Grocers 

Best cf everything in our line. 

22 Fayetteville Street. 

JOHN C. DREWRY. 
" MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE." 



We make your shopping with us "pleasant" 
as well as "profitable." 

A. B. STRONACH COMPANY. 

Outfitters for Ladies, Misses and Children. 
Commencement Dress Materials and Acces- 
sories—Gloves, Fans, Hosiery, Shoes,— receive 
our special attention. 

215 Fayetteville Street. 

STAPLE AND FANCY^ROCERIES . 
Fruits, Vegetables and Country Pro- 
duce. The best of everything and at rock 
bottom prices. Special prices to schools and 
colleges. D. T. JOHNSON & SONS 

P hone 78. 163 Hargett St . 

MISSES REESE & COMPANY, 

Millinery. 



Advertisements. 



October 



5. 
12. 

17. 
18. 
21. 

26. 
28. 
30. 



November 1. 

4. 

9. 

11. 



School Program. 



October-November, 1905. 
Thursday Talk: Hon. R. H. Battle on the "History of St 



Miss Shipp on "Woman in 



Mary's." 
the English Univer- 



Thursday Talk: 
sities." 

Tuesday Evening: Miss Annie Blalock, Interpretative Reader. 

Wednesday Afternoon: Annual Visit to the State Fair. 

Saturday Evening: Annual Reception of the Sigma Lambda Lit- 
erary Society to its new members. 

Thursday Morning: Pres. Geo. Winston, N. C. A. & M. College. 

Saturday Evening: "Social Evening." 

Monday Evening: Faculty Recital. Mrs. Irvine, pianist, and Miss 
Cribbs, elocutionist. 

Tuesday Evening: Annual Halloween Celebration. 

All Saints': Annual Celebration of Founders' Day. Holy Day. 

Saturday Evening: Chapter Entertainment. 

Thursday Morning: 

Saturday Evening: Lecture: Prof. Gilbert Pearson of the State 
Normal College, on "The Birds of North Carolina," 






/ 

AIR LINE RAILWAY. 

The Shortest and Quickest Route Between North 
and South. 

DOUBLE DAILY SERVICE from New York to Florida points, 
Norfolk, Portsmouth to Atlanta and the principal cities of the 
South. Through Pullman services New York to Jacksonville and 
Tampa; also Atlanta, with direct connections for New Orleans, 
Nasbvi'le, Birmingham, Memphis, St.Louis, and all points in Texas, 
California and Mexico. 

LOCAL SERVICES. Special attention is called to our conven- 
ient local passenger service throughout the entire system. 

For schedule to any point, rates, time-tables, pamphlets, reser- 
vations or general information, apply to ticket agents or address, 



C. H. GATTIS, T. P. A. 



C. B. RYAN, G. P. A. 



RALEIGH. N. C. PORTSMOUTH, VA. 

H. A. MORSON, C. P and T. A. 



> 7 7 • 

Location Central for the Caromtas. 

Climate Healthy and 'Salubrious. 



t. Mar y's School, 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



{for girls and young women). 



Ith ANNUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER 21, 1905. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 25, 1996. 



rs instruction, in these 
Departments: 



1. THE COLLEGE. 

% THE MUSIC SCHOOL. 

B. THE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 

i THE ART SCHOOL, 

5, THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 



1 905-06 are enrolled 225 students from 13 Dioceses. 

Twentv-five Members in the Faculty. 



hed, Progressive Music Department Much Equipment New. Twenty-eight 

Pia nos. New Miller Grand Piano Just Added, 
tl attention to theSocial andCJiristian Side of Education without slight 
scholastic training^ 

Catalogue and other information address 

.R*v:kcNeely DuRose, B. " : S.i& D. 

RECTOR. 



The St. 

HALLOW ET.H 5ER. 



Vol. X. November, 1905. No. 4. 



Founders' Day, 1905. 



The first of November is not only the All Saint's Day of the general 
Church, but for St. Mary's it is Founder's Day, the day of special re- 
membrance of those saints whose life-energies have been so freely given 
to her upbuilding. It is emphatically a holy day, when, the regular 
duties suspended, the hearts of all at St. Mary's turn naturally to the 
Chapel, which is always particularly beautiful in its glowing autumn 
decorations, bright emblems of the richness and fulness of life that 
passes but does not die. 

The All Saints' service this year was especially sweet and impressive. 
The Chapel itself serves always to remind at once of the past and the 
present, of those who have done their work and those whose work is 
yet incomplete. With all the improvements of the new building, the 
memorials of those who are gone and yet are present in spirit still have 
the prominent place which is rightly theirs. The chancel, the organ, 
the chapel furnishings, the memorial windows each serve as constant 
reminders of those who have loved and those who do love St. Mary's, 
and at All Saints' the service is especially dedicated to the memory of 
those who have "gone before." This year this service had a special 
significance, for at it the first offering was taken to start a fund which 
on its completion will be used to purchase a new altar to take the place 
of that one which has had its place for so many years in the old chapel, 
and which is now too small for present needs. An account of this 
plan will be found further over in this Muse. 

At the service, in a few well chosen words, Mr. DuBose explained the 
significance of the day, and spoke of the Saints of God, not only of 
those whose names are in the Church Calendar, but also of those who 
by that mysterious thing called character made by the indwelling 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



of Christ in their hearts have left their impress upon those who came 
in contact with them in life, and, who, though gone before, have led the 
way to higher things for those "who follow in their train." Such are 
Drs. Albert and Bennett Smedes, whose works live after them, for 
many a St. Mary's daughter throughout the Southland owes the inspira- 
tion of her spiritual life to the words and to the example of these two 
great men who gave themselves wholly to God and left St. Mary's a liv- 
ing memorial to their efforts. 



The Founder of St. Mary's— The Rev, Aldert Smedes, D.D. 



The recent gift of an Auditorium to St. Mary's from the estate 
of one of her pupils of the forties has turned our thoughts backward, 
to the early days of the school and to its founder and first rector. 

The name and memory of Dr. Aldert Smedes is loved and honored 
in thousands of homes throughout the South and we feel impelled to 
tell the present generation of St. Mary's girls something of the charac- 
ter and work of this good man of great love and noble deeds. 

Dr. Aldert Smedes was born on the 20th of April, 1810. in the city 
of New York. His father was Abraham Kiersted Smedes, a commis- 
sion merchant of Dutch ancestry; and his mother was Eliza Sebor 
Isaacs. Though the parents of Dr. Smedes lived for some years in 
Kentucky, they were so identified with New York, that after the death 
of her husband, Mrs. Smedes removed to that city to educate her 
family of seven sons and two daughters. 

The writer, when a child, knew and greatly admired Dr. Smedes' 
mother, who several times visited her son at St. Mary's. She lived 
to a ripe old age, loved and revered by her sons and daughters. 

Dr. Smedes was educated at Columbia College, there studied law, 
and later entered the General Theological Seminary in New York, to 
prepare for his life work. After his ordination to the ministry, he 
was for several years assistant to the Kev. Thomas Lyell, D.D., rector 
of Christ Church, New York. On July ,18th, 1833, he was married 
in that church by Bishop Benj. Onderdonk, to Sarah Pierce, daughter 
of Dr. Lyell, and granddaughter of the Rev. Abraham Beach, D. D., 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



who was in the early part of the last century one of the Clergy of 
Trinity Church Parish. 

Soon after his marriage, Dr. Smedes was called to St. George's, 
Schenectady. There he so endeared himself to his congregation that 
when he developed a serious throat trouble, they sent him abroad for 
a year to restore his health. His travels in Europe and the Holy 
Land, while they did not remove a physical disability which troubled 
him more or less through life, stored his mind and memory with 
material for use in his future work. Singularly alive as he was to 
impressions of grandeur and beauty in nature and art, Europe supplied 
him with a continuous panaorama which he could unfold at pleasure. 
And, with strong religious sensibilities, he was so impressed by his 
sojourn in Palestine, that its mountains, lakes, and rivers, the Holy 
City, the Temple Site, Bethlehem, Gethsemane, Calvary, became vivid 
realities to his pupils in his teaching of the Scriptures, — not by any 
descriptive use, but by those touches and allusions which carry you 
along insensibly with one who has seen with the eyes of his soul. 

The severity of the climate of Schenectady forced Dr. Smedes to 
Ibave his first parish, and before he was again located, he met in the 
spring of 1842, in the streets of New York, Bishop Ives, the second 
bishop of the Diocese of North Carolina. Hearing that Bishop Ives 
was in search of a clergyman to open a Church School in Raleigh, 
and that buildings were ready, and only the man was wanting, 
Dr. Smedes at once offered himself. The strong faith which through- 
out his life was so evident to those who knew him best, and a zeal 
for good which his whole career at St. Mary's evinced, must have 
guided him in this step. For, in two months time he was in Raleigh 
to open St Mary's and, with no other assurance of success financially 
than the promise of Bishop Ives to use his influence in the diocese. On 
May 12th, 1842, St. Mary's life began with the blessing of God upon 
it, and through the untiring zeal and energy of its rector it passed 
through the fiery trials of the war and the dark days following,- — its 
doors never closing, — to carry on its work. 

An innate knowledge of human nature guided Dr. Smedes in his 
choice of assistants when he came to St. Mary's. Madame Clement 
was one of these, and Mrs. Smedes, whose zeal kept pace with his, 

Saffit Mary's School iMm 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



was of the greatest help to him. In health she gave of all that was hers, 
a bright mind, a rich humor, and an unfailing cheerfulness and sym- 
pathy. This ready help never failed until her heart was well-nigh 
broken and her health quite undermined by her grief in the death of 
her sons. 

In the management of his school, Dr. Smedes was kind, wise, gen- 
erous, just, acknowledging merit, pitying weakness, and demanding 
faithfulness in teachers and pupils. As a teacher Dr. Smedes excelled. 
He had a strong way of putting things in simple words which clung to 
the memory, and his style was never diffuse. In its epigrammatic char- 
acter his words often had the force of a proverb. This was most remark- 
able in his teaching of the Bible, and I do not doubt that many of his 
pupils could use his very words in the explanation of some passage from 
the weekly Bible lesson, and in his teaching them to give a reason for the 
faith that was in them. He knew and loved the Scriptures, and so earn- 
est and zealous was he in his efforts .to teach his girls "the things which 
make for peace," and to show them the duties and responsibilities of 
Christian women, that many girls left St, Mary's imbued with the spirit 
and zeal whch make missionaries. 

In the winter of '89 and '90, Bishop Garrett, of Texas, wrote to Dr. 
Bennett Smedes to ask that he would inform him regarding his father's 
methods of "teaching the Scriptures and indoctrinating" his girls. 
"For," said he, "T find all over my diocese the beginnings of Sunday 
Schools and Churches, the work of St. Mary's women, and am de- 
termined to establish a Church School as the best means of building 
up my diocese." And he did. That school we may regard as one 
of the. fruits of Dr. Smedes' work at St. Mary's. About a year ago, 
I met "an old St. Mary's girl" who now lives in Texas, and whose 
daughter is at Bishop Garrett's School. She spoke in glowing terms 
of the good work done there. 

Of the work of Dr. Smedes for the Church in Uorth Carolina and 
throughout the South, enough cannot be said. His work was founded 
in faith, carried on in love, and with a generosity without stint. 
Wherever there was need and he believed that good could be accom- 
plished, he sowed his seed, looking to Him "who giveth the increase," 
for the harvest. In his address to the Diocesan Convention, a month 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



after the death of Dr. Smedes, Bishop Atkinson said, "I take this 
occasion to express publicly, as my deliberate judgment, that I)r. 
Smedes accomplished more for the advancement of the Church in this 
diocese, and for the promotion of the best interests of society within 
its limits, than any other man who ever lived in it." The testimony 
of Bishop Cheshire to his worth follows: "Dr. Smedes represented 
to my mind the best results, not only of the social, but of the intellectual 
culture of a day when general intellectual culture, as distinguished 
from special technical training, was perhaps more common in the higher 
classes of men than to-day. * * * He lived the Christian life, 
and the life in him had the quality of all true life, that it quickened 
life in others. * * * Dr. Smedes had the enthusiasm of his noble 
calling, and with him teaching was taking the child-mind and character 
and bringing it into sympathetic contact with his own personality, to 
impart to it the best of his own intellectual and spiritual possessions." 

In the trying times that followed the war, the noble generosity of 
Dr. Smedes, always known, became more apparent. He gave thou- 
sands every year to keep up the school. His unusual executive and 
financial ability had made the school a material success, and he felt 
that money made and happily invested in brighter times must not be 
withheld in the day of need. He loved his work, his girls, his St. 
Mary's that he had made, and anxious thoughts for her future some- 
times darkened his latter days, for he had not succeeded in his re- 
peated efforts to acquire the property. He did not know with what 
devoted love his son and successor would carry on his work, and that 
a grateful diocese would finally make the work its own on an enduring 
basis. 

Dr. Smedes died April 25th, 1877, having held the reigns of govern- 
ment, taught his classes, and ministered in the chapel to the end. 

Perhaps, before he passed from death unto life, from the mountain- 
top of an uplifting faith, he may have had some vision of hopes ful- 
filled for his beloved St. Mary's. 

Mary Iredeee. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Leonore. 

Through sunset glow and twilight haze 

I hunted for my darling, 

Calling, "Oh Sweetheart come, my own dear love, 

My Leonore." 

I found her by the water's edge, 
Among the rushes of the shore — 
That form so frail lay outstretched there; 
The auburn tresses of her hair 
Were mingled with the sedge. 

With tender care I lifted her, 

Dead Leonore. 

Touching those eyes to smile no more 

I seemed to feel a stifled breath, 

And gently set my burden down — 

No longer feigning death; 

I looked into those opening eyes — so soft, so brown, 

And smiling said, "You wicked, tricky dog, 

My Leonore." Serena C. Bailey. 



The State Fair, October 17-20, 1905. 



The rhymester saw it thus: 

We went to the "Great State Fair"; 

A number of people were there. 

As the band played a tune 
We watched a balloon 
Ascending high up in the air. 

The merry-go-rounds so swift; 

And the Ferris wheels gave us a lift 

Then we walked down the "Trail," 
Buying what was for sale — 
Getting many a knock as a gift. M. 

And it appeared thus to the New Girl: 

On Thursday, the 19th, the President was to visit Kaleigh and attend 
the Fair ; for that reason we girls at St. Mary's had to go on Wednes- 
day in order to avoid the crush of the next day. 

We went out in squads, each under the direction of a teacher. When 
we assembled about mid-day to take the cars, some one proposed that 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



we should get on them as they came back from the Fair grounds and ride 
down to the Capitol Square, and so be sure of having seats. It was a 
bright idea, for there was not a vacant place when the car started on 
its way back. 

When we went through the gate and were in the midst of the Fair 
I found it very different from what I had expected ; the combination of 
the jostling crowd and side shows made it seem to me much like a circus. 
Everything around was horribly hot and dusty. Confetti and banana 
skins were very noticeable. It seemed that all sorts and conditions 
of men were gathered together in a jolly crowd under no restraint. 

Men painted and spotted stalked about carrying trinkets and bal- 
loons, shouting to the passers-by to purchase from them, while they 
poked their wares into your very faces. "Squeedunks" and small tin 
horns could be got for a trifle, and each one seemed to try who could 
make the most noise with them. One had not really entered into the 
spirit of the occasion unless one had a souvenir cane striped with red, 
white and blue. 

Groups of school girls flocked into the interesting and enticing booths 
stopping on the way to regale themselves with "fluff candy," a novel 
arrangement to make one think one is getting a great deal out of noth- 
ing. The candy looked very much like pink cotton, and when it was 
eaten turned into absolutely nothing in your mouth. And even our 
"dignified seniors," as they were drawn along in the throng had no 
scruples whatever in eating ice cream put up in cones made of "French 
cake." Fortune tellers, palmists, tin-type takers were everywhere, 
-while owners of shows stood in the doors and called out in loud tones, 
and often through a megaphone, literally hauling people in to see thelj 
exhibitions ; each declaring that his was the best in all the Fair, and the 
cheapest for the enjoyment gotten from it. Numerous gaudy or strik- 
ing, if not always attractive, signs pointed out where were to be seen 
trained animals, champion swimmers, dancing girls, human freaks, or 
statues turning to life. In one many colored tent, many adventurers 
were bewildered in the windings of the ever-to-be-found "Mystic Maze." 
The chosen pleasure of Saint Mary's girls, however, seemed to be riding 
on one or the other of the two Ferris wheels. 

The horse races were no doubt very interesting, though not to Be 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



seen by the late comer, for the railing around the track was packed with 
the same jolly good-natured crowd that was to be found everywhere. 

It all did seem very jolly. The air was buzzing with the sounds 
of the merry-go-round and of the orchestra which played at intervals 
while the races were going on. It meant nothing at all to have a big 
slap on the back from some laughing person hurrying past, or a blow 
with one of the yellow yard-sticks generously supplied by some mer- 
chant, for every rough joke was expected to be taken in good part. 

I have almost forgotten to mention the exhibition of the Fair — that 
of the industry and manufacturing enterprises of the State, — but I 
fancy that only a few thought this was such a feature as the ascent of 
the big balloon which went up most successfully. 

Our party had its full share in the fun and we enjoyed ourselves 
hugely, though we were quite ready to come back to St. Mary's about 
half after five. ]\£ J$ 



SCHOOL NEWS. 

Josephine Boylan, Editor. Annie E. Koonce, Editor. 



With the Sigma Lambda Literary Society. 

The Sigma Lamda Society has gotten well started in the work of 
the new session and hopes from this time on with the active encourage- 
ment and assistance of Miss Thomas to advance further and further in 
the lines of its work and to have a most prosperous year. The new 
members, in goodly number, have been received and a simple recep- 
tion was tendered them on the evening of the 21st of October. At the" 
meeting on the evening of November 1, the program was devoted to 
Lanier and his works. On the 15th the debate was on the question, 
"Resolved: That Japan conceded too much to Russia in the Treaty 
of Portsmouth.' 7 

Misses Klingensmith and Gregory took the affirmative view, while 
Misses S. Bailey and Disosway defended the negative. 

The officers of the Society during the present term are: Virginia 
Bailey, President; Sue Prince, Vice-President; Jane I. Green, Secre- 
tary; Emily Garrison, Treasurer; Josephine Boylan, Critic; Grace 
Whitaker, Historian; Helen Strange and Blandina Springs, Tellers. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



The active members for 1905 — '06, include : Misses Albright, H. 
Ashe, Atkinson, S. Bailey, V. Bailey, Bowen, Boylan, Garrison, Cohen, 
G. Cooper, Corbett, Crews, Crosswell, A. Davis, DeRosset, Disosway, 
DuBose, Eldridge, Emerson, Gary, Green, Gregory, Henderson, Hut- 
chison, Ivey, S. Jones, Klingensmith, Koiner, F. Lee, Liddell, London, 
Mackay, V. Miller, Brince, Robinson, Rosser, Seay, Shelburn, Short, 
Simmons, Springs, Stedman, Strange, Webb, G. Whitaker, Wilson, 
J. Winston. 



THE SIGMA LAMBDA RECEPTION. 

On the night of Saturday, October the twenty-first, the annual re- 
ception of the Sigma Lambda Literary Society to its new members was 
held in the "Far Countree." Besides the old and new members, the 
Epsilon Alpha Fi officers were invited. 

The officers of the society received their guests in the hall which 
with the French room Avas very artistically decorated with autumn 
leaves and flowers. Around the sides of the French room, divans and 
pillows were tastefully arranged and a further transformation in the 
appearance of the room was effected by the numerous pennants on the 
walls. 

Delicious refreshments, consisting of fruit punch, fruit salad, olives 
and cheese crackers were served. 

Miss Cribbs added very much to the pleasure of the evening when she 
gave an impromptu recitation. Her little pieces were very interesting, 
and her manner delightfully natural and charming. S. C. B. 



SIGMA LAMBDA PROGRAM, NOVEMBER 1, 1905. 

The History of the Society Miss Whitaker. 

Lanier's "The Bee" Miss DuBose. 

Lanier's "Revenge of Hamish" Miss V. Miller. 

The Life of Lanier Miss Short. 



THE HISTORY OF THE SOCIETY. 

In April, 1900, at Dr. Bratton's suggestion, the English classes at 
St. Mary's were formed into two Literary Societies. 

9, 



10 The St. Mary's Muse. 



The names of the Societies, Sigma Lambda and Epsilon Alpha Pi, 
are the Greek initial letters of the Southern poets, Sidney Lanier, and 
Edgar Allen Poe. 

The Sigma Lambda adopted as their colors, purple and grey, because 
of their being the combined colors of North Carolina and Georgia — 
and, as their flower, at Miss Lowd's suggestion, yellow jessamine ; while 
one of Lanier's quotations "Lit with the sun," became the motto. 

The meetings of the society are held on every first and third Wed- 
nesday of the month, and its purpose is to broaden the mind by general 
discussions, and to promote literary tastes and interest among its mem- 
bers. It was not until the fail of 1901, that the society was in good 
working order, but since then much work has been done. In 1901, the 
Sigma Lambda sent the first inter-society challenge to the E. A. P., 
but this was not acted upon that year. In 1902, the E. A. P. challenged 
the Sigma Lambda to a debate to be held before the whole school, and 
in this debate the Sigma Lambda proved that "Poetry has clone more 
lor the development of mankind than Prose." In 1903, the Sigma 
Lambda challenged the E. A. P. and proved that "Man has done 
more for the world than Woman" ; this debate was remarkable for the 
fine impression made by the debaters on both sides, a standard being 
then set which the Sigma Lambda desires to perpetuate. In 1904, when 
the Sigma Lambda wished to show that the victory of Japan would 
be more advantageous to the world than that of Ptussia, the decision 
was in favor of Russia. Last year the inter-society debate was an 
interesting one. The Sigma Lambda proved that the indiscriminate 
education of all classes is productive neither of discontent nor of evil 
to the individual or society. 

The society has done much for the literary life of St. Mary's, and 
its members are loyal and devoted and never more so than this year. 



All Hallowe'en. 

All Hallowe'en is perhaps the most exciting time of all the school year 
at St. Mary's. Eor weeks beforehand you hear girls asking, "What 
are you going as, on Hallowe-en ?" and the answer, "Wait and see." 
This year was no exception to the rule. Everyone seemed to be excited ; 
all were planning and preparing for the great event. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 11 



At eight o'clock all assembled in the school room to get in line for the 
"grand march." There were shrieks of laughter from all sides, as the 
"Faculty, very cleverly represented, headed the procession. After 
them came "The Whole Dam Family," "Happy Hooligan," Gloomy 
Gus," (and of course the policeman), clowns, fairies, old negro women, 
Italian organ grinders with their monkeys, flowers of all kinds, the 
Gold Dust Twins, awful looking ghosts, — one of them especially, very 
tall and dreadful looking, whom no one could recognize, — Colonial 
dames, Gypsies, country girls, and many others too numerous to men- 
tion. 

Miss Sutton played the march and the procession solemnly made its 
way around the parlor. Above the sound of laughing and talking and 
the cry of "Eat Cream of Wheat," the orders of the "Faculty," the 
blowing of horns, etc., could be heard astonished exclamations, such as, 
"Why look at Annie Wells and Beatrice Cohen," "and there is Anna 
Waugh!" and sure enough there were some of the teachers, dressed as 
girls. 

The "old girls" had been wondering what on earth we were going 
to do without Miss Checkley, who, while she was at St. Mary's, always 
took such an interest and such an important part in the program, 
working for weeks before hand to prepare surprises and pleasures for 
the girls. But we were not kept long in suspense, for after the march 
was over all were requested "to sit down on the floor," and lo, there 
came an exhibition of Mrs. Jarley's waxworks. 

A great many of Mrs. Jarley's best works were brought out, despite 
the fact that she was so afraid of having them broken. Mrs. Jarley 
got off some very clever "hits" on both teachers and girls, and her two 
assistants, Lazy Slum and Little Nell, afforded a great deal of 
amusement for the crowd. Ice cream and cake was served after the 
exhibition of the wax works. 

But as there is an end to all things, so there came an end to this, and 
all too soon, the bell rang for us to disperse. All Hallowe'en was 
over, and I think that each girl went to her building that night feeling 
that she had had the "time of her life," and making up her mind to 
observe All Saint's Day, which for us is Founder's Day as well, a 



12 The St. Mary's Muse. 

little more carefully than she had heretofore, for Mr. DuBose had im- 
pressed on the minds of all, the fact that but for All Saint's Day, there 
would be no Hallowe'en. R. F. 

This was the cast in " Jarley" : 

Mrs. Jarley Miss Fenner. 

Laz ^ Slum } her assistants j Emma Barnwe11 " 

Little Nell > { Annie Wood. 

THE FIGURES. 

The Bear Trainer and his Bear Jane I. Green and Bettie Woolf 

The Fairy Queen Margaret "Wilson 

Jack Sprat and his "Wife Irving Morgan and Nathalie Dotterer 

Buster Brown and Tige Myrtle Powell and R. DuBose 

Organ Grinder and his Monkey Mary Spruill and Ella Croft 

The Parisian Dolls Betsie London and Ellen Duvall 

The Darkey Singers, Elise Emerson, Christine Klingensmith, and Jessie Chapman 

"Wego, the Wild Girl Georgia Hales 

The Parisian Singer Grace Whitaker 

The Fat Boy Bessie Watts 



The President's Visit. 

We were all much interested in the visit of the President on the 
Thursday of Fair Week. In order to have a double holiday and avoid 
the crowd of "Roosevelt Day" at the Fair, we had school on Monday, 
ordinarily a free day, and went to the Fair on Wednesday instead of 
Thursday. All were accordingly quite ready to see and greet the 
President as he passed the grove Thursday morning on his way to the 
Fair grounds. 

We gathered in force near the summer house about eleven and had 
no time to wait. The procession, with its host of marshals and mili- 
tary display, was quite imposing, but of course the centre of attraction 
were the President and Mrs. Roosevelt. As the marshals passed they 
halted for a moment and cheered us heartily, a compliment which was 
much appreciated, and when the President came, (led by Mr. Stone) 
we saluted him with the Harvard "Rahs." Pie seemed much pleased 
with his reception and bowed most graciously. 

A moment and he was gone, and yet we have a pleasant recollection 
of his visit and are heartily glad that we saw him. 






The St. Mary's Muse. 13 



The Month's Recitals. 



MISS ANNIE BLALOCK. 

The event of the greatest interest in the week of October 15, was the 
recital on Tuesday evening of Miss Annie Blalock, of Atlanta, lecturer 
and interpretative reader. Miss Blalock, a Georgia woman, a grad- 
uate and for years a teacher at the Emerson School of Oratory in 
Boston, returned two years ago to her native State to devote her ener- 
gies to the South. She is a most pleasing lecturer, and is highly 
esteemed by some of the most competent authorities. 



FACULTY RECITAL. 

The recital at St. Mary's on Monday evening, October 30, given 
by Mrs. Irvine and Miss Cribbs, new members of the faculty, was in 
every way a success. 

Mrs. Irvine's playing is characterized by ease of technique and by 
that indescribable quality called "style," which reflects the study with 
great masters, and reveals the true artist. The difficult "Etude" by 
Henselt- Joseffy, was played with a rare touch and brilliant technique ; 
the "Berceuse," by Chopin, was given with exquisite delicacy and ten- 
derness, and the "Valse," by Moszkowski with bounding rhythm. But 
Mrs. Irvine was at her best in the "Etude," and "Waklesrauschen," by 
Liszt, where her individuality of interpretation was most marked and 
effective. It needed but the dainty minuet which she played for an 
encore to complete the effect of this number of the programme. 

Miss Cribbs was charming, both in her stage presence and in her 
rendering of the varied selections, the audience being especially pleased 
with "Pauline Pavlovna," and "Mam'selle," and the attractive encores. 

The full program was : 

a. Little Boy Blue Field-Nevin 

b. Pass Under the Rod Dana-Scott 

c. Aux Italiens Meredith-Verdi 

MISS CRIBBS 

a. Etude Henselt- Joseffy 

b. Berceuse Chopin 

c. Valse Moszkowski 

MRS. HABRISON-IRVINE 



14 The St. Mary's Muse. 

a. Pauline Pavlovna Anon 

b. Mam'selle Anon 

MISS CRIBBS 

a. Etude Liszt 

b. Waldesrauchen Liszt 

MBS. HARBISON-IRVINE 



School Notes. 



Julia Winston spent Wednesday and Thursday of Fair week at her 
home in Oxford. 

Jessie Harris and Mary Perry spent the last few days of October 
at their homes in Henderson. 

Jennie Morris' father, Mr. C. E. Morris, of Tuscaloosa, Ala., spent 
several days with her the past week. 

Margaret Mackay has been absent from school for some time, suffer- 
ing with an attack of malarial fever. 

Betsey London's mother was here for Hallowe'en and All Saints' 
Day. How the other girls did envy Betsey. 

Maria Webb and Josephine Boylan went to Hillsboro November 
17th, to a bird supper that was given by Maria's brother. 

Jane Iredell Green went home on Wednesday, November 15th, to 
attend the marriage of her brother, Dr. Thomas Green, to Miss Emma 

West. 

The enthusiasm over the Carolina — A. & M. — football game was at 
fever heat. The drawn game prevented a one-sided rejoicing and all 
were content. 

Miss Cribbs recited on the 13th at the recital for the benefit of the 
sufferers at the Catholic Orphanage, which recently suffered such a 
disastrous fire. 

Miss Hull and Miss Pixley chaperoned a large party to the Baptist 
University on the 14th to hear the Schubert Quartet. All enjoyed the 
evening greatly. 

Bessie Dixon and Addie Norman, of Edenton, were with our Edenton 
girls during Eair week. We hope they will themselves be St. Mary's 
girls another year. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 15 



Mrs. Dotterel* of Charleston, and Mrs. Waddill of Cheraw, were with 
their daughters for brief visits during the past month. 

Marguerite Springs and Mary Robinson, who are at Grunston, went to 
the October Hop at Annapolis; of course each says that she had the 
"time of her life." 

Dorothy Hughson, '05, spent a few days at St. Mary's during the 
last, part of October. We were delighted to see her and to welcome her 
to Senior Hall again. 

A large number of our teachers are interested in the Teachers' Club 
of Raleigh, recently organized as an aid in the promotion of the school 
influence in the city. 

A party of the Seniors and Juniors, chaperoned by Mr. DuBose, en- 
joyed Charles Battell Loomis, the humorist, at A. and M. College on 
the evening of the 4th. 

Alice Davis went home on November 11th, to attend the marriage 
of her brother, Mr. Thomas Davis, to Miss Anna Peck. The wedding 
took place in Wilmington. 

A good many of the St. Mary's girls expect to attend the Carolina- 
Virginia foot ball game in Norfolk, Thanksgiving Day, and are look- 
ing forward to having a fine time. 



St. Monica's Chapter. 



The first of the annual Chapter entertainments was a Japanese Tea, 
given by St. Monica's Chapter (Miss Katie's Dormitory), on the 
evening of Saturday, November 4th. 

On entering the parlor one felt as if she had suddenly been trans- 
ported from the walls of St. Mary's to the Orient. The first place of 
attraction was a booth surrounded by Japanese parasols and lanterns, 
where beautiful Japanese maidens nodded as they served hot chocolate. 
Borne along in the crowd we passed the candy booths to the spot most 
typical of all, where the tea tables were. Occasionally someone wan- 
dered off to another corner of the room, but if so she rudely awakened 
from her Eastern dream for there fair maids were serving "Dughi's 
Best Ice Cream." 



16 The St. Mary's Muse. 



We all owe a vote of thanks to Miss Katie and her girls for a very 
pleasant evening; and especially will we remember the display of 
Nancy Fairley's energy which had so much to do with the success of the 
occasion. \ 



Prof. Cobb's Lecture at St. Mary's. 



Prof. Collier Cobb, of the University of North Carolina, is a well 
known and favorite lecturer in Raleigh. He appeared on the evening 
of November 11th, for the third time, before a large audience at St. 
Mary's School. His subject was an especially interesting one, "The 
Sand Reefs of the North Carolina Coast," and with his usual happy 
manner of imparting information and with the aid of the beautiful 
stereoptican views, Prof. Cobb did full justice to his subject. 



In Lighter Vein. 



Harriette E. Ruff, Editor. 
J. R. addressing a letter writes carefully in one corner of the envel- 
ope, "IT. F. D." 

J. B. : "Julia, what does IT. F. D. stand for? 
J. R. : "Why, Ural Free Delivery, of course." 

Genevieve C. : "Bland, I want some glasses. Lend me your blue 
ones and I'll wash the blue off." 

"Mother went to the State Ball last night," 

Deaf girl not understanding: "Yes, I am in a bald state. I've 
been tearing my hair out over that old history." 

"What makes you think she is crazy?" 

"I heard her offer to pay in advance for the monthly and the annual 
Muse." 

Ret R. : (at table) : "Say, please give me an empty plate with a 
little potatoes in it." 

M. B. : "Do invalids (infidels) believe in the Bible?" 



The St. Mary's Muse. 17 



A ST. MARY'S VERSION. 

("What care I how fair she be, 
If she be not fair to me.") 

What care I what "kind" she be, 

If she be not kind to me. M. DuB. 

M. Sanborn: "I'm so mad I don't know what to do because Thanks- 
giving comes on Monday this year." Amid shrieks of laughter from 
the girls, A. S. remarks: "Well, I don't see anything funny in 
that." 

At the table: "Please pass the sy-rup." 

Kena L. : "Why do you always say sy-rup ? I am sure s-u-r-r-u-p 
doesn't spell sy-rup. 

Irving Morgan (in the infirmary) : "I wish my "mash" would come 
to see me, but I have not even met her yet." 

Said one of the girls to "Sparrow" Gwynn: "Did you get the vote 
for being the prettiest there ?" 

"No, for they did not take any votes," replied "Sparrow," modestly. 



DEDICATED TO N. HISTORY. 

I sat in my room at midnight, 
The gas was turned down low; 

I had the transom darkened, 
And maps all over the floor. 

A history lay before me 
And crayons by my side; 

"Those boundaries of Maryland, 
They must be here!" I cried. 

And then the Slavery Question 
Came next into my mind; 

"D'Allyon brought them over — 
(I wish they'd stayed behind). 

Well, we won't discuss it, 
For time is flying fast. 
I hope our future lessons 

Will not be like these last. 



18 The St. Mary's Muse. 



I'm getting mighty tired 

Of sitting up so late 
And missing this old History, 

Though going at such a rate. 

I'm growing pale and careworn, 

My head is in a whirl; 
Oh! teacher, do have pity 

On this poor hard-worked girl! B. A. H. R. 



PEGGY'S OPINION. 



"Law missis, you sho do look prutty in dat new frock; you'll out 
shine de whole she-bang: me and Dinah wuz disputin' de other day 
'bout which of our white folks wuz the likeliest, Dinah wuz insistin' 
dat Miss Eose wuz but I sez "Me for Miss Emily." 

Mrs. Crowson's face lighted; her head went up and her shoulders 
back, and saying in a voice meant to be indifferent, "Peggy, I fear you 
are prejudiced," she stepped into the carriage. 

Dinah watched them until they were out of sight, then turning she 
said with a shrug, "I speck I'll git dat blue dress fur dat." 

C. Gant, '08. 

MASHES' MEDLEY. 



To the Muse— With deepest apology. M. duB. 

"Every morn I send thee violets" — 
I mean candy, fruit and such ; — 

"Every night I dream of you, dear," 
For I love you, oh ! so much. 

"In days of old when knights were bold" 
Would you have been my lady fair ? — 

"^or "My love is like a red, red rose," 
Like the rose you have in your hair. 

But "Tell me one thing, tell me truly," 

Will you even stop to sigh, 
When it comes our time for saying 

"Au revoir — but not good-bye" ? 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Subscription, One Year. = ° ne Dollar. 

Single Copies. = = J__ Fifteen Cents. 

A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, 
N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumnae, under the editorial management of the 
Senior Class. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, - 

Correspondence from friends solicited. raleigh, k. c. 



Editorial Board. 

Ruth Foster '06, Editor-in-Chief. Jane Iredell Geeen, '06, Business Manager. 

Francis E. Woolf, '06. Margaret Mackay, '06. Lillian Farmer, '07. 

Literary Department. 

MARY T. LASSITER, '06. GERTRUDE SULLIVAN, '06. 



Editorial. 



This number of The Muse is the first gotten out under the newly 
organized Board. At a recent meeting of the Senior Class, the editors 
were chosen, and their names will be found at the heads of their de- 
partments. The editors again ask for the hearty co-operation of every 
friend of the school in helping to make the paper a success and advanc- 
ing the interests of St. Mary's. 



We are glad to see the athletic spirit aroused so early this year, 
and that so many of the girls are interested in this important part of 
school life. Christine Klingensmith and Margaret Eldridge, ably 
seconded by the club directors, will do their part to make the new 
association a success, but they need the help of every girl in the school. 

We shall greatly miss this year the untiring energy of Jean Carson in 
pushing matters athletic, and the prowess of Virgilia and Kate Glaze- 
brook on the basket-ball field; but thought of them will help develop 
new champions. 

And along with the interest in athletics, we should like to see a 
more living and lively interest in the literary societies. These organi- 
zations are moving along smoothly, but their achievements do not seem 



20 The St. Mary's Muse. 



to measure up entirely to their possibilities. These societies should 
be one of the greatest helps in the student life and should be a genuine 
pleasure and not a burden. There is more needed than regular atten- 
dance, though that is essential. May we not hope to note some im- 
provement at St. Mary's this year along this line. 

Did the students understand how entirely a student paper must be 
a student affair the editors would not need to again ask for contribu- 
tions. The Muse this year has offered three prizes open to the student 
body; one for the best story, a second for the best verses, and a third 
for the best news description submitted for publication in The Muse 
during the current session. These prizes should not be necessary, but 
we hope that they will to some extent encourage the students in making 
some real effort for The Muse. 



Inasmuch as The Muse does not claim to be a literary, but only a 
news-magazine, we do not feel ourselves exactly in the position of our 
sister school-papers which emphasize the literary side. But we desire 
nothing more than the cultivation of friendly relations with our fel- 
low students of other schools and colleges, and to that end would like 
to have exchanges from as many as possible. We wish to extend fra- 
ternal greetings to each of our sister-papers; and the Exchange Edi- 
tor, Miss Annie Sloan, will hereafter try to express our appreciation 
of the various exchanges which come to our table. 

This month we would acknowledge with thanks the University of 
K C. Magazine, The Bed and White, The Wake Forest Student, The 
Guidon, The College Message, The Boys' Industrial School Advance, 
and others. We hope before another month to greet many more friends, 
both old and new. 



The Revival of Athletics. 



Once more an active attempt has been made to establish a healthy 
interest in athletics and outdoor sports at St. Mary's. May it meet 
with a better fate than has befallen most of the spasmodic efforts of the 
past. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 21 



In the announcement for 1903 — '04, it was stated that 'The stu- 
dents and most of the Faculty have formed for themselves a voluntary 
Athletic Association, whose object is to foster the already considerable 
interest in outdoor sports. Tennis, basket-ball and walking clubs 
compose the Association, and are generally very active in the proper 
seasons for these recreations." And this statement was true in the 
days of Miss Boyd, but almost a student generation has passed since 
then. It is on the lines of this announcement that the present associa- 
tion has been formed. 

These are some of the more important points in the simple By-Laws : 
Every student and teacher is eligible to membership. The object of 
the Association is to foster interest in outdoor life, and to that end to 
encourage all desirable forms of out-door games and exercise. There 
will be a Basket-Bali Club, a Tennis Club and a Walking Club, with 
such other clubs as may be needed later. An Athletic Committee of 
seven will manage the affairs of the Association. This committee is 
composed of the President and Secretary-Treasurer of the Association, 
the Directors of the several clubs, and two members from the faculty, — 
the Instructor in Physical Culture and a personal representative of the 
Rector. 

The Association was enthusiastically organized with more than eighty 
members and bids fair to be a success. The first President is Christine 
Klingensmith ; the Secretary-Treasurer, Margaret Eldridge. The 
Clubs have not yet been fully organized, except the Basket-Bali, which 
Lucy Heyvrard will direct. The Athletic Committee is at present com- 
posed of the officers already mentioned, with Emma Barnwell, Jose- 
phine Boylan, Miss Cribbs and Mr. Cruikshank. 



The " Thursday Talks." 



The ''Thursday Talks" — informal addresses before the school on 
Thursday mornings by various educators of Raleigh — though an in- 
novation at this session have proved a delightful success. Each speaker 
has brought "help for the road," and each "talk" has been both enter- 
taining and profitable. 



22 The St. Mary's Muse. 

The speakers for October were Hon. Richard Battle and President 
Winston, of the A. & M. College. 

Mr. Battle gave a most interesting account of the foundation and 
progress of St. Mary's School. As a personal friend of each rector, 
and as a trustee of the school, Mr. Battle is particularly well qualified 
to speak on this subject. 

Dr. Winston, in his happiest manner, talked of "Woman as an 
Educator.''' He paid a beautiful tribute to the character and influence 
of Mrs. Cornelia Philips Spencer, whom he regards as the most intel- 
lectual woman the State has produced, as well as the type of all that 
is fine and noble. 

On Thursday, November 2, Mrs. Iredell spoke on the subject of 
"Aims and Ideals." In earnest, yet well chosen and graceful language, 
Mrs. Iredell impressed upon her audience the need of setting for 
one's self a high ideal, since the elevation of one's character is largely 
determined by the elevation of the ideal placed before it. As ele- 
ments of the ideal, or as aids in attaining it, she emphasized the prac- 
tical importance of persistent effort and of habits of obedience, order 
and attention to little things. 

Mrs. Iredell commanded the attention of the girls not only on account 
of her forcible presentment of her subject, but also on her own account. 
In the minds of the friends of the St. Mary's, no living person is more 
thoroughly identified with the life and development of the school than 
is she. For long connected with St, Mary's as teacher and of late in 
other capacities, especially as president of the Alumnae Association, 
she has clone a great and abiding work for the school and for the many 
young women who have come under the influence of her gentle yet 
strong personality. 

On Thursday, November 9th, Dr. R. H. Lewis gave a most instruc- 
tive and interesting talk. His subject, which was illustrated by charts, 
was the "Human Eye," and he succeeded in impressing his hearers with 
the wonder and beauty of the eye structure and the necessity for taking 
care of such a delicate and valuable organism. 



MATT 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 



President, - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

[Mrs. M T Leak, Durham. 
„ Tm Mrs. 1 M. Pittenger, Raleigh, 

Vice-Presidents, j M)S p p Taoke » R ' al eighf 

LMrs.Kate de R Meares, Wilmington. 
Sec.-Treas., - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 



Editorial. 

Again this has been a "month of marriages" for St. Mary's girls of 
former days. To each of them The Muse extends its best wishes for a 
happy, useful life, and to the fortunate men sincere congratulations. 

The Muse has pleasure this month in presenting to its readers the 
enclosed likeness of Dr. Aldert Smedes, taken from the plate made after 
his well-known portrait. Y\ T e are indebted to Mrs. Iredell for the ap- 
preciative article on the life of the Founder, a topic which should be 
ever interesting to those interested in St. Mary's. 



Thanks are due Miss Adelaide Smith, of Scotland ISTeck, for the list 
of alumnae of the 40's who came from the vicinity of her home. This 
has been the only response to the request for information published 
in the September Muse. Those in charge have not as yet been able 
to actively push this work of collecting information as to the alumnae, 
but will greatly appreciate any contributions bearing on this subject. 



ISTo word yet this session from any of the Guilds. What is the 
matter? What has become of Charlotte, Columbia, Henderson, Fay- 
etteville, Goldsboro and the rest ? May we not have some notes before 
the next issue ? 



The Rector recently attended the session of the 1ST. C. Convocation of 
Raleigh at Wilson, and afterwards visited Eocky Mount. He found 
much interest in St. Mary's at both points and had most pleasant visits. 



24 The St. Mary's Muse. 

The Alumnae will of course be much interested in the proposition to 
place a new altar in the new chancel of the enlarged chapel to the 
memory of the Drs. Aldert and Bennett Smedes. This altar will be 
immediately beneath the memorial window which member of the 
Smedes' family will place as a memorial to Mrs. Sarah Lyell Smedes, 
wife of the Founder. The plan is described elsewhere. 



Who? 



Dear Editors: — Enclosed is my subscription to the Muse, which I wish 
could have been sent before, for, although it is quite a "come down" for a per- 
son to leave St. Mary's only to be "queen of a culinary department," I have 
not yet become so inoculated with mundane affairs that I cannot still be in- 
spired by the spirit of the Muse! In fact, if it would discuss the "Labor Prob- 
lem," so far as to publish articles on "How to Get Cooks," I think I could get it 
a good many subscribers in this neighborhood. Or else, if it would descend so 
much as to discuss recipes for bread, cake, etc., with as much efficiency as it has 
all matters in the past, I am sure that we friends of St. Mary's could enter our 
kitchens with a Muse in one hand and a frying-pan in the other and defy the 
world of servants. Fortunately, though, I believe there are few St. Mary's 
girls that are placed in my predicament. 

Wishing you and the class of nineteen six all the success possible, 1 am, 
Yours sincerely, 

Thursday, October 26th, 1905. 



Alumnae Notes. 



Cards have been received to the following fall weddings : 

Miss Kate Clifton and Mr. Bennett Boddie Perry, October 12th. 
Louisburg, N. 0. 

Miss Margaret Lane Turk and Mr. Gavin M. Dortch, October 31st, 
Christ Church, Raleigh. 

Miss Olive Armstrong and Mr. George Davis Crow, October 31st. 
Wilmington, K. C. 

Miss Louise Greenleaf and Mr. Edward R Outlaw, November 7th. 
Elizabeth City, K 0. 

Miss Mary Thompson Dunn and Mr. Archibald Stuart Hall, Novem- 
ber 9th. Scotland Neck, K C. 

Miss Emma Perrin West and Dr. Thomas Meares Green, Novem- 
ber 16th. St. James' Church, Wilmington. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 25 

Miss Mary Kincey Boylan and Mr. Steadman Thompson, Novem- 
ber 15th. Christ Church, Raleigh. 

Readers of The Muse will recognize old friends, and St. Mary's sends 
her best wishes to them all. 



Olive Morrill was a welcome visitor during the Fair. 

Mrs. Lou Broadnax, of New York, for years a teacher with Dr. 
Aldert Smcdes, paid a visit to St. Mary's in October. 

Miss Kate Carraway of Washington, N. C, who was at St. Mary's 
under Dr. Aldert Smedes, was a recent visitor to the school. 

Mrs. H. V. Horton of Winston-Salem, N. C, nee Miss Cowles of 
Wilkesboro, paid us a visit during Fair week. We are always glad 
to have old St, Mary's girls call. 

Cards have been received recently by friends in Raleigh announcing 
the marriage of the Rev. Henry J. Mikell and Miss Henrietta Camp- 
bell. Mr. Mikell is the rector of the Church of the Holy Communion, 
Charleston, S. C, and a trustee of St. Mary's. 

On the evening of November 4 Mrs. DuBose entertained the Faculty 
at a delightful reception given in honor of her guest, Mrs. Carrie Carr 
Mitchell, of Asheville. Mrs. Mitchell has shown her love for St. Mary's 
by her interest and work in the St. Mary's School Guild in Asheville, 
the members of which Guild have given the chancel in the enlarged 
chapel at St. Mary's. 



IN MEMORIAM. 
Entered into rest three beloved daughters of St, Mary's : 
In September, at her mountain home in Western North Carolina, 
Emily Barnwell Ravenel. 

In October, at her home in Raleigh, Edna Watson, aged 23 years. 
In November, at her home in Raleigh, Mary Wimbish Bailey. 



The Altar in the Chapel. 



In the reconstruction of the St. Mary's Chapel, there were two co- 
ordinate aims : the creation of a building sufficiently spacious for the 
needs of the present and near future, and as beautiful as the funds would 
justify; and the preservation of all that was "near and dear" in the 



26 The St. Mary's Muse. 

old Chapel, all those many parts both of building and furnishings that 
had been hallowed by the long years of worship, and consecrated by the 
love of those who had placed them there, 

And so, though in accordance with the first aim, it was necessary 
to construct an entirely new chancel, the various articles of furniture 
which had been carefully removed from their former places were as 
carefully established again in their proper new places, and when one 
approaches the chancel to-day, it is not as if to come to a new place but 
to an old friend beautified ; for the old altar, the old rail, and the other 
familiar objects are there. 

As the Chapel is the visible heart of St, Mary's, so, of course, the 
altar is the heart of the Chapel, and around it most of the hallowed 
recollections center. That altar must be preserved, and yet, with the 
course of years it has grown too small for our needs. The Guild of the 
District of Asheville gave the new Chancel, and they purpose as time 
goes on to give the furniture still needed, while other memorials have 
been and are being placed wherever needed. But the Altar it seems 
should not be the gift of one or of a few individuals ; not to the memory 
of a few of those who have blessed St. Mary's with their good 
deeds. There seems only one thing appropriate ; that this altar should 
represent the love of the many who have worshipped at the Communion 
in this place; and should be dedicated to the memory of those two to 
whom St. Mary's looks as its master-builders, and who spent so much 
of their consecrated lives ministering there. 

The plan is, therefore, to build in the place of the old altar a new 
and larger one; to make this altar sacred to the memory of Dr. Aldert 
aud Dr. Bennett Smedes, and to raise the requisite fund through the 
love-offerings of those who knew these good men and value them for 
their works, and who love the Chapel for what it has meant and means 
to them. 

The first offering for this purpose was taken at the school at the 
All Saints' Service and amounted to a little more than thirty dollars. 
This is about a tithe of what will be needed. The Muse is glad to 
bring this cause to the attention of those interested in the school and 
feels sure that there are many who will wish to have their part in the 
erection of this memorial, fraught as it is with such special mean- 
ing. 



READ !— M ARK, '.—ACT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The MUSE generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



Established 18 5 S 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 

RALEIGH. XOETH CAROLINA 



HAVE 



WHARTON 

TO MAKE YOUR 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

EEMEMBEE IT PAYS TO GET THE BEST 



SMILING. 

You might as well keep Smilin', 

For there ain't a bit of sense, 
Of fidgetin' an' rilin' 

An' longin' too intense. 
'Cause most things worth the gettin' 

Are sure to find the Place 
Where you're peaceful an' a-Settin' 

With a Smile upon your face. 



WHINING. 

0, what's the use o' whinin' 

When a Smile will cure a Frown? 
An' what's the use o' pinin' 

When it's easy to sit down? 
There ain't a single Trouble 

But will fade before a Smile, 
Or smash just like a Bubble, 

If you'll Sit a litte while. 
— From Shephard's "Happy Days." 



Dobbin & Ferrall 



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KING'S UF-TO-DATE DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN. 
Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets. 

You'll find up-to-date Shoes at 

HUNTER BROS. & BREWER. 



"Who signed Magna Charta ?" thundered the Professor, 
a who signed it, I say V 

Timid Freshman — "Please, sir, 'twarnt me." — Ex. 

"Why do you like pepper and salt clothes ?" 
"They're good for two seasons." 



THE BOYLAN-PEARGE GO. 



Dry Goods, Millinery, 
Tailored Costumes, 
Gloves, Hosiery, 
Handkerchiefs, 
Fancy Goods, 
Underwear, 



Mail orders filled intelligently and promptly. 



FAYETTEVILLE AND SALISBURY STS. 

RALEIGH, ST. C. 



M. ROSENTHAL 
HO. 



G F? O C K R S 



136 EAYETTEVILLE STREET 






Advertisements. 



FOR QUICK COOKING 
nothing exceeds the 

GAS RANGE 

ALWAYS READY. NO DIRT OR ASHES 

FOR LIGHT 

Use the best: THE WELSBACH LIGHT 

STANDARD GAS AND ELECTRIC CO. 

124 Fayetteville St. 



YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 
121 Fayetteville kSTREET. 

J. SCHWARTZ, 

RICHMOND MARKET. 

Meats of All Kinds. 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



The Freshman burned the midnight oil, 
Likewise the midnight taper, 

Thinking on what to write a theme — 
Which at last he wrote on paper. 



CHARLES W. BARRETT— Architect 

Special Work in Fine Colonial Architecture. 

Author of 

"Colonial Southern Homes." 

115% Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 

"TENN MUTUAL LIFE INSURAN CE~COT 
R. B. RANEY, General Agent, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



GRIMES & VASS, 
Fire Insurance acd Investments. 
Raleigh, N. C 

HELLER'S SHOE STORE. 

GYMNASIUM SHOES. 



RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK. 
Capital 815,000 Surplus $25,000. Deposits over 
8600,000. Four per cent interest paid on deposits. 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON, 
COAL, WOOD AND ICE 

122 Fayetteville St Raleigh, N. C. 



E. M. UZZELL & CO., 
PRINTERS AND BINDERS, 

ONLY HIGH GRADE WORK. 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



INSURE AGAINST LOSS BY FIRE. 

Best Companies Represented. 

Bonding Solicited 

THE MECHANICS DIME SAVINGS BANK 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Patronize the 

EXCELSIOR STEAM LAUNDRY, 

FIRST-CLASS LAUNDRY WORK. 

POWELL & POWELL, 
COAL AND WOOD, 

107 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



SAL VA TORE DESIO, 

Manufacturing- Jeweler and Silversmith. 

1012 F. St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

On application will send any article selected. 
To St. Mary's, discount of ten per cent. 

J. S. MacDONALD & CO., Jewelers. 

Diamonds, Watches, Clocks. Silverware, 

Jewelry, Class Rings, Medals and 

Badges to order. 

217 N. Charles St. Baltimore, Md. 

DIAMONDS, WATCHES, SILVERWARE, 
H. SILVERTHORN CO. 
917 Main Street, Lynchburg, Va. 
Manufacturers of College Medals, Class Rings 
and Pins. 



ELLINGTON'S ART STORE, 

Raleigh, N. C. 
Everything in Art. 
Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs. 

For the most satisfactory work, 

Try RIGGSBEE at 
Watson & Co.'s Gallery. PHOTOGRAPHS. 

T. W. BLAKE, 

Rich Jewelry and Silverware. 

Repairing promptly done. 

JOLLY & WYNNE JEWELRY COMPANY, 

Wedding and Holiday presents. 
Fine Watch and Jewelry repairing. 



OPEN UP A SMILE. 

When your heart is dull and sore; 

When the game of life's a bore; 

When the scrabble and the rabble make you "bile"; 

When the friend you thought was true 

Takes to knocker-roasting you, 

Then it's time for you to open up a smile. 

Try the "grin cure," for it works 

Like a charm, and always lurks 

In your heart and in your head, and so beguiles 

Pleasure's sweetness out of pain, 

Ducats to your sack again; 

So then why not open up a face of smiles? 

— From "Happy Days." 



A . E) U G hi I , 

RESTAURANT AND ICE CREAM PARLOR. 

Confections, Foreign and Domestic Fruits. 

CATERER. 

St. Mary's folks know and approve of Dughi. 

Good things always at 

BRETSCH'S BAKERY. 

Buy ROYSTER'S Fine Candies. 



Private Dining and Banquet Halls at 

GIERSCH'S. 216 Fayetteville St. 



CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

At J. L. O'QJJINN & CO. 

Leading Florists of North Carolina. 
Raleigh, N. C. 



H. STEINMETZ, 

FLORIST. 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns and all kinds 

Rale igh.] of Plants. [Phone 113' 



ROBT SIMPSON, Dragg ffiaa 



etc. 



JNO. P. HAYES, Photographer. 

Kodak work of all kinds. 



ANTICEPHALALG1NE cures quickly and 
safely Headache in all its forms. 



Advertisements. 



The National BanK of Raleigh, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Capital $225,000. Surplus and Profits $115,000. 

Chas. H Belvin, President. 

Chas. E. Johnson, Vice-President. 

F. H. Briggs, Cashier 

J. B. Timberlake, Teller and Ass't Cashier. 

Safe Deposit Boxes in Fire and Burglar Proof 
Vault for rent at moderate cost. Absolutely 
6afe place for keeping valuables of all kinds. 

THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

If its furnishing the Home, Office, School or 

Hall, see us. 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 

Cor. Wilmington and Hargett Streets, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

HICKS' DRUG STORE 
Foa Toilet Requisites and Cold Drinks. 



The Citizens National Bank 

RALEIGH, 1ST. C. 
Capital, $ 100,000.00 



Surplus, 
Deposits, 



100,000.00 
1,000,000.00 



Personal Calls and Correspondence Invited 
J. G. Brown, Pres. H. E. Litchford, Cashier 



Our ECCLESIASTICAL ART Department is 

superbly equipped for the prompt and proper 
execution of fiDechurch work suchas Altars, 
Pulpits, Ledums, Prayer Desks, Litany 
Desks, Rood Screens, Fonts, and similar 
furnishings. Write for special church fur- 
niture caialogue. 

HANN-WANGERIN-WEICKHARDT CO., 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 



THE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY, 

Holiday Goods. 



GEO. MARSH & CO., 

Wholesale Groceries, Produce. Fruit, 

RALEIGH. N. C. 



ELLINGTON LUMBER COMPANY, 

All Sorts of Building Supplies, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



mm 



PCOTFEE 



Don't forget to buy your Shoes of 

S. C. POOLE'S Shoe Store. 

PERRY & ROSENTHAL, Trust Bldg. 
Ladies' Fine Shoes. 

Dr. V. E. TURNER, 
Dentist. 



J. R. FERRALL & CO.— Grocers 

Best cf everything in our line. 
22 Fayetteville Street. 

JOHN C. DREWRY. 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE." 



We make your shopping with us "pleasant' 
as well as "profitable." 

A. B. STRONACH COMPANY. 

Outfitters for Ladies, Misses and Children. 

Commencement Dress Materials and Acces- 
sories — Gloves, Fans, Hosiery, Shoes, — receive 
our special attention. 

215 Fayetteville Street. 



STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES. 
Fruits, Vegetables and Country Pro- 
duce. The best of everything and at rock 
bottom prices,. Special prices to schools and 
colleges. D T. JOHNSON & SOSS 

Phon e 78. 163 Ha rgett St. 

MISSUS REESE & COMPANY, 

Millinery. 



Advertisements. 



School Program. 



Nov. l. 

" 2. 

" 4. 

9. 

" 11. 

" 16. 

" 18. 

" 23. 

" 25. 

" 29. 

" 30. 

Dec. 2. 

" 7. 

" 9. 



November-December, 1905. 
All Saints'; Founders' Day; Holy Day. 

Thursday Talk: Mrs. Mary Iredell, on "Aims and Ideals." 
Saturday Evening: St. Monica's Chapter. Japanese Tea. 
Thursday Talk: Dr. R. H. Lewis, on "The Eye." 
Saturday Evening: Prof. Collier Cobb, U. N. C, on "The Sand-Reefs of 

the Carolina Coast." 
Thursday Talk: Mrs. F. L. Stevens, on "Nature Study." 
Saturday Evening: St. Margaret's Chapter. "Maidens All Forlorn." 
Thursday Talk: Hon. J. Y. Joyner, State Superintendent of Education. 
Saturday Evening: St. Anne's Chapter: "The Grasshopper Cantata." 
Wednesday Evening: Epsilon Alpha Pi Reception to its new members. 
Thanksgiving Day: School holiday. 
Saturday Evening: St. Catherine's Chapter. 
Thursday Talk: 
Saturday Evening: St. Etheldreda's Chapter. 



AIR LINE RAILWAY. 

The Shortest and Quickest Route Between North 
and South. 

DOUBLE DAILY SERVICE from New York to Florida points 
Norfolk, Portsmouth to Atlanta and the principal cities of the 
South. Through Pullman services New York to Jacksonville and 
Tampa; also Atlanta, with direct connections for New Orleans 
Nashville, Birmingham, Mem phis, St.Louis, and all pointsin Texas,' 
California and Mexico. 

LOCAL SERVICES. Special attention is called to our conven- 
ient local passenger service throughout the entire system. 

For schedule to any point, rates, time-tables, pamphlets, reser- 
vations or general information, apply to ticket agents or address, 

C. H. GATTIS, T. P. A., C. B. RYAN, G. P. A., 

RALEIGH, N. C. PORTSMOUTH, VA. 

H. A. MORSON, C. P. and T. A. 



*>**■-■ H 



Location Central, for the Carolinas. 



Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 



St . Mar y ' s Schoo l , 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



( for (/iris and young women). 



64th ANNUAL 'SESSION • /BEGAN SEPTEMBER.. 21, 1905. 



SESSION DIVIDED INT0 TWO TERMS; 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 25, "1906. 



St. Mary's 

offers insiruction in these 
Deparivients : 



} 1. THE COLLEGE. 

i % THE MUSIC SCHOOL. 

r 8v THE B USTNESS SCHOOL. 

) jr. THE ART SCHOOL. 

\ o. THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 



In 1905-06 are enrolled 22o students from 13 Dioceses. 

Twenty-live Members in the Faculty. 



•v 



Weil Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. Twenty-eight 
Pianos. New Miller Grand Piano < Just Added. 
Special attention to the Social and Cliristian Side of Education without slight 
ftojhe [scholastic irain^gT:^^^^^^^^^^^-- 1 : '^^^^^^^v^^^w^M 
^jF&.J&talogiie, and other inforinaticn ftddress I 

Rev. MeNeehfMBose, B. '&, B. D. 

118181 RECTOR. 





HB 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

CHRISTMAS NUMBER. 



Vol. X. December, 1905. No. 5. 



Awake, begin, no fear, 
Let joy thy work endow; 
No where so good as here, 
No when so good as now. 



The Haunted House. 



Soon after I bad been ordained to the ministry I was called to an 
Episcopal church in one of the largest cities in New York state. After 
I had been there for about a week I decided to look around for a house, 
so that my mother and sister could come to live with me. For a long 
time I looked in vain, but at last I found a very handsome house in one 
of the prettiest streets in the city; the rent was very low, and as my 
salary was not large I decided to take the house. But one of the men 
in my congregation would not hear of me doing so. "It is haunted/' he 
said; "if any one goes in that house and sleeps in the front room, he 
sees the devil at twelve o'clock; and almost every one has come out a 
raving maniac. You may think that this is all a joke ; but I swear to 
you that if you take that house you will never stay in it a day." 

"This is nonsense, man," I said, laughing heartily; "I do not believe 
in haunted houses, and besides a minister of God is not afraid of the 
devil. This house suits me in every way, and I am going to take it 
and sleep in it to-night, and you will see that I shall be all right in the 
morning." 

As my friend saw that I was determined to have my way he said 
nothing. I took the house, and when night came I went to it, and 
was more than ever pleased with it when I saw the beautiful furnishings. 
I went up to the front room that was said to be haunted and got ready 
for the night. Before getting into bed I noticed that just at the foot 
of the bed was a large, beautiful oil painting that I admired very much. 
I slept very well until I heard the clock striking twelve, when I woke 
up with a start to see the painting at the foot of the bed slide aside, 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



and out into the room stepped the devil that my friend had told me of. 
He came up to the bed, and I could see him very well, as the moon was 
shining full into the room. I had a pistol and knife under my pillow, 
and I was perfectly at ease when I saw him. 

"How dare you come into my house, sir," he said in a gruff voice. 

"Your house?" I replied. "I beg your pardon, my friend, but I 
rented this house this afternoon, so you see I have a perfect right to be 
here, and I may ask, why are you in my room disturbing my sleep in 
this way, and who are you?" 

"Don't you see who I am V he said in a threatening voice. "Leave 
this room this instant, if you don't wish to be put out by force." As 
he said this I jumped out of bed and taking my pistol and knife rushed 
towards him, but he ran to the painting and pushing it aside dashed into 
the opening, while I followed close at his heels. We ran down a long 
hall, at the end of which was a flight of steps which we descended, and 
at last we came to a standstill in a large cellar in the middle of which 
was a long table. Seated around this table were about one hundred 
men whom I saw at a glance were counterfeiting money. I recognized 
among these men many in my congregation. 

"You are found out at last," I said to them; "now I advise you to 
own up and tell me all about this business." 

"We shall do nothing of the kind," said my friend the devil, taking 
off his red garments, and I saw he was one of my vestrymen. "We 
have been here for years, now, counterfeiting money, and you are the 
only one who has found out about it. If you tell on us we shall kill 
you, but if you swear not to tell on us for a year and give us a chance 
to get out of the country, then we will let you go free. Do you swear 
to do that ?" 

As I was young and valued my life I promised to do as they told me, 
and so I went back to my room and finished my night's rest in peace. 
The next morning I told everyone that I had seen the devil but that he 
had not frightened me. I sent for my mother and sister and we lived 
very happily and comfortably in the house, which was never more 
disturbed by the presence of the devil. At the end of the year I told 
about the counterfeiters and several of them were caught, and everyone 
then understood about the haunted house. Trying Morgan. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Better Than Fish. 

A small-sized boy was dangling a fishing-rod carelessly over his 
shoulders and whistling softly to himself as he came down the big 
wood road to the little stream where his destiny took him. He was 
playing truant, of course, but this to him was such a small matter that 
were he here now he would laugh at me for mentioning it. As he sat 
there on the bank holding on to a big oak tree with one hand (for the 
place was risky) and fishing with the other, he noticed a fly-leaf from 
a copy-book floating down the stream; of course he didn't have any 
curiosity— only girls had that, he said to himself, and then went on 
fishing. But the fish wouldn't bite— it seemed to him everything he 
wanted to do he couldn't do. Only this morning in school Fred Harris 
had taken his seat by Maud; humph! how he hated city cousins, any- 
how, always butting in. At recess he could stand it no longer, so he 
had 'gotten up his fishing tackle and started out. And now the fish 
wouldn't bite. He knew it was too cold for them, and then he didn't 
car e_he thought they might bite anyhow. He wouldn't go home— no, 
he would have to cut the wood or pick up chips or get a thrashing for 
running away from school— everybody was down on him anyhow, and 
from the very bottom of his heart he pitied himself. Suddenly he saw 
that the fly-leaf had gotten caught in an old log across the stream, so 
climbing out to the middle of the log he unfastened it and began reading 
it_of course he ought not to have read it, his conscience told him, but 
he always did wrong anyhow. "I guess I was just born that way," he 
said to himself. And this is what he read : 

"Tom walked home with me to-day. I certainly do think he is a 
sweet boy— but I never see him now 'cause Fred is here, and mamma 
says I ought to be a nice little girl and good to my cousin. I wish he 
would go home. Here he comes now, so I will have to hurry up and 
hide you, my dear diary." 

That was all. "Humph!" Tom said to himself, "I didn't want to 
catch any fish anyhow." -*■■ ™ ■ fe - 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



How It All Began. 



She had lived in this small village all of her long six years. He had 
just moved there the day before — and was ten. 

She, standing at her gate in the lawn, had seen him pass on the way 
to his new home, and his mother had smiled at her. Then and there 
she made up her mind that such a handsome boy, with a mother that 
smiled at little stranger-girls, was certainly worth knowing. There- 
fore on this afternoon she persuaded her nurse to put on her "next-best" 
white dress (her best she was saving to wear at her birthday party), and 
went out to swing in the play-ground between the two houses. 

She had not long to wait. He came down the steps whistling a tune 
and peeling a stalk of sugar-cane. Very slowly he opened his gate, 
walked out, seemed undetermined which way to go, decided on the 
play-ground, came on, looking around in an indifferent way, sat down 
on the bench near the little girl's swing, and went on chewing cane. 

Silence reigned for some time. At last — "I know who you are. I 
saw you all come yesterday when I was standing at the gate." 

"I saw you, too," in reply. 

Silence again. Affairs were not progressing fast enough to suit her, 
so again she broke in : 

"I've got a whole lot o' white rabbits ; my muwer gave 'em to me 
last C'ris'mus." 

"Humph! That's nothing. I've got a great big goat what draws 
me aroun' in a wagon. He's coming to-morrow." 

"Goodness !" exclaimed the girl, "I just love to ride in a goat wagon. 
My bruvver uster have a goat, but it butt him down one time and he 
sold it. I'm goin' to have a birf-day party day after to-morrow and 
goin' to have a cake and candies all over the top of it, and I'll ask my 
muwer to let you come if you want to." The boy's face showed his 
delight. 

"And I'll let you ride in my cart." Then after a few minutes — 
"Don't you want some cane ? We brought a whole lot from the place 
where we came from." 

For awhile they sat chewing cane in silence ; he thinking how pretty 
she was, and she thinking what a nice, polite little boy he was. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



They had been sifting there for perhaps an hour talking like old 
friends, when her mother called to her to come and feed the rabbits. 
She jumped up in delight, crying, "Q, come and let's feed the rabbits. 
I'll show 'em to you. They are too cute for anything when they are 
eating." And they walked off together laughing and talking. 

This was the wav that it all besran. 



West Rock. 



A Nocturne. 

I. 

'Tis night; profoundest silence reigns around; 

In halls, on stairs, there's not the faintest sound. 

This is the hour, which to my heart most dear, 

I give to recollections, gay or drear; 

Or else I "burn the midnight oil," to pore 

O'er modern fiction, or ancient classic lore. 

To-night 't is Dante, whose weird allegory 

Shows to my trembling soul the lost in Purgatory, 

Till every nerve is tense and 't would appear 

As if the phantom ghost of some such soul were here, 

When hark! what dismal shriek does rend the house? 

A mouse! A mouse! ! A mouse! ! ! A mouse! ! ! ! A mouse! ! ! ! ! 

II. 

Away with classics: broom and candlestick 

Are snatched from their respective places quick. 

And lights are gleaming, pattering feet resound, 

And fairy-forms appear, with tresses all unbound. 

Acd anxious questioning: "Where is the fire!" 

"Was it a burglar?" "Say, or I'll expire." 

"Was it the A. & M., who us a visit paid, 

And thundered in our ears their classic serenade?" 

Meanwhile the little mouse, tracked to its goal, 

Does vanish, as by magic, in its hole. 

The "Fairies" do likewise, that is to say, 

Tbey to their little beds, creep silently away; 

And soon no trace remains of all this din — 

I double-lock my door, and quiet reigns within. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



hi. 

Now silence is restored, and I would fain 

Resume my reading, but in lighter vein. 

From Petrarch to his lady-love, a sonnet 

Delights and charms me, and I ponder on it. 

How strangely love does sway the heart of man, 

And woman, too, pray solve it if you can. 

Here is a poet, thinker, whom the immortals crave, 

Kneeling, all bathed in tears, on Laura's grave, 

Yet though he thought and wrote so much about her, 

Lived all his life contentedly without her. 

Tis strange, 'tis passing strange . . . but heavens! what yell is that? 

A rat! A rat! ! A rat! ! ! A rat! ! ! ! A rat! ! ! ! ! 

IV. 

And now the scene of but an hour ago 

Would be enacted with the self-same show, 

But that I bid the "Fairies" exit, and would then, 

Alone, unaided, beard the lion in his den, 

This rodent fierce, who thus our rest destroys, 

And puts a tragic end to literary joys. 

However, I act cautiously, not bold, 

For in a rage they'll turn on you, I'm told. 

The night is now far spent, and "Phoebus" gay 

Descends to meet fair "Hebe," harbinger of day. 

The foe in dire retreat, the chase well o'er, 

I hie me to my couch at stroke of four. 

To rest my head, all wearied by the strain, 

Until the "strenuous life" begins again. 

V. 

Envoi. 

Ye shades of Whittington, who in olden times, 
Dids't carry in thy arms a "feline," to the chimes 
Of old St. Paul's Cathedral, and e'en bore 
The tabbies to a distant pagan shore, 
AVnere their deft mousing earned a pound a minute, 
(Though now-a-days there isn't so much in it). 
Send us in mercy, for this plague of mouse and rat, 
A cat! A cat! ! A cat! ! ! A cat! ! ! ! A cat! ! ! ! ! 

. ' Axon. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



SCHOOL NEWS. 

Josephine Boylan, Editor. Annie E. Koonce, Editor. 



Mademoiselle Masch's Entertainment. 

Mile. Masch gave to the faculty and some outside friends, among 
them Bishop and Mrs. Cheshire and Col. and Mrs. Cameron, a delight- 
ful French and German party on Tuesday night, December 5th. 

The guests assembled in the Teacher's Reception Room at eight 
o'clock and spent the hour till nine in pleasant conversation. Then 
began an entertaining program, which Mile. Masch had arranged, and 
in carrying out which she was assisted by members of her classes. 

Emma Barnwell announced the selections. First came Mary Bryan 
in ''La Petite Mendiante." Her rendition of this pathetic little poem 
was very touching' — as were also her ragged garments. 

Serena Bailey was lovely as "Mignon" in the German poem of that 
name. So was Bettie Woolf in the recitation of "Les Adieux de Marie 
Stuart a la France." She was dressed in deepest black with high white 
ruff, in the style of the dress of the time of the Scottish queen. 

Last was a selection from Moliere's ''Les Femmes Savantes." Ger- 
trude Sullivan was Maitre Trissotin, the poet, and the parts of Miles. 
Belise, Philaminte, and Armande, were taken by Harriet Ruff, Annie 
Sloan, and Mary Lassiter respectively. The ladies dressed in gay 
-costumes of the sixteenth century go into raptures over M. Trissotin's 
silly verses, much as our girls of to-day do over a foot-ball game. 

Miss Masch's invitations and replies were in rhyme, and the latter, 
which were varied and witty, were read to the company by Virginia 
Bailey. The judges, Miss McKimmon, Bishop Cheshire and Col. Cam- 
eron, awarded the prize — a quaint Dutch shoe in Delft ware — to Miss 
Pixley, whose rhyme was as follows : 

Sing a song of welcome — 

A party full of rhyme — 
One and twenty teachers arriving just on time. 

When the party's opened 

The rhymes will all be read. 
Isn't that a clever thought to come from Praulein's head? 



g The St. Mary's Muse. 



Thank you for my invite 

And my man friend's too. 
I am mighty sorry that without him we must do. 

When I went to find him 

He wasn't anywhere. 
Wasn't that enough, my friend, to make you tear your hair? 

Yet a throb of gladness 

Wells up in my heart, 
That in spite of such loss, I've enough to part— 

And I'm sure to be there 

In the proper fix — 
Now, isn't this a great rhyme to come from Sister Pix? 

Penance was laid on Mr. Stone and Mr. Cruikshank for conversing 
in English instead of in French or German, during the party. They 
were blindfolded and made to feed each other with cracker crumbs, to 
the great amusement of the company. 

At about ten o'clock delicious refreshments were served, consisting 
of fruit salad, fried oysters, salted almonds, chocolate, olives, nabisco 
wafers and saltines. 

Shortly after the merry party broke up, everyone uniting in thinking 
the gathering one of the most unique and delightful held at St. Mary's 
for several years. ^' 

THE CHAPTER ENTERTAINMENTS. 

"Maidens All Forlorn." 

The second of the Chapter entertainments of the season was given 
on the evening of November 18th, by the girls of St. Margaret's. The 
attraction was the little comedy "Maidens All Forlorn." 

The cast was as f ollows : 

The Aunt Lalla Hamlet. 

( Maud Louise Gadsden. 

_. „ .. ) Ttertha Jennie Morris. 

The Maids < tsertna 

( Elizabeth Virginia Saunders. 

Mrs. Maloney Elnora Williams. 

Dr. Denby Sallie Hay ward Battle. 

Each of the girls took her part well, Lalla Hamlet as the elderly 
aunt being especially good. Maud, Bertha and Elizabeth, the summer 
o-irls at the manless resort, looked and acted their roles; while the plot 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



turns about Dr. Denby, the fondly-looked for man, who on arrival proves 
to be "only a woman." 

The feature of the evening was the between-act song. "A lovely day 
for a walk/' by little Misses Henrietta Schwartz, Ellen Beall, Elizabeth 
Hughes and Florence Stone. 

Miss Cribbs and the girls of her Chapter deserve well-earned congrat- 
ulations on the success of the evening. 

"The Grasshopper Cantata." 
St. Anne's Chapter chose "The Grasshopper Cantata" as their subject 
for the evening of Saturday, November 25th. The array of grass- 
hoppers in livid green and bugs in mournful black, with the bright red 
of "big turkey-gobbler that came up behind" were enough in themselves 
to stir up the greatest merriment, and this was accentuated by the 
rendition of the cantata. 

None of those present are likely to soon forget that 
"The Grasshopper sat on the Sweet Potato vine, 
And the Big Turkey gobbler came up behind— 
And he gobbled him down off the sweet potato vine." 

Perhaps the Big Turkey Gobbler (Mary Lily Fisher) was the star 
of the occasion. The final chorus was especially well rendered. 
Many thanks to Miss Sutton and the girls of her Chapter. 
This was the cast: 

The Herald Grasshopper Frankie Self. 

Grasshoppers Nathalie Dotterer, Leila May Sabiston, Frances 

Lee, Sadiebelle McGwigan, Ella Croft, Eva Rogerson, Irving 
Morgan, 

The Gobbler Marylily Fisher. 

The Reverend Bumblebee Loulie Joyner. 

Bugs Mary Shuford, Annie Wood, Ida Rogerson, George Shaw, 

Kate Blacknall, Mary Gwynn. 
Announcer Lina deRosset. 

"Up to Freddie." 

On Saturday evening, December 9th, St. Ethelreda's Chapter held the 
stage, presenting the little love-comedy, "Up to Freddie." The girls 
looked very sweet and pretty in their attractive costumes, and many of 
the audience pronounced the play the greatest "success of the season." 



10 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Congratulations to the girls and their Chapter directress, Mrs. DuBose. 

The characters were taken thus: 

Grenville Lodge Virginia Miller. 

John Stanhope Julia Winston. 

Freddie Thatcher Christine Klingensmith. 

Leonore Crowningshield Bessie Albright. 

Miss Prince Eul a Gregory. 

Marguerite Burnett Beatrice Cohen. 

Mary Stanhope Emily Carrison. 

Patty Huger Margaret Eldridge. 

Dorothea Chisolm Ruth Batchelder. 

The Epsilon Alpha Pi Reception. 

On the evening of November 29th, the eve of Thanksgiving Day, and 
the close of the first quarter, the Epsilon Alpha Pi Literary Society gave 
a reception to its new members. 

The French Koom was very prettily decorated for the occasion. The 
officers of the Society — Gertrude Sullivan, Jessie Harris, Lucy Hey- 
ward, Lottie Sharpe and Lillian Earmer — received the guests, while 
Bettie Woolf and Nancy Fairley presided at the punch bowl. Emma 
Barnwell and Laura Baker added much to the enjoyment of the evening 
by their piano selections. 

The hour was spent delightfully and informally, dainty refreshments 
being served. 

The guests included the members of the faculty and the officers of the 
Sigma Lambda Society. 

Prof. Connor's "Thursday Talk." 

Mr. R. D. W. Connor, of the State Department of Education, told 
us that he felt himself among old friends when he came up to talk to us 
on the morning of the 7th, and we felt on our part that an old friend 
was with us. Mr. Connor found a number of his Wilmington girls 
with us who think and speak of him still as their teacher, and the asso- 
ciation of his sisters with St. Mary's makes him at least very close to a 
St. Mary's girl. 

Mr. Connor talked on "Some of the Women of North Carolina," 
telling of Mary Slocomb (with the familiar name) and others, whom 
he knows so well, and especially emphasizing the services of Dorothea 
Dix to North Carolina as to the nation. 

We hope to have the pleasure of hearing Mr. Connor again. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 11 



SCHOOL NOTES. 



Kate Blacknall took Nathalie Dotterer home with her over Sunday, 
December 3. 

Marie Koiner, Julia Winston and Olive Robertson spent Thanks- 
giving at home. 

Mamie Slocomb paid us a short visit on her way from the December 
dance at Chapel Hill. 

Forbes Liddell, from Charlotte, spent Thanksgiving at the school 
with her sister, Helen. 

We should like very much to have been with Nora Edmonston at 
her debut in Savannah this fall. 

Myrtle Disoway spent the first few days of December in Hillsboro 
as the guest of Miss Margaret Young. 

We are glad to have Miss Mary Battle with us again. She was 
last here in 1900, and is back refreshing her knowledge of shorthand. 

We all rejoice at Lalla Hamlet's recovery from her recent illness 
and hope that she will be entirely restored to her usual health and able 
to be with us again after Christmas. 

We regret very much that Margaret Mackey's poor health will keep 
her out of school till after the holidays. We hope that she may then 
return to graduate with the honor due her. 

Betsie London gave a house party at her home in Pittsboro at Thanks- 
p-ivinff. Those who went from St. Mary's were Isabel Simmons, Mar- 
guerite Short, Majorie Robertson, Helen Strange and Elise- Emerson. 

Blandina Springs, Annie Louise Hutchinson, Christine Klingen 
smith, Nell Atkinson, Bessie Albright, Virginia Miller and Rubie Nor- 
ms enjoyed the Carolina- Virginia foot-ball game at Norfolk Thanks- 
giving. 

Mrs. Irvine of the Music Faculty, gave a delightful reception to the 
faculty and pupils on the afternoon of Monday, November 13th. She 
was assisted in receiving by Mr. and Mrs. DuBose, Miss Masch and 
Miss Pittenger, while Misses Hull, Pixley, Dowd, Cribbs and DuBose 
served. It was a delightful occasion and thoroughly enjoyed by both 
pupils and teachers. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Subscription, One Year. = = = = One Dollar. 

Single Copies, = = = = = Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, 
N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumnae, under the editorial management of the 
Senior Class. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 

Correspondence from friends solicited. raleigh, n. c. 



Editorial Board. 

Ruth Foster, '06, Editor-in-Chief. Jane Iredell Green, '06, Business Manager. 

Francis E. Woolf, '06. Margaret Mackay, '06. Lillian Farmer, '07. 

Literary Department. 

Mary T. Lassiter, '06. Gertrude Sullivan, '06. 

Editorial. 

The Muse in this number brings to each of its readers the Christmas 
greetings from St. Mary's. No effort lias been made to prepare a 
special "Christmas edition" of the publication. The Christmas joy, 
we hope, is in the hearts of each of us, and in it we greet you — as it 
were, with a silent toast. 



The weeks have sped by with their busy round of duties and pleas- 
ures and the coming of the holidays suddenly arouses us not only to the 
realization that a furlough for well-earned recreation is before us but 
that the mid-year is approaching, and with it the examination period, 
when we hope to be tried and not found wanting. 

It was pleasant to hear from the Rector that the student record for 
the first quarter was quite up to the mark, and that some of us are doing 
even exceptionally well. This record for the quarter shows that we can 
and must make an unusually good record for the year and with the 
New Year let us not only resolve to do but let us begin to do. Let 
not only each one do her best but let each one lend a helping hand to 
the "draggers," a guiding hand to the stragglers. 

How would it do to keep as our motto for the New Year — 
''Look Up, not Doivn; Loolc Forward, not Backward; Stand Together." 



The St. Mary's Muse. 13 



We wish to thank the "College of Charleston Magazine" for the 
suggestive editorial on their magazine club. The idea of the club 
seems to us an excellent one and we shall put it into effect trusting to 
have it prove as much of a success here as our "brothers" of Charleston 
have proved it with them. 

With Our Exchanges. 

Annie Whitmoee Sloan, Editor. 
In the October number of the College of Charleston Magazine we have an ex- 
ceptionally good story. Filled with the ghostly ideas of the medical student the 
story holds our interest throughout and the climax is very effective. 

The Trinity Archive is always well gotten up. The essay on Ruskin, in the 
last number, is well worth reading. The stories are good and so are the poems. 
And we would congratulate the editors on the addition of the Exchange De- 
partment. 

The Converse Concept is one of the best magazines we receive. We await 
with great anticipation the last number of Miss Smith's thesis on the poetry of 
Elizabeth Barrett Browning. "The Review of Sandy" is well written, being 
accurate, condensed and a good story. Perhaps the best thing in the number 
is the little poem called "Memories." It is simple and natural. 

St. Mary's readers will be especially interested in the verses of an old St. 
Mary's girl, Miss Mary deBerniere Graves, now of the University, who con- 
tributes to the November U. N. C. Magazine this little poem: 
******* 
Here's to good old summer, 
When the sky is bright and clear, 
The lazy time, 
The daisy time, 
The happiest of the year! 

Here's to the mountain seeker 
And the dippers in the sea; 

The merry folk, 

The cherry folk, 
The summer's company! 

To the people and the season, 
To the mountain and the sea, 

To singing time, 

In ringing time — 
Oh! summer we drink to thee! 



14 The St. Mary's Muse. 

We acknowledge with thanks the receipt of the Furman Echo, Ran- 
dolph Macon Monthly, Converse Concept, The Palmetto, The Mes- 
senger, and other exchanges ; and hope to comment on more of them 
another month. 

In Lighter Vein. 

Harriett E. Ruff, Editor. 

Gertrude S. : I am cracking nuts instead of jokes. 
Bettie W. : I hope they're not chestnuts. 

Said Mary G. to one of the girls : "What time does the nine o'clock 
bell ring?" (This may appear to be a chestnut, but sometimes it be- 
comes a sad matter for thought, girls.) 

Latin Teacher: "Why are verbs in the third and fourth conjuga- 
tions like an old maid ?" 

Pupil: "Because they have no — bo in the future." 

"I fear you are forgetting me, 

She said in tones polite. 
"I am indeed for getting you ! 

That's why I came to-night." 

— Exchange 

"They tell how fast the arrow sped 
When William shot the apple ; 
But who can calculate the speed 
Of her who's late for Chapel ?" 

— Exchange. 

Annie S.' : Oh — o — o me ! 

Mary B. : Oh, Annie. Is that gumboil on your finger hurting ? 

M. B. : "Ruth got a fine box of candy to-day." 

"Who sent it?" 

M. B. : "Her financier." 

Bessie A. : "I don't like that girl. One day she cuts me up and 
the next she eats me up." 

Mary: "Is Thursday the feast of St. Andrew and all fishermen?" 



The St. Mary's Muse. 15 



First Girl: I declare you have about as much affection as er— 
griddle cake. 

Second Girl : Well, I don't think your comparison very good. The 
griddle cake is stuck on the griddle, you know.— Exchange. 

Teacher: Give me a sentence with "delights" in it. 

Little Girl : When we go to bed we turn out de lights.— Exchange. 

Anna Waugh at the Park looking at some Belgian hares : k 'Oh, are 
those Welsh rabbits?" 

THE LITTLE STORE. 

(It is of course only another instance of the irony of fate that the 
"Little Store" should ungratefully have risen from its ashes before 
this eloquent obituary tribute could be published. Hoping that there 
will be no "next time" we cannot refrain from giving it to our readers 
while the sad catastrophe is at least fresh in our minds.— Editor.) 

Burned, Burned Burned! 

The fate of our "Little Store"; 
Oh would that the flames had excused it, 

In each day we miss it more. 

Oh, grief in all our hearts! 

That our Little Store is gone; 
Oh, the sadness that prevails, 

And the girls! Oh, so forlorn. 

The dreary days drag on — 

We long for Little Store "trash';; 
Oh, for some pickles and potted ham — 

And bananas for my "mash"! 

Burned, Burned, Burned! 

At the break of one cold morn; 
Ah, it's mighty hard to believe the fact, 

But our Little Store is gone. 

(Moved by the pathos of the foregoing the gentle reader should now 
be well prepared to appreciate the beauties of The Meeting.) 

THE MEETING. 

He was waiting in the parlor 

And his heart was beating fast, 
For he knew that in a moment 

He should see his love at last. 



16 The St. Mary's Muse. 



She upstairs before her mirror, 

In a dress of golden sheen, 
Smiled to think how very anxious 

He was waiting for his queen. 

Then with steps so slow and faltering 

Softly she goes down the stair, 
And she pauses at the mirror 

To arrange her glossy hair. 

Then the door is gently opened, 

And she sees her lover's form, 
Feels her own face flushing deeply. 

Like the rosy flush of morn. 

Two strong hands hold hers so closely, 

Two blue eyes above her bend, 
Draw the curtain gently o'er them — 

May their love dream have no end. I. 



ALUMNAE MATTE: 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 



President, - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

(Mrs. M T Leak, Durham. 
Vtoh- Prt^ttifxts J Mrs - L M - Pittenger, Raleigh, 

VICE-PRESIDENTS, < Mrg y p Tucker R, a l e jgh, 

I, Mrs. Kate de R Meares, Wilmington. 
Sec.-Treas., - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 



Alumnae Notes. 



It was a pleasure to have Miss Mary Phillips, of Battleboro, at 
St. Mary's in early December. She was visiting Miss Mary Battle. 

Miss Augusta Jones, of Columbia, was in Raleigh for the Johnson- 
Kimbark wedding, and was the guest of Margaret DuBose at the Rec- 
tory. 

There have been a number of visits from old girls since the last 
Muse appeared, and each one has been a real pleasure. Octavia 
Hughes of jSTewbern, stopped in Raleigh on her way to the Thanksgiving 
game. Anna Clark, '05, and Mary Ella Moore were with us the early 
part of December. Mary Sturgeon of Apex, was with Margaret Du- 
Bose, December 5th and 6th. 

There was a bevy of old St. Mary's girls at the house-party given 
by Mr. Cheshire Webb, at his home in Hillsboro, in the first week in 
December. The party arrived Friday afternoon and that night a din- 
ner and a card party were given in their honor. The guests included 
Misses Eliza Simmons, Mary Thompson, Annie Cheshire, Josephine 
Boylan, of Raleigh; McNeill, of Fayetteville ; Gertrude Winston, of 
Durham ; and Belle Nash, of Tarboro. 

The marriage of Miss Mary Wilson Johnson, to Mr. Frank Masten 
Kimbark, of New York, in Christ Church, on the evening of Wednes- 
day, December 6th, was not only the event of the social season in 
Raleigh but of great interest to St. Mary's both on account of the intimate 
connection of the Johnsons with the school and on account of the part 
St. Mary's girls had in the festivities. Fannie Johnson, last year at 
St. Mary's and now of the New England Conservatory, was her sister's 



18 The St. Mary's Muse. 

best girl. Miss Eleanor Vass, '05, was one of the bridesmaids; and 
Jane Iredell Green and Eland ina Springs served at the reception which 
followed the ceremony. 

Another wedding of interest on December (3th, was that of Miss Annie 
Pratt, 1900, to Dr. John J. Van Xoppen, at St. John's Church, Madi- 
son. Emma West, ( J 97-'98) and Dr. Thomas M. Green were married 
in Wilmington, Xovember 1 6th. 

The nice letters still cheer us from time to time. We thank the 

writers for the following: 

Beaufort. December 6. 

.... When last month came and I did not get my copy of the Muse I just 
missed it terribly, as I always enjoy it, although there are few girls of my 
acquaintance there now. I hope this year will prove successful. 



Bath. R. F. D. No. 1, December 6. 
Dear Editors: — Enclosed is a dollar for my subscription to the Muse. Indeed 
I feel as if I could not do without it, for, isolated as I am from every association 
of St. Mary's, it comes as a refreshing reminder of days gone by. 

Instead of sending the Muse to me, direct it to my little girl, Miriam Gaylord, 
just four months old. 

Sincerely, Mrs. J. F. Tyre. 



READ !-MARK !-ACT ! 



The Editors wish to call the; especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The MUSE generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Musk, and make thos= who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



Established 1858 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 



RALEIGH, 



NORTH CAROLINA 



WHARTON 

TO MAKE YOUR 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

REMEMBER IT PAYS TO GET THE BEST 



A TRIVIAL MATTER. 

The first slice of goose had been cut, and the minister of the Zion 
church looked at it with as keen anticipation as was displayed in the 
faces around him. 

"Dat's as tine a goose as I ever saw, Brudder Williams/' he said to 
his host. "Where did you get such a fine one V 

"Well, now, Mistah Rawley," said the carver of the goose, with 
a sudden access of dignity, "when you preach a special good sermon 
I never axes you where you got it. Seem to me dat's a triv'al matter, 
an v way." 



Dobbin & Ferrall 



Dry Goods 

OF ALL KINDS 




Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
Lains. Drapert.-s. etc. 

LADIES FINE SHOES AND SLIPPERS 



...Send to... 



ALFRED WILLIAMS I GO. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

BOOKS 



OF ALL KINDS 



SELECT LINE OF STATIONERY. 

Eastman's Kodaks ad supplies. 
Office supplies. 



Advertisements. 



Hart-Ward Hardware Company f. c. STBONACfl'S SOI CO 



RALEIGH, N. C. 

Best of everything in Hardware. Satisfaction 

guaranteed or money refunded. All-right 

Cook Stoves, Celebrated Warm Air 

Heaters, the only perfect heater 

made. Write for prices. 

DARNELL & THOMAS, 
Pianos and Organs. 
Sheet music and small goeds. 
Ra LETCH, N. C. 



GROCERS 



216 FAYETTEVILLE STREET 

KING'S UP-TO-DATE DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN 
Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets. 



KING'S GROCERY 
'■The Little Store." 



You'll find up-to-date Shoes at 

HUNTER BROS. & BREWER 



A CHEISTMAS THOUGHT. 
1. 

There's just one week before Christmas, 
And we're glad as we can be, 

For when school duties are over 
We shall hasten home with ejee. 



Everyone's making presents for Christmas 
And the work is filled with love, 

For while we work en out presents, 
We think on the Christ above. 



THE BOYLAN-PEARCE GO 



Dry Goods, Millinery, 
Tailored Costumes, 
Gloves. Hosiery, 
Handkerchiefs, 
Fancy Goods, 
Underwear. 



Mail orders filled intelligently and promptly. 

FAYETTEVILLE AXD SALISBURY STS. 

RALEIGH, X. C. 



.ROSENTHAL 
HO. 

Q JRO C K R S 

136 FAYETTEVILLE STREET 



Advertisements. 



FOR QUICK COOKING 
nothing exceeds the 

GAS RANGE 

ALWAYS READY. NO DIRT OR ASHES 

FOR LIGHT 

Uselhe best: THE WELSBACH LIGHT 

STANDARD GAS AND ELECTRIC CO. 

124 Fayetteville St. 



YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 
121 Fayetteville Street. 



J. SCHWARTZ, 

RICHMOND MARKET 

Meats of All Kinds. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



3. 

We think how He came as a baby, 

A helpless babe so small ; 
We think how He taught and fed us, 

And how He died for us all. 

4. 
So while we are glad at Christmas, 

Let us all have an open heart, 
And share with the poor unfortunates, 

And teach them to do their part. 



-Elise Emerson. 



CHARLES W. BARRETT— Architect 
Special Work in Fine Colonial Architecture. 
Author of 
"Colonial Southern Homes." 
115% Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. % 

"PENNMUT UAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. 

R. B. RANEY, GENERAL AGENT, 

RALEIGH, N. C . 

GRIMES & VASS, 
Fire Insurance and Investments. 

Ralei gh, N. C 

HELLER'S SHOE STORE. 

GYMNASIUM SHOES. 



RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK. 
Capital 815,000 Surplus 825,000. Deposits over 
$600,000. Four percent interest paid on deposits. 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON, 

COAL, WOOD AND ICE 

122 Fayetteville St Raleigh, N. O. 



E. M. UZZELL & CO., 
PRINTERS AND BINDERS, 

ONLY HIGH GRADE WORK. 
RALEIGH, N. C. 

INSURE AGAINST LOSS BY FIRE. 

Best Companies Represented. 

Bonding Solicited 

THE MECHANICS DIME SAVINGS BANK 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Patronize the 

EXCELSIOR STEAM LAUNDRY, 

FIRST-CLASS LAUNDRY WORK. 

POWELL & POWELL, 

COAL AND WOOD, 
107 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



SAL VA TORE DESIO, 

Manufacturing- Jeweler and Silversmith. 

1012 F. St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

On application will send any article selected. 
To St. Mary's, discount of ten per cent. 

J. S. MacDONALD & CO., Jewelers. 

Diamonds, Watches, Clocks, Silverware, 

Jewelry, Class Rings, Medals and 

Badges to order. 

2 17 N. Charles St. Baltimore, Md. 

DIAMONDS, WATCHES, SILVERWARE 

H. SILVERTHORN CO. 

917 Main Street, Lynchburg, Va. 
Manufacturers of College Medals, Class Rings 
and Pins. 



ELLINGTON'S ART STORE, 

Raleigh, N. C. 
Everything in Art. 
Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs. 

For the most satisfactory work, 

Try RIGGSBEE at 
Watson & Co.'s Gallery. PHOTOGRAPHS. 

T. W. BLAKE, 

Rich Jewelry and Silverware. 

Repairing promptly done. 

JOLLY & WYNNE JEWELRY COMPANY, 
Wedding and Holiday presents. 
Fine Watch and Jewelry repairing. 



A DAILY THOUGHT. 

Oh ! it's themes, themes, themes, 
'Tis enough to turn the head ; 
It is themes, themes, themes, 
In my dreams at night in bed. 
Bring all your science, logic, 
And every other thing, 
But themes would be abolished- 
If I were king. 



-Exchange. 



A . D U G H I , 

RESTAURANT AND ICE CREAM PARLOR. 

Confections, Foreign and Domestic Fruits. 

CATERER. 

St. Mary's folks know and approve of Dughi. 

Good things always at 

BRETSCH'S BAKERY. 

Buy ROYSTER'S Fine Candies. 

Private Dining and Banquet Halls at 

GIERSCH'S. 216 Fayetteville St. 



CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

At J. L. O'QDTNN & CO. 

Leading Florists of North Carolina. 
Raleigh, N. C. 

H.ST EINMETZ, 

FLORIST. 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns and all kinds , 

Raleigh.] of Plants. [Phone 113 . 

Drugs and Perfumes, 

Toilet Articles, etc. 



ROBT. SIMPSON, 



JNO. P. HAYES, Photographer. 

Kodak work of all kinds. 

ANTICEPHALALGINE cures quickly and 

safely Headache In all its forms. 



Advertisements 



The National Bank, of Raleigh, 

RALEIGH, ST. C. 

Capital $225,000 Surplus and Profits 5115,000. 

Chas. H Belvin, President. 

Chas. E. Johnson, Vice-President. 

F. H. Briggs, Cashier 

J. B. Timbekiake, Teller and Ass't Cashier. 

Safe Deposit Boxes in Fire and Burglar Proof 
Vault for rent at moderate cost. Absolutely 
■afe place for keeping valuables of all kinds. 

THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

If its furnishing the Home, Office, School or 

Hall, see us. 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 

Cor. Wilmington and Hargett Streets, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

HICKS' DRUG STORE 
For Toilet Requisites and Cold Drinks. 



W. B MANN, 
All Phones. Groceries. 11 E. Hargett St. 



The Citizens National Bank 

RALEIGH, N. C. 
Capital, $ 100,000.00 

Surplus, - - 100,000.00 

Deposits, - 1,000,000.00 

Personal Calls and Correspondence Invited 
J. Q. Brown, Pres. H. E. Litchford, Cashier 

Our ECCLESIASTICAL ART Department is 

superbly equipped for the prompt and proper 
execution of flue church work suchas Altars, 
Pulpits, Ledums, Prayer Desks, Litany 
Desks, Rood Screens, Fonts, and similar 
furnishings. Write for special church fur- 
niture catalogue. 

HANN-WANGERIN-WEICKHARDT CO., 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 



THE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY, 

Holiday Goods. 



GEO. MARSH & CO., 

Wholesale groceries. Produce, Fruit, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



ELLINGTON LUMBER COMPANY, 

All S'Tts of Building Supplies, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



ghink 



m 



COFFEE 



Don't forget to buy your Shoes of 

S. C. POOLE'S Shoe Store. 

PERRY & ROSENTHAL, Trust Bldg. 
Ladies' Fine Shoes. 

Dr. V. E. TURNER, 

Dentist. 



J. R. FERRALL & CO.— Grocers. 

Best cf everything in our line. 
22 Fayetteville Street. 

JOHN C. DREWRY. 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE." 



We make yoar shopping with us "pleasant 
as well as "profitable." 

A. B. STRONACH COMPANY. 

Oulfitters for Ladies, Misses and Children. 
Commencement Dress Materials and Acces- 
sories — Gloves, Fans, Hosiery, Shoes, — receive 
our special attention. 

215 Fayetteville Street. 

STAPLE ANTJ"FaNCY"GR0CER1ES" 
Fruits, Vegetables and Country Pro- 
duce. The best of everything and at rock 
bottom pricei. Special prices to schools and 
colleges. D T. JOHNSON & SONS 

Phone 78. 163 Hargett St 

MISSES REESE &. COMPANY, 

Millinery 



Advertisements. 



School Program. 



December, 1905 — January, 1906. 
Dec. 14. Thursday Talk: 

16. Saturday Evening: St. Catharine's Chapter in "Cranford." 

18. Monday: Regular school duties for Tuesday. 

20. Wednesday: Christmas Holiday begins at one o'clock. 

December 20 to January 3. School Holiday. 

Jan. 3. Wednesday Morning: School duties resumed with Chapel Service. 
4. Thursday Talk: 
" 6. Saturday Evening: 

January 18-24, 1905. Academic and Music Examinations. 



January Muse due January 15th. 



AIR LINE RAILWAY. 

The Shortest and Quickest Route Between North 
and South. 

w V9y B ^ DAILY SERVICE from New York to Florida points, 
? or f2 lk 'm? ortsi ?°^ th , to Atl anta and the principal cities of the 
South. Through Pullman services New York to Jacksonville and 
Tampa; also Atlanta, with direct connections for New Orleans 

Nashville, Birmingham, Mem phis, St. Louis, and all points in Texas' 
California and Mexico. 

LOCAL SERVICES. Special attention is called to our conven- 
ient local passenger service throughout the entire system 

For schedule to any point, rates, time-tables, pamphlets reser- 
vations or general information, apply to ticket agents or address, 

C. H. GATTIS, T. P. A., C. B. RYAN, G. P. A., 

RALEIGH, N. C. PORTSMOUTH, VA. 

H. A. MORSON, C. P. and T. A. 



Location Cento 



Cweoli 



nets. 



Climate Healthy and Salubrious, 



St. Ma Ft¥ ' s S c h o o l , 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



( for girls and gounff worm n ). 



G4th ANNUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER 21. 1.905. 



v I sEASTEE TEEM BEGINS JANUARY BGHj 






\2, IfflB iJJBSTC SCHOOL 

T i- HHB HMilBliBBIBB 






Well Furnished, 





vaiefd- Me»^ lFitiettiy--eight 



M ' ^^p&^at attention to thei 

to the scholastic training, 

&a?C)BLt(tlogite and other informal 



Sideof Education without slight 



Rn\ MeNcely BuBosc, & ■ 5; Z>. 



RECTOR, 



■ 



3am*ar& 1906 




6 



M 



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M 






The St. Mary's Muse. 

NEW YEAR'S NUMBER. 



Vol. X. January, 1906. No. 6, 



Life's Compass. 



Four things a man must learn to do 
If he would make his record true: 
To think without confusion clearly; 
To love his fellow-man sincerely; 
To act from honest motives purely; 
To trust in God and Heaven securely. 



— Henry VanDyke. 



How Mrs. Pond Chaperoned. 



Down at the hall the girls were decorating for their bal poudre. 
Mrs. Pond, who positively refused to grow old, was there too, offering 
suggestions and doing things which always had to be undone, for in 
spite of her refusal to acknowledge it, she had been young so long ago 
that her ideas of decorating were out of keeping with the present man- 
ner of a branch here and a garland there, regardless of order. Mrs. 
Pond approved of circles of pasteboard covered with cedar and holly 
hung in some regular and seemly order around the walls, and it was 
Louise Hall who skillfully prevented such a calamity by giving as an 
excuse lack of time. Of course there must be a man to superintend the 
business affairs, and as Louise Hall had gotten up the dance Hal Worth 
offered his services, for he was Louise's suitor. 

We have then Mrs. Pond acting as chaperone to twelve girls and one 
man — seemingly an easy job, but not so when the man is good-looking 
and in love with the prettiest of the girls. But chaperones can be of 
such a help when they approve of what is on hand, and just so was 
Mrs. Pond on this occasion. Seeing the longing looks of the lovers 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



she sent Louise for some string, knowing that Hal would follow. He 
did, and they were gone so long that when they returned the string 
was no longer needed. The work was finished and Mrs. Pond was 
amusing the crowd by asking conundrums. When Louise entered she 
asked absent-mindedly, "Louise, when a young man proposes, what 
book does it suggest?" 

What was her surprise when instead of hearing the answer to her 
riddle — "The Crisis" — she heard Louise blushingly stammer, "Oh, Mrs. 
Pond, how did you know ?" 

"Know what Louise ? What's the matter ? Can't you answer it V 
"Why, you asked me what book was suggested when Hal proposed." 
Mrs. Pond was about to contradict this when a chorus of voices cried: 
"A guilty conscience. Hal has proposed ! Confess, confess I" 

Louise, caught so well, could do nothing to avoid teasing but announce 
the engagement, and so she did, and then she and Hal together thanked 
Mrs. Pond for her delicate help. Lottie Sharpe. 



In the Garden. 



She's the loveliest little creature, 
So dainty and so sweet; 

One of those priceless little angels 
That you scarcely ever meet. 

So I thought one morning, 

As she came tripping up to me, 

Laughing a merry little laugh — 
Just as cute as she could be! 

I was in a garden of love, 
She the little forget-me-not; 

I gathered it and pressed it — 
But the rest I've quite forgot. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



STORIETTES. 



AN INCIDENT OF THE CIVIL WAR 

One bright sunshiny day in the summer of 1864, the little town of 
Newton, North Carolina, was the scene of great excitement. All the 
men able to fight had gone to join the Confederate army, leaving behind 
the old men, women, and children. These knew that the Federal gen- 
eral had stored seven or eight barrels of whiskey in the freight depot, 
and fearing that the soldiers would discover the fact, steal the liquor 
and get drunk, the ladies at once met together to decide what must be 
done. 

"What shall we do ?" they cried. "We shall be at the mercy of 
drunken soldiers, for we have no protection." At last they decided to 
go to the depot, break open the barrels and let the whiskey run out. 

So about thirty women, armed with axes, came to the depot and 
broke down the door. Then they rolled the barrels out and broke them 
open, so that the whiskey ran out in the road. Having done this, they 
burned the barrels. 

Now, Major Campbell, a veteran of the Mexican War, had a fine 
thoroughbred horse, named "Black Prince," a great favorite of everyone. 
As the ladies were going home, imagine their surprise and horror to see 
Black Prince go staggering down the street. He had gotten loose and, 
seeing the whiskey, thought he would take a drink, but he got a little 
too much. 

The next day the soldiers came and at once began searching for the 
whiskey, but the hot sun had dried it all up. When they failed to find 
it, they were so angry that they pulled the depot down, but none of 
them from that day to this knows where it went to. 

This is a true story, for my grandmother was one of the brave women 
who saved the town from the possible ravages of drunken soldiers. 

Mary Shuford. 



A SHIP LOST AT SEA. 

Many years ago, on a beautiful September morning, a ship sailed out 
of the harbor of New York, bound for the East Indies. She was 
loaded with the products of American industry and was expected to 



4 The St. Mary's Muse. 



bring back a cargo of coffee and spices. The captain was a young man 
full of energy and ambition, the only son of a widowed mother. On 
board were two passengers, a boy and a girl, the children of a mission- 
ary in India. They had been at school in America, but had been sum- 
moned to their distant home by the news that their mother grieved so 
over the separation from her children that her life was in danger. 

The days sped on and lengthened into weeks, but the good ship did 
not reach her port. Months passed, but no tidings of the missing vessel 
came to either shore. On one side, an old woman, watching for a sail 
that never came, cried to the sea, ''Bring back my dear ones." On the 
other side, a dying mother moaned, "Give back my dear ones" ; but the 
cruel sea gave no sign. Years have rolled away, and both mothers have 
gone where there is "no more sea," but still the tossing waves hide their 
well-kept secret. Leila May Sabiston. 

MY INTEREST IE" SIGN-BOARDS. 

There is a department in the Ladies' Home Journal devoted to arti- 
cles on beautifying America, and in these a great deal has been said 
lately about removing unsightly sign-boards from along our country 
roads. Unbeautiful as the sign-boards are, I always find them very in- 
teresting. 

The "Uneeda Biscuit" boy, who always wears oil-skins and carries a 
box of Uneeda Biscuit, conspicuously displayed in an "Tn-er-seai" pack- 
age, is a special friend of mine, and I am always glad to see him when ! 
I am taking a country walk or drive. 

The "Gold Dust Twins" are also a most interesting pair, and the 
amount of work accomplished by them is really wonderful, though 
lately they have been taking some recreation and touring the country in 
an automobile made of the household dishes which they have scrubbed so 
clean and bright. 

It is also interesting to know that "at Clark's, Gentlemen's Furnish- 
ings," music is flying in the air, for "two bands are given with every 
hat" ; and, "If you are tired come to Clark's, where a seat is furnished 
with every pair of trousers." 

When riding through the country I always like to read the sign-boards 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



as I pass when, unless I am familiar enough with one to know what it 
says before I have come to the next, I usually find out something like 
this: "Go to the American Hardware Co. for" . . . "the best $3.00 
shoe made." . . . "Good for coughs, colds, and all throat affections." 
And so I say again, when Women's Clubs have rid the country of 
sign-boards, though our country drives will be more beautiful, I for one 
shall miss the sign-boards. Helen Llddell. 



SCHOOL NOTES. 



Miss Cribbs went home with Emily Clarkson to Eastover, S. C, and 
Myrtle Powell visited Martha Ferebee during the holidays. 

The party from St. Mary's that attended the recital of Dean South- 
wick of the Emerson School of Oratory, Boston, at the Baptist Univer- 
sity on the 10th was delighted. Mr. Southwick read "Julius Csesar," 
and the reading was a real treat. 

It is pleasant to welcome Agnes Carter of Asheville, Roberta Taylor 
of Kinston, and Moressa Pool of Elizabeth City, to a place with us for 
the new term, and we shall be glad to see the other new girls who we 
hear are expected. Lalla Hamlet's return, restored to her usual health, 
is also a cause for rejoicing. 

There were only seven girls left at St. Mary's during the holidays, 
but, chaperoned by Mr. and Mrs. Sanborn, they had a very good time. 
Most of the girls were at their homes, and in addition to the pleasure 
of being with the "home-folks," had a merry time with numerous 
dances, card-parties and other forms of amusement. 

Mrs. DuBose's sister, Mrs. King, and her daughter, Miss Daisy, of 
Sewanee, who are always welcome visitors at St. Mary's, have been 
spending a part of the university vacation at the Rectory. They were 
with Mrs. DuBose during the holidays, when Mr. DuBose enjoyed a 
visit which included much good fishing at the winter home of Captain 
Patton of Asheville in Dunedin, Florida. 

The "Thursday Talk" of our old friend, Mr. Hodgson, on the morn- 
ing of the 11th made a decided "hit." The girls of St. Mary's have 
been enjoying Mr. Hodgson's music now for many a year, and never 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



grow tired of it ; but this was his first serious talk to us on the subject, 
and his informal explanations and demonstrations of the art of music- 
writing as well as music-interpreting, was full of possibilities for us. 
And the wondrous way in which our old friend — a Go tell Aunt Nancy" 
— blossomed out under his skilled fingers into waltz, two-step, march, 
dirge and what-not, will cause some of us to long think of Mr. Hodgson 
whenever we hear the tune in any of its variations. 



In Lighter Vein. 



Harriett E. Ruff, Editor. 
V. S. — "Helen, did you ever study French ?" 
H. A. — "Oh, yes ; I have read Cicero and Virgil both." 



G. C. — "I'm so stupid, everything I study goes into one ear and out 
of the other." 

P. S. — "Isn't there anything in the middle to stop it ?" 



A. B. — "Mary, have you joined the E. A. P. Society yet?" 
M. B. — "I've been taken in, but I haven't been initiated yet." 



EXAMINATIONS (with apologies). 

Wake, wake, wake 

From thy dreams at stroke of three, 
For soon will my pen have to sputter 

Knowledge that's fled from me. 

Oh well for the mouse in the wall 
That he squeaks with his sister at play, 

Oh well for the little gray thing 
That he feels not my terror to-day. 

And the precious minutes still haste 
To the break of this terrible morn. 

Oh, for the touch of Aladin's lamp 
To bring back the knowledge that's gone. 

Shake, shake, shake 

In your boots, oh poor little me, 
For the salient facts of the lessons now past 

Will never come back, I see. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Subscription. One Year. = °* e Dollar. 

Single Copies. ■ F ifteen Cents. 

A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, 
N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumna, under the editorial management of the 
Senior Class. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to^ ^ MARY , g MUgE) 

Correspondence from friends solicited. raleigh, h. c. 



Editorial Board. 

Ruth Foster, '06, Editor-in-Chief. Jane Ieedell Gkeen, '06, Business Manager. 

Francis E. Woolf, '06. Margaret Mackay, '06. Lillian Farmer, '07. 

Literary Department. 

J Gertrude Sullivan, '06. 



Mary T. Lassiter, '06. 



Editorial. 

The architects for the new Auditorium building have been selected. 
It will be even nicer to have the building than to see the plans. 

Everyone had a good time Christmas— that goes without saying. We 
hope that everyone has been enjoying the early weeks of 1906. Hail 
to the new year ! 

The December Muse appeared on the eve of the Christinas holiday— 
our greatest joy; this number goes to the printer on the eve of the 
Advent examinations, second only to Christmas in our thoughts. May 
our recollections of the examination week, girls, be as pleasant as our 
remembrances of the holiday days. 

Mr. Sanborn will furnish us and all the music-lovers of Kaleigh and 
the neighboring towns a great treat in the Bispham concert on February 
12th. A critic says : "Mr. Bispham's fame as a baritone — he is the 
greatest American male singer of recent years— is too well known to 
make it necessary to dwell at length upon his achievements. In opera, 
in oratorio, and in concert, he has appeared with success such as comes 
to few, and his reputation abroad, where his name is a popular one, is 
as great as in this country of his birth." On his present tour Mr. 
Bispham is repeating his unique series of "Great Song Cycles," which 



8 The St. Mary's Muse. 

has won universal favor. The concert will be given in the Academy of 
Music under the auspices of St. Mary's and will doubtless be the musical 
event of the season in Raleigh. 



With Our Exchanges. 

Annie Whitmoee Sloan, Editor. 

The Inlooh comes to us in a pretty new cover — the paper on which it 
is printed is also above that of the average monthly. There are several 
short stories, of which "Nibs, the Peacemaker," is the best; two or 
three sketches, and not even a single poem. 

The Clemson College Chronicle is unusually well gotten up this month. 
The etching after Gibson makes an attractive frontispiece and the 
photographs throughout the whole add to the magazine. The essay on 
"The Spirit of Chivalry" is well worth reading; the writer seems to 
know his subject thoroughly, and may teach the most of us a good deal 
we don't know about chivalry. "Is War a Necessity" is also a good 
article. Of the many short stories "The Little Waif's Xmas" and "The 
Best in Him" are perhaps the best. 

But The Chronicle j like The Inlooh, is entirely devoid of poems. 
Poetry does not seem to be easy to get from most of our Southern 
colleges, and I suppose the editors of The Chronicle have the same 
trouble as the others. 

The editors of the Red and White promised us a good Xmas number, 
and in looking over the magazine we feel that we were not disappointed. 
The amount of solid matter and fiction is about evenly divided. "None 
too Great to Kneel" is about the best short story. The one value of 
the story is that it is original. "The Holly Song," although a selection, 
is good and very appropriate. The other two poems, "The Winter 
Fantasy" and "Christmas Bells," are also good productions, and in 
keeping with the joyful Xmas time. The magazine as a whole is one of 
the best that has come to our table, and we would congratulate the 
editors for it. 

These are only a few of the many exchanges that have come to us 
this month, but limited space forbids us saying more. As a whole all 
the exchanges are better than usual this month. Now that you have 
them up, editors, don't let your standards go down. 



ALUMNAE MATTERS 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 



President, - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

f Mrs. M. T. Leak, Durham. 
„ mo J Mrs. 1. M. Pittenger, Raleigh, 
Vice-Presidents, j Mrs F R Tucker, Raleigh, 

[ Mrs.Kate de R. Meares, Wilmington. 
Sec-Tee as., - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 



Alumnae Notes. 



And still no communications from the Alumnae. 

Mrs. Bancker Smecles (Miss Lily Hicks), of New York, has been 
visiting her sister, Mrs. John Calvert, in town. 

Miss Sada Hanckel, of Charleston, spent the holidays with Miss 
Dowd in West Raleigh, and at the same time Miss Emily McVea, 
formerly Lady Principal here, now of the University of Cincinnati, 
was visiting Mrs. Dr. Knox. 

We extend our sympathy to Miss Mary Sturgeon and her family at the 
death of her mother, Mrs. Annie Young Sturgeon, of Apex, on Decem- 
ber 30, and to Rev. Edward Wooten at the death of his daughter, Mary 
M. Wooten, formerly of St. Mary's. 

Little Master George Roberts Payne came as a Christmas gift to the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Payne, of New York. Mrs. Payne's 
(Miss Lillian Roberts, of New Bern) many friends rejoice with her at 
the arrival of this grandson of St. Mary's. 

"Miss Katie" spent Christmas with another "grandson". of the school 
in the person of Master "Billy" Bacon, youthful son of Mrs. M. R. 
Bacon, of Albany, Ga. (Kate Hawley, of Eayetteville) . Miss Katie 
joined her sister, Mrs. Hawley, in Eayetteville, and they went together 
to Albany. 

Her friends were very glad to see Miss Alice Jones, now head of the 
Latin Department at Winthrop College, on the 13th. She was on her 
way to her home in Goldsboro for a very brief vacation. She reports 
that both Sadie Jenkins and Susie Battle are doing nicely as instructors 



10 The St. Mary's Muse. 



in piano at Winthrop. Through her we would send greeting to them 
and to Miss Schutt. 

The Muse extends congraulations to the contracting parties in the 
following January marriages, in each of which the bride is a well-known 
old St. Mary's girl : 

On January 10th ? at her home in Ealeigh, Tempe Boddie Hill to Mr. 
James Edward Carraway, of Waynesville, 1ST. C. 

On January 10th, at the Church of the Good Shepherd, Ealeigh, 
Maude Middleton Latta to Mr. Archibald Hunter Arrington, of Ea- 
leigh. 

On January 9, at the bride's home in Williamston, N. C, Eliza 
Lamb to Dr. C. H. C. Mills, of Charlotte. 



Clergy Stalls. 



The St. Mary's Guild of the District of Asheville has not only given 
the $800.00 with which the Chancel in the enlarged Chapel was built, 
but has recently authorized the Eector to order quartered oak Clergy 
Stalls for the same, at a cost of $140.00. 

All praise to the daughters of Asheville, and may the other Guilds 
follow their good example, and send in gifts either as Guilds or as 
individuals for the new Altar, for which we have in hand about a hun- 
dred dollars given by the school. 

If these gifts come in as liberally and promptly as we hope they will, 
the order will be given and the Altar put in place for the Easter services. 

The Eector will be glad to hear from all who are interested. 



Authorized Notice. 



In the November number of the Muse the attention of the friends 
and alumnae of St. Mary's was called to the determination to put a 
suitable Altar and Eeredos in the enlarged Chapel, not as the gift of 
one, or a few individuals, but as representing the love of many who 
have received the Holy Communion in that place, and to dedicate the 
Altar to the memory of those two who have made St. Mary's what it is, 



The St. Mary's Muse. 11 



and who for so many years ministered so faithfully at her Altar, — the 
Drs. Aldert and Bennett Smedes. 

For this purpose an offering was taken in the Chapel on All Saints' 
Day, and since then the Junior Chapters of the school have added 
$84.75. An alumnae has sent $5.00, and we have so many promises and 
expectations from our friends that in ordering the Clergy Stalls, re- 
cently given by the Asheville Guild, I have asked the builders — The 
Hann-Wangerin-Weickhardt Co. of Milwaukee — to send me the cut of 
Altar and Keredos for publication in next month's Muse, and I have 
told them that we would try to have the Altar by Easter. The cost of 
Altar and Keredos, on cars at Milwaukee, will be $300, and we want all 
who wish to take part in this memorial to send their gifts at once, so 
that the order may be placed as soon as possible. 

Do not be afraid to send much, nor ashamed to send little, but let all 
who love St. Mary's— the Chapel— and the Drs. Smedes, have some 
part, and if any money is left over, it shall go to the next memorial— 
a Bishop's Chair — to Bishop Atkinson. 

Hoping to have many responses, and promising a further report in 

the next issue. 

Sincerely McISTeely DuBose. 

Scholarships. 



To those interested in the question of scholarships at St. Mary's, the 
Eector would announce that the only competitive scholarship which 
will be vacant for the next school year, beginning September, 1906, is 
the Murchison Scholarship, applicants for which must be residents 
of the Diocese of East Carolina. Notices with full information re- 
garding this scholarship will be sent to the East Carolina clergy and 
any others interested about the last of this month. 

Any other scholarships which may be vacant will be in the gift of the 
Bishop of the Diocese to which the scholarship belongs. 



READ !— MARK !— ACT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



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To the Father's love ; 
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SCHOOL PROGRAM. 



Jan. 11. 

" 18. 

" 19. 

" 19. 

" 24. 

" 25. 

" 25. 

" 27. 

Feb. 1. 

" 12. 



January-February, 1906. 
Thursday Talk: Mr. H. E. Hodgson, on "Tune Making" 
Thursday Talk: Supt. E. P. Moses, on "The Education of a Girl" 
Term Examinations begin. 

Friday Afternoon: Exercises commemorative of Lee's Birthday 
Term Examinations end. 
Easter Term begins. 
Thursday Talk: 

Saturday Evening: St. Etheldreda's Chapter repeats "Up to Freddie 

Thursday Talk: 

Monday Night: David Bispham, Baritone. 



CHARLES W. BARRETT-Architect 
Special Work in Fine Colonial Architecture. 
Author of 
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115% Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 

"PENN MUTQALTXF^TNSljRANCECO - 

R. B. RANEY, General Agent. 

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GRIMES & VASS; 
Fire Insurance arid Investments. 
Raleigh, N. C 



HELLER'S SHOE STORE. 
GYMNASIUM SHOES. 



RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK" 

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Advertisements. 



SALVATORE DESIO, 

Manufacturing Jeweler and Silversmith. 

1012 F. St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

On application will send any article selected. 
To St. Mary's, discount of ten per cent. 



J S. MacDONALD & CO., Jewelers. 

Diamonds, Watches, Clocks, Silverware, 

Jewelry, Class Rings, Medals and 

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217 N. Charles St. Baltimore, Md. 

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Manufacturers of College Medals, Class Rings 
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A . D U G H I , 

RESTAURANT AND ICE CREAM PARLOR. 

Confections, Foreign and Domestic Fruits. 

CATERER. 

St. Mary's folks know and approve of Dughi. 



Good things always at RETgcH , s BAKERY . 



Buy ROYSTER'S Fine Candies. 

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J. B. Timberlakb, Teller and Ass't Cashier. 

Safe Deposit Boxes in FireaDd Burglar Proof 
Vault for rent at moderate cost. Absolutely 
safe place for keeping valuables of all kinds. 



THOS. H. BRIGGS &SONS, Raleigh, N. C— 

Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We eudeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

If its furnishing the Home, Office, School or 

Hall, see us. 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 

Cor. Wilmington and Hargett Streets, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

HICKS' DRUG STORE 
Foe Toilet Requisites and Cold Drinks. 



W. B. MANN, 
All Phones. Groceries. 11 E. Hargett St. 



The Citizens National Bank 

RALEIGH, N. C. 
Capital, % 100,000.00 



Surplus, 
Deposits, 



100,000.00 

1,000,000.00 



Personal Calls and Correspondence Invited 
J. G. Bbown, Pres. H. E. Litchford, Cashier 

Our ECCLESIASTICAL ART Department is 
superbly equipped for the prompt and proper 
execution of fine church work such as Altars, 
Pulpit*, Lecturns, Praver Desks, Litany 
Desks, Rood Screens, Fonts, and similar 
furnishings. Write far special church fur- 
niture catalogue. 

HANN-WANGERIN-WEICKHARDT CO., 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 



THE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY, 

Holiday Goods. 



GEO. MARSH & CO., 
Wholesale Cieoceries, Produce, Fruit, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

ELLINGTON" LUMBER COMPANY, 

All Sorts of Building Supplies, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Mwk 



mi 






Don't forget to buy your Shoes of 

S. C. POOLE'S Shoe Store. 

PERRY & ROSENTHAL, Trust Bldg. 
Ladies' Fine Shoes. 

Dr. V. E. TURNER, 
Dentist. 



J. R. FERRALL & CO.— Grocers" 

Best of everything in our line. 
22 Fayetteville Street. 

JOHN C. DREWRY. 
" MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE." 



We make your shopping with us "pleasant 
as well as "profitable." 

A. B. STRONACH COMPANY. 

Outfitters for Ladies, Misses and Children. 
Commencement Dress Materials and Acces- 
sories — Gloves, FaDS, Hosiery, Snoes, — receive 
our special attention. 

215 Fayetteville Street. 

STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES. 
Fruits, Vegetables and Country Pro- 
duce. The best of ever3'thing and at rock 
bottom prices. Special pricps to schools and 
colleges. D. T. JOHNSON & SONS 

Phone 78. 163 Ha rgett St. 

MISSES REESE & COMPANY, 

Millinery 



nati on Central for the Carolinas. 

Cl imate Healthy and Salubrious. 

St. Mary's School, 

RALJE1GH, N. C. 



(for girls and young women). 



m 



ANNUAL SESSION 7 BEGAN SEPTEMBER 21, 1905. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 25, 1906. 



St.; Mary's 

fers instruction in these 
Departments :_ 



1. THE COLLEGE. 

2. THE MVSLC SCHOOL. 

3. THE BUSLNESS SCHOOL. 
I THE ART SCHOOL. 

■5\ THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL 



)(> are enrolled 2c25 students from 13 Dioceses. 

Twentv-five Members in the Faculty. 



II Furnished, Progressive Music Department Much Equipment New. Twenty-eight 
Pianos, Hew Miller Grand Piano Just Added. 
Special attention to the Social and Vhristian^Side of Education without sUght 
the scholastic training. 

Catalogue and other information address ' : ;. 

Rev. McNeely HuBose, B. S., B. L). 

■ IH ^H RECTOR. 



f ebruWJr Ifcpfr 



*Qr 






H 




■ 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

VALENTINE NUMBER. 



Vol. X. February, 1906. No. 7. 



Apollo has peeped through the shutter, 

And awaken'd the witty and fair; 
The boarding-school belle's in a flutter, 

The two-penny post's in despair; 
The breath of the morning is flinging 

A magic on blossom and spray, 
And cockneys and sparrows are singing 

In chorus on Valentine's day. 



— Selected. 



Robert E. Lee, 1807=1870. 



After centuries have rolled by— when his contemporaries shall have 
passed into obscurity, the name of Lee, like that of Washington, will still be 
luminous with a lustre of glory, and his fame will be perpetuated as the 
noblest, the knightliest, and the most illustrious patriot who ever drew sword 
in his country's cause.— From Capt. Ashe's Oration on Gen. Lee before the 
Johnson Pettigrevo Chapter U. D. C, Raleigh, January 20, 190k 

Happiness, heartiness, genuine feeling characterized the Lee's Birth- 
day celebration at St. Mary's. The 19th of January was this year the 
very eve of the examination week with all that that means to the average 
student, but the few hours of holiday were doubly welcome on that 
account, and who knows but that the inspiration caught in the thought 
of Lee may have been the potent factor in carrying so many so happily 
through the examination days. Certainly the few minutes of meeting 
together on the 19th in united, loving thought of the greatest of the 
sons of the South was one of those refreshing moments that linger long 
in the memory and do much to help us as we move on. 

Our Lee exercises were very simple. At the morning Chapel service, 
as usual, the Rector called our attention briefly to the day and its signifi- 
cance, and offered the thanksgiving for the example of the saints, at 
once heroes and servants, who have gone before. In the afternoon when 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



the half-day of work was done and the holiday begun, at 2 o'clock we 
gathered in the parlor, still looking much as it did in the days when 
Mildred Lee was one of those who enjoyed it as we do now, and with 
General Lee's face looking down upon us from the wall spent a few 
moments in doing special honor to his memory. 

After the hearty singing of the school-song, "Alma Mater," Miss 
Cribbs read Father Kyan's ''Sword of Lee" and we were back in the 
days of our fathers. Laura Baker then read the following sketch of 
Lee, prepared by Fannie MeRee: 



ROBERT EDWARD LEE. 



Who does not honor and reverence this greatest among the names inscribed 
on the Honor Roll of the South? Even his enemies could not but admire Rob- 
ert E. Lee, and acknowledge him a foe worthy of their steel. How many fathers 
can say as did his: "Robert was always a good boy"? And the promise of the 
boy was completely fulfilled in the man. 

At the death of his father, Robert, then only eleven years old, was left prac- 
tically the head of the little family, as his older brother was studying at Har- 
vard. Nobly did he fulfill the trust, and cared for the invalid mother with all 
the love and tenderness of his nature. Up to this time he had been attending 
school in Alexandria, but now, feeling that he must follow in his father's steps, 
he left for West Point where, after the four years' course, he graduated second 
in his class. 

The mother lived only long enough to see her brightest dreams realized in 
the handsome, strong man, with true heart and dauntless courage. Lee's devo- 
tion to his family is proverbial, and is it not strange that this man, who was 
so passionately fond of his home, should be fated to spend most of his time 
away from it? We all know what a noble record he made in the Mexican War, 
and how he returned at last with the praises of his commander ringing in his 
ears. There were but a few years of peace, however, before the storm which 
had been gathering so long, burst in all its fury. Devoted as he was to the 
Union, for which his father before him had fought, we can imagine with what 
sorrow he saw his beloved Mother-State withdraw from it, for he, like many 
other Virginia gentlemen, did not believe in the right of secession. But his 
duty was clear, and fearing that he might be called upon to fight against his 
own people, Lee at once resigned his commission in the United States Army and 
soon after accepted the command of the Army of Northern Virginia. 

It is needless for me to speak of that bitter time when men fought as they 
fight only for all that is dearest. And through all there rides the noble figure 
of Lee cheering, commanding, leading his men, whose idol he was. The devo- 
tion of his men was beautiful, and there was not one of them who would not 
have gladly laid down his life for "Marse Robert." 

And then, when the end came, the South stood appalled. Lee conquered! 
Then indeed was all lost and the time came to furl the tattered flag, under 
whose folds so many had bled and died for the "Lost Cause." 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



The great commander now hoped to retire to private life, but his country still 
had heed of him, and he was asked to take charge of Washington College. And 
so he who had led his people on the battle field now sought to teach them how 
best to become good citizens of the re-united country. His old soldiers gathered 
around him and took up again the studies which had been interrupted by four 
years of blood-shed. 

During his term as President of Washington College, Lee was asked to run 
for Governor of Virginia, and although he knew that if he did so he would be 
unanimously elected, he refused, fearing that it might stir up strife in the land 
already rent and torn by the long war. 

During October, 1870, the prayers of the whole Southland rose in agony that 
this dear life might be spared to them yet a little longer, but God saw fit to call 
his faithful servant home, and so the tired heart at last found rest. 

There in Lexington, his sheathed sword by his side, lies he who will be forever 
enshrined in the hearts of all the South as all that is noblest, truest, and 
bravest-Robert Edward Lee. Fanny McRee. 

And then, after the reading, with the hearty singing of the all-familiar 
"Dixie," the exercises were closed and each went to her place and pleas- 
ure, thinking of Lee and feeling, too, 

Oh, it's good to be in Dixie, 
Hooray, iiooray; 
In Dixie Land I'll take my stand, 
To lib and die in Dixie, 

Away,' away, away down South in Dixie. 



STORIETTES. 



. A GKEAT SACEIFICE. 

Old man Johnson's store was closed, and old man Johnson was sitting 
in the little room behind it before a large wood fire. He had an open 
letter in his hand and he seemed to be thinking deeply. And^ why 
shouldn't he ? For had he not just received a letter from one of his old 
veteran friends saying that a meeting of the veterans was to take place 
the following month at the city where this friend lived and that he 
wanted Johnson to attend it ? This was what the old man was so deeply 
thinking of, for he was very poor and it would take a lot of money to 
bring him to the place where the veterans were to meet, and he was so 
anxious to go ? He had saved ten dollars and it would cost twenty-five 
at the least for his journey, so he had the fifteen to make in a month. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



However, he determined to do it with a great deal of saving. So he 
sent word to his friend that he would come if nothing prevented: and 
then began working hard to make the fifteen dollars — and this he did 
in the month's time. 

It was the night before he was to start for the veteran's meeting, and 
the old man was again seated before the fire in the little back room with 
the precious twenty-five dollars safely hidden in the cupboard. He did 
not know when he had been so happy, at least not since Mabel had left 
him five years before. Mabel was his only child, and she had eloped 
with a man whom her old father had told her not to marry. He had 
not heard from her now in five years — and did not even know if she was 
living. He still loved her, and many were the times he longed for her 
to make him happy and take care of him in his old age. But he was 
very happy to-night. His ragged uniform which he had worn during 
the war was all dusted and laid out for the morrow, and many were the 
glances of pride that he gave it. Just then the bell of the little store 
rang and the postman handed him a letter with an unknown postmark 
but with a handwriting that made him begin to tremble. He hurriedly 
tore it open and read : 

My Dearest Father: — I know this letter will not be a welcome one to you, 
but nevertheless I am obliged to write it, for I want you to forgive me, father, 
for the wrong I did you five years ago. I see now how right you were when you 
told me not to marry that man, for I was never for one moment happy with 
him. We were oh, so poor, and how hard I did have to work to support us and 
our little baby daughter. But my husband died a month ago and I have been 
struggling along since then. I want to come to you now, father, and to hear 
you say that you forgive me and want me to live with you, and I am sure I 
can make you happy in your old age, and I know you will love your little 
granddaughter. Please, dear father, send me twenty-five dollars for my trip 
home, and as soon as I get it I will be with you the following day. I hope you 
will be willing to forgive me, dearest father, for I am so sorry. Hoping to hear 
from you soon, I remain, your penitent and loving daughter, Mabel. 

As her father read this note his face went through a number of 
changes. How glad he was that Mabel wanted to be forgiven and 
wanted to come home ! He would willingly forgive his only child — but 
the money necessary to bring her to him. He had not a cent in the 
world but the twenty-five dollars that was going to give him so much 
pleasure the next day. It would take over two months to make that 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



amount again, and during- that time his only child might be starving. 
All he would have to do was to send her the amount that was to take him 
to the veteran's meeting; how could he send her that and give up the 
pleasure of ■attending the meeting ? It would be a great sacrifice, but he 
was equal to it. That very night he sent a telegram to his friend, say- 
ing that he could not attend the meeting, and to his child he sent a letter 
of forgiveness and his precious twenty-five dollars. Was it not a great 

• no *•« -l*«-« 

sacrifice s 

"A MOUNTAIN WEDDING." 
A party of enthusiastic mountain climbers hurried in to breakfast 
at an unusually early hour one morning. Tor once Jim the waiter 
seemed anxious for them to begin their journey. When the leader oi 
the party told him that they did not expect to return until late m the 
afternoon and for him to be sure to be on hand, so they could have a 
hasty supper and then go to the "Heights" to see the sunset, Jim's face 
became very red and he stammered, "Well, Mr. Brown, you will have 
to git Tom, fer I— I's going to git mar-married to-night." He at once 
received the congratulations of the party. Miss Cramp, the most ro- 
mantic of them all, proposed that they attend, and after inquiring the 
time it was agreed all should go and each take a present to the bride. 

After a day on one of the highest peaks this side of the Rockies and 
a ride of five miles beyond to a village to purchase the presents, they 
arrived at the hotel just in time to make a hasty toilet, and with Tom 
as guide started at once for the bride's home. This was a great occa- 
sion among these simple people, as the bride was a favorite among them, 
and also because the village minister was to officiate. The bride was a 
typical mountain girl of about eighteen years of age and looked pic- 
turesque in a white muslin dress and a veil of mosquito netting pinned 
on with sweet peas, while in her hand she carried an immense bunch of 
red and yellow dahlias. 

She stood in the opposite corner of the room in which the ceremony 
was to be performed, the guests all around her waiting for the groom. 
At last the waiting became painful, for this was only a one-roomed house 
and the unusual number of guests made it crowded. In exactly an 
hour after the party arrived the groom appeared, radiant in a dress-suit 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



which one of the beaux from the hotel had given him for the special 
benefit of Miss Crump, who had been heard to say during the day that 
she wished they could give him a suit of clothes for the occasion. Of 
course every one now understood the delay. He looked quite uncom- 
fortable, although later in the evening he was heard to say that he had 
never felt well dressed before. The bride, on the other hand, was 
naturally not in the best of humors. The ceremony started, the min- 
ister using the Episcopal service. When Jim's time came to say "I 
will/' he could have been heard several yards away. The minister 
turning to the bride began, "Wilt thou have this man to be thy wedded 
husband, wilt thou obey — " She said in a loud voice, "No, I won't do 
no such thing," and the minister finished without repeating the objec- 
tional part. When the ceremony was finished Jim turned and gave his 
bride a smacking kiss, to which she returned, "Now you jest quit yer 
foolishness right now." 

The guests soon left, each feeling as if he had lost nothing in not 
going to see the sunset, and even the young man who was minus a suit 
of clothes never seemed happier. 



Examination Echoes. 



January 18-24, 1906. 
Leaf from a Diary. 
Friday: English held the floor; 
Talked it, wrote it, o'er and o'er. 

French on Saturday: Did it well; 
Won the approval of Mademoiselle. 

Latin, Monday: With a will. 
"Yeni, vidi, — vici" — nil. 

'Twas on Tuesday History came: 
Causes, — dates, too — rather lame. 

Tuesday evening: Science done! 
Never felt so much like fun. 

Wednesday: Knew a lot of Math. 
Don't know what caused teacher's wrath. 

Wednesday evening: Bible! good! 
Got a hundred, as I should! 

Well done! 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



The Seniors ( !) with all the zeal of Freshmen worked off the following 
on the poor Latin teacher, and still they passed. Class of 1904, think 
of it ! For even Lillian Farmer to affectionately write on her paper : 
"Himcine solem tarn nigrum surrexe mini," and to subscribe herself 
affectionately, "O me perditum, O afflictum." And then, in addition, 
for Kuth to "surreptitiously" insert this sparkling "original" : 

"Non paratus," R. F. dixit 

Cum a sad 'and doleful look. 
"Omne rectum," Prof, respondit, 
"Nihil," scripsit in his book. 

L. 



The "exam." is long and hard and dreary, 

I scratch and my pen is never weary ; 
My hand it clings to the paper white 
And I fling the ink, while I write and write — 

And the "exam." is hard and dreary. 

Yes, my hand is numb and tired and weary ; 
My vision's blurred and my head is dreary ; 

There's many an answer I cannot write : 

My mark, I fear, will be out of sight. 
And the prospect's far from cheery. 

(We really don't know who she was imitating when she wrote this, 
but she has our sincere sympathy, nevertheless.— M.) 



MY AIRSHIP THAT RAILED. 



(If you never dream please don't try to read this.) 
Examinations were over and I had been going up in an airship for 
several hours. I hadn't heard from my marks yet, but I had reached 
the nineteenth degree of happiness. Sailing over to France, I congratu- 
lated the people on their beautiful language; but I found them very, 
stupid when they kept on asking questions I couldn't answer and the 
2 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



crowds would gather around me — one gets tired of being praised all 
the time. I felt my head growing tight about my forehead, and I told 
the conductor of my airship to hasten on, as my happiness was supreme 
only in finding a new admirer. I had the airship stop at Rome and 
asked for Virgil, for I felt sure he would be honored to meet me, and 
to-day I was trying to be unusually benevolent. "Benevolent" is a word 
I had acquired just before examinations, but my host of admirers will 
never know it. 

Monsieur Virgil must have been fishing for crabs somewhere, for he 
didn't come immediately, so I hastened on, forgetting for the while how 
disappointed he would be not to see me. Just thousands hastened to 
see me everywhere, and I had to get the conductor to tie tighter band- 
ages across my head, I thought at first it would disfigure my beauty, but 
the crowds still came to see me. I climbed the Alps and cut my way 
through them with Herod the "Petrarch," and then I got tired and 
leaving the poor fellow in tears took to my airship again. Finally, 
being exhausted all at once, I told my conductor to take me to a place 
where there were no people, for really my headache was becoming so 
bad that all the smelling salts in Ethiopia would have done me no good. 
Setting me down quietly he took me to a desert isle — at least I supposed 
so, for not even a single soul came rushing ready to fall at my feet. My 
conductor, with tears streaming down his brawny cheeks, showed me a 
sign on a square-looking building right in front of me. My head hurt so 
I got him to read what was written on it — "St Mary's School" — he said 
slowly. Ah, yes, I remembered I went there when I was a little girl a 
long time ago. When I opened the door, rusty with age, I saw forms 
in white dresses flitting in and out. I started to rail abuses at my 
conductor for telling me there were no people there, but he promised 
most faithfully that they would not bother me, and I went in. Every- 
body had white hair like their dresses, and when I came in gave hysteri- 
cal giggles and fled away. From the first my head grew better until 
it was entirely well. Finally my conductor said, "Wait here a minute 
until I come back." He left me near an open window, dusty and dirty, 
and presently I heard my name called from inside, and when I looked 
into the window, there were twenty-nine sages with tottering steps and 



The St. Mary's Musk. 



white locks moving around. One of them was reading in a high, 
cracked voice — "Mary Smith, 72 on French, 51 on Latin, and 16 on 
Bible — an excellent report for a young lady!" 

***** ***** 

Next morning, like Buster Brown, I made some resolutions. 

(1) Do not go up in an airship ever. 

(2) Do not eat potted ham and green and yellow candy after exams., 
or they will do you a mean trick. A. W. S. 



The Bispham Concert. 



No musical event of recent seasons has been looked forward to more 
eagerly nor more thoroughly enjoyed, not only by the pupils and teachers 
of St. Mary's but by the music lovers of Raleigh generally, than the 
concert of Mr. David Bispham on the evening of Monday, February 12. 
The enthusiastic approval of Mr. Bispham's singing that was freely 
expressed by those who had heard him, the energetic work of Mr. and 
Mrs. Sanborn in making the arrangements which assured the success 
of the concert, and the presence of a large and representative audience 
to greet the singer ; the presence of goodly delegations from our sister 
schools, with the larger delegation from St. Mary's ; all were factors in 
the success of the concert, but in it all the singer was supreme, and as 
he sang all else was forgotten. 

The most disagreeable of rainy days made the weather conditions 
especially unfavorable to the enjoyment of the evening. The concert 
was given in the Academy of Music under the auspices of St. Mary's — 
but despite the mud and the rain that had to be encountered in getting 
to and from the special cars, there was no complaint at St. Mary's. 

Mr. Bispham was at his best, the program was entirely pleasing, 
the accompanist was all that any singer could have asked. These were 
the general opinions. Technical criticism would be out of place here 
even though it would all be favorable. It is enough to say that the 
singing was a revelation to many, a delight to all; and the dramatic 
power of the artist added much to the effectiveness of his voice. 
"Edward" will linger long in the minds of most of those who heard it. 



10 The St. Mary's Muse. 



This was the program: 

O Ruddier than the Cherry (Acis and Galatea) Haendel 

An Old Sacred Lullaby Corner 

The Two Grenadiers Schumann 

The Monk Meyerbeer 

The Wanderer, 

Hark, Hark, the Lark, J. Schubert 

The Erlking, 

Tom, the Rhymer, 

Edward, Loew€ 



The Wedding Song, 

Prologue, from Pagdiacci Leoncavallo 

I'm Wearin' Awa', Jean Arthur Foote 

Ring Out, Wild Bells Gounod 

Danny Deever Walter Damrosch 

The Dream of Little Rhys Old Welsh 

Kelly's Cat Old Irish 

Annie Laurie Old Scotch 

Young Richard Old English 

Accompanist Harold 0. Smith 

After the concert we St. Mary's girls had the pleasure of a very brief 
invasion of stage-land in order to meet Mr. Bispham and Mr. Smith, 
and it took only this concluding pleasure to fill to the brim our cup of 
appreciation. Thank you, Mr. Sanborn ; come again, Mr. Bispham. 



THE WEEK OF ST. VALENTINE'S SENTIMENT. 



To My Valentine. 



(Verses sent with some violets.) 

I chose these simple flowers, Sue, 

To be my messengers for me, 
They're only violets large and blue 

And yet they carry love to thee. 

They seem like bits of summer skies 

And yet I love them more, my dear, 
Because of looking like your eyes, 

So blue, so innocent and fair. S. C. 



The St. Mary's Muse. U 



Miss Thomas' Reception. 



On the night of February 14th, Miss Thomas, the honorary member 
of the Class of 1906, gave a delightful Valentine party to the members 
of the Senior Class and the English Certificate pupils. When the 
latest guests had finally put in their appearance, we were served to 
delicious punch by Miss Meares, who assisted the hostess. Then cards 
in the shape of hearts, daintily decorated in the class colors, dark blue 
and old gold, were distributed and the guests were bidden to write a 
valentine. The poetic genius of the class may be imagined from the 
following production of Gertrude Sullivan, who received the prize. 
(Gertrude wishes it understood that she does not base her claim to fame 
on this composition: it is a "ten minutes for refreshments" production 

only. ) 

We're told to write a Valentine; 
I'm sure the rest will all be fine. 
If you'll be mine, 'tis all I'll ask 
Of the honorary member of our class. 

And think of Mary Lassiter writing this : 

Here's to my Valentine! Though she be fair 
There's many another girl with sunny hair. 
Here's to my Valentine! Though she be swell 
There's many another girl I love quite well. 
So here's a gentle hint to my sweetheart- 
Be good to me— then we will never part. 

The next part of the program was even more difficult, but it afforded 
lots of fun. On the back of our valentines we had to draw a caricature 
of our neighbor, and the best artist was determined from the picture 
the identity of which was most frequently guessed. Some of the pic- 
tures were, as Miss Fenner would say, "wild and wooly," and it struck 
me as peculiar that not one of the girls could by any possibility find a 
picture of herself. Nancy Fairley's picture of Gertrude Sullivan was 
guessed the most, and she received a pretty picture-frame as a reward. 
' Then refreshments were served. First, a salad course, and then ice- 
cream and cake. Our glasses were filled and we ended a most enjoyable 
evening with a hearty toast to the Class of Naughty Six, to the certifi- 
cate pupils, and to Our Honorary Member. S. 



12 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Junior=Senior Reception, 1906. 



The annual reception of the Junior Class in honor of the Seniors, 
given this year on the evening of Saturday, February 17th, was in every 
way a delightful success. With the Valentine spirit still uppermost, 
the entertainment took the form of a Heart Party, and the French Room 
in the "Far Countree" had been transformed into a veritable Cupid's 
bower for the occasion. 

The guests were received by the officers of the Class of 1907, Misses 
Lillian Farmer, Emily Garrison, Eula Gregory and Leonore Seay, and 
after the warm greeting found themselves in Cupid's Garden. Hearts 
on the walls, hearts overhead, only no hearts underfoot, (that left for 
later experiences). A Tennysonian would surely express it — 

"Hearts to the right of us, 
Hearts to the left of us, 
Hearts all about us, 

Fluttered and flustered." 

And in the midst of the array, in the very center of a mammoth heart, 
stood Cupid himself, arrow in hand, apparently all ready for his victims, 
truly a cause for "fluttering and flustering." But those unsentimental 
Juniors had reversed the ordinary method of procedure, for while 
Cupid was kept chained tiny bows and arrows were placed in the 
Seniors' hands and they were commanded — not to defend themselves 
merely, but — to attempt to pierce the heart of Cupid ! Think of it ! 
What wonder that the arrows flew wild, that the ceiling, the floor, even 
the by-standers would fain have taken refuge from the expert marksman, 
and though one, less skillful than the rest — Oh, prosy Senior — actually 
touched the heart (of the mammoth, not of Cupid), the end of the eve- 
ning found the little gentleman still unscathed, and promising many 
future favors to his erring friends. 

Yes, the evening was merry, the entertainment entertaining, the re- 
freshments most delicious. Thank you, Juniors; may the Class of 
1908 show you in your turn as delightful an attention as you in your 
time bestowed upon the members of the Class of 1906. X. 



The St. Masy's Muse. 13 



In Lighter Vein. 

Harriett E. Ruff, Editor. 



Senior M. L.— "St Paul's head was cut off, placed on a waiter and 
handed to the king's daughter." 
All laugh. 
C. Gant (laughing heartily.— "O goodness ! Mary, that was Blue 

Beard." _____ 

Kate Gary.— "Page, what is your favorite poem ?" 
Page Shelburn — "Tennyson's Evangeline." 

Dr. Du Bose (in Bible Class).— "Now, you think twenty-minute 
sermons are so dreadful : St. Paul preached three months." 

Helen Alston.— "But don't you suppose he stopped some to rest V 

Little Johnnie had a mirror; 
He ate the back all off, 

Thinking madly in his fancy- 
It would cure the whooping-cough. 



First Girl. — "Do you spell church with a capital ?" 
Second Girl.— "Not unless its chapel." 

Alice McC— "Yes, Elizabeth City is a dry town." 

Dorothy M.— "Why, don't they have any water to drink there ?" 

Mr. Stone. — "What is the masculine of aunt?" 
Page S— "Antics." 

FROM THE SEWANEE "MOUNTAINEER.") 

"Now if, my dear, you're chilly, 

(He said as in alarm), 
Just remember that I carry 

Your shawl upon my arm." 
But when the maid so coyly 

Replied on mischief bent, 
"Yes, please put it 'round me," 

He wondered which she meant. 



14 The St. Mary's Muse. 

(With deepest apologies to the Faculty, and assuring the said Ladies 
of the Day of our earnest sympathy.) 

THE "LADY OF THE DAY." 

You must wake and call me early, call me early, sister dear, 
For to-morrow is the saddest time of all the glad New Year. 
Of all the days of the week, sister, the dreariest far and away, 
For I'm to be "lady of the day, sister," I'm to be "lady of the day." 

It begins in the morning early when we to Chapel go, 

I must see that the girls walk straight in line, not too fast, nor yet too slow, 

That they do not laugh or chatter, or cut capers on the way, 

When I'm the "lady of the day," sister, when I'm the "lady of the day." 

One girl is quite a talker, and another is noisy and gay, 
And a third keeps the ball a-rolling with her chum all the live-long day. 
And I must carefully note down all the mischief they do or say, 
When I'm the "lady of the day," sister, when I'm the "lady of the day." 

The excuses to sign after school time is indeed quite a serious task, 
And I must hunt up all the girls for whom the visitors ask, 
And I must see that they walking go and don't hide in corners away, 
When I'm the "lady of the day," sister, when I'm the "lady of the day." 

And when evening comes I must keep the peace and note that the voices are low, 
And see that the girls sit on benches and chairs, and not on the table, or so 
That they dutifully dance in the parlor and don't steal to their rooms away, 
When I'm the "lady of the day," sister, when I'm the "lady of the day." 

And the number of bells to attend to all through the day, you see, 
Why the old Swiss bell-ringers, the real ones, they are not in it with me, 
And the last one is at 9:30; when "Glory!" and "Thank Goodness!" I say, 
For that is the last of the day, sister, the last of the "lady of the day." 

Oh, why do the gentlemen teachers have such an easy time, 

As if working hard and so steady for them would be a crime? 

They look askance and seem to smile as if they meant to say: 

We can't be the "lady of the day," sister, we can't be the "lady of the day." 

When the merry, merry Spring-time comes, and all is calm and serene, 
I'll enjoy a well-earned vacation, a rest and a change of scene. 
Yet in my dreams in the night-time, though hundreds of miles away, 
I'll still be the "lady of the day," sister, I'll still be the "lady of the day." 

Anon. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



^ ._ x- r* ^ v~„- = One Dollar. 

Subscription, One Year. = - - - 

c- Ji #-~„j~~ = = Fifteen Cents. 

Single Copies, = - - - 

A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh 
N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumnae, under the editorial management of the 
Senior Class. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to^ ^ MARY , g MUSE; 

Correspondence from friends solicited. baleigh, n. 

Editorial Board. 

Ruth Foster, '06, Editor-in-Chief. Jane Iredell Green, '06, Business Manager. 

Francis E. Woolf, '06. Margaret Mackay, '06. Lillian Farmer, 07. 

Literary Department. 

MARY T. LASSITER, '06. GERTRUDE SULLIVAN, 06. 

SPECIAL EDITORS FOR FEBRUARY. 
Lillian Farmer, '06, Chief, Margaret DuBose, *05; Serena C. Bailey. 



Apology. 



The Faculty Manager of the Muse oiues a deep apology for the delay 
in the publication of this February number, not only to the readers of 
the Muse, but to the special Board of Editors, who were particularly 
prompt in getting the copy into his hands, and who are much chagrined 
at the delay. He desires here to make the apology. 



Editorial. 



The regular Board of Editors now being completely occupied with 
preparations for the publication of the annual Muse, the February 
monthly is gotten out by the special board. The special editors for 
March will be Misses Farmer, Garrison and Hill. 



When the Muse appears February will be about over. January- 
February gone! Examinations finished and the new term well begun; 
reports in the hands of those loving parents who are so proud of our 
good work ; the birthdays of Lee and Washington, with their accompany- 
ing half-holidays, past, and no more birthdays to be anticipated in the 



16 The St. Mary's Muse. 

immediate future; the last of the Chapter entertainments and of the 
after-Christmas social diversions enjoyed ; and the quiet of Lent upon us. 
As we have enjoyed the gayety, so will we now try to profit by the 
self-restraint; we will govern our minds and our longings, and, improv- 
ing the Lenten days as they pass, look forward to the joyousness of the 
fast-approaching Eastertide. 



A SAD CASE OF INSPIRATION. 



(Adapted from the Woodoerry Forest Oracle, December.) 

The glorious days of autumn had 

Been rushing madly by; 

The wintry winds were blowing 

Flitting shadows 'cross the sky. 

I sat at my table thinking, 

Thinking hard about The Muse, 

Praying for an inspiration 

That our readers might peruse (or amuse). 

All in vain I tried to make my 

Thoughts rise grandly to their flood, 

'Twas a time of ebb — (or tongue) — tide, 

I stuck feebly in the mud. 

When lo! behold! a little fly 

Fell right upon my table, 

And 'gan to kick its tiny legs 

As hard as it was able. 

Prone on its little back it lay 

And battled hard for life, 

But nature's laws must needs be filled, 

Death had to end the strife. 

No mourners were there at the end, 

Nor did it have a casket, 

I tenderly embalmed it in the Ed 

Itorial paper basket. 

And with an exclamation 

Seized hard my inspiration. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 17 



SCHOOL NEWS. 



— Sousa's Band was in Kaleigh, January 24th. Of course as many 
went as possible, and the evening was thoroughly enjoyable. 

—We miss George Shaw. Her excellent record the first quarter 
makes us even more greatly regret her sickness. She has our sympathy, 
and we hope that after a complete rest she may come back to us her 

old self. 

—Saturday evening, January 13th, was very pleasantly devoted to 
an informal dance. The figures, which were very pretty, were led by 
Elise Emerson. One of the most enjoyable features of the evening was 
the delightful music rendered by Mr. Hodgson and Mrs. Irvine. 

—The annual concert of the A. and M. Glee Club at the Academy of 
Music on the evening of January 30 was a treat. A large party was in 
attendance and school spirit was in the air. Miss Cribbs of the St. 
Mary's faculty, the elocutionist of the evening, added much to the 
program. 

—Miss Kate Cheshire, Diocesan Secretary of the Woman's Auxiliary, 
visited St. Mary's on the evening of Sunday, the 18th, and greeted us 
again quite informally. Miss Cheshire's genuine love for girls is so 
evident that it is always doubly pleasant to have her with us, and she 
never fails to leave us encouraged. 

—Several of the girls have been made very happy recently by visits 
from their parents. Bishop Strange paid a brief visit to the school early 
in the month, Mrs. Croswell was in town for a week, Mrs. Corbett was 
with us at the school for a few days and enjoyed the Bispham Concert, 
and others have taken briefer glimpses. 

—We are glad to hear of the reorganization of the Sketch Club. ^ At 
a meeting on January 31st the following officers were elected: Critic, 
Miss Eenner; President, Leonore Seay ; Vice-President, Jennie Morris; 
Secretary-Treasurer, Serena Bailey. The members are: Helen Alston, 
Nell Atkinson, Serena Bailey, Helen Breeden, Mary Cooper, Elise 
Emerson, Estelle Earrior, Lalla Hamlet, Jessie Harris, Irving Morgan, 
Jennie Morris, Bliss Perry, Eloise Robinson, Lenore Seay, Mildred 
Smith, Marion Slocomb, Helen Strange, and Margaret Wilson. 



18 The St. Mary's Muse. 



— Mr. DuBose was absent from St. Mary's from the 7th to the 17th 
on a South Carolina trip in the interest of the school. He had very 
pleasant visits to Columbia, Charleston, Sommerville, Florence, Sumter, 
Orangeburg and Fayetteville. Many of the girls felt a little tinge of 
envy when they learned that he had seen their home-folks so recently. 
Mr. DuBose is going to let us write up some of the impressions of the 
trip for the next Muse. 

— There have been two very interesting "Thursday Talks" since the 
last Muse. The first, by Superintendent Moses of the Ealeigh Schools, 
on January 25th, was on the "Education of a Girl," in which Mr. Moses 
expressed his well-known views with regard to woman's training and 
the best all-round education. The second, on February 1, was by State 
Superintendent Joyner, on another phase of woman's usefulness. Both 
of the talks were both helpful and enjoyable, while it was additionally 
pleasant to know better these gentlemen who are taking such a useful 
part in the movement for the advancement of the cause of education 
in the State. 

— The visit of Dr. Guerry, Chaplain of the University of the South, 
in the last week of January, was both very pleasant and very stimula- 
ting. Dr. Guerry, who is traveling in the interest of the new All Saints 
Memorial Chapel at Sewanee, was in Ealeigh for some days, and was 
for a part of the time the guest of Mr. DuBose at the Bectory. We 
all enjoyed hearing him at Christ Church, where he preached on Sunday, 
the 2 2d, about Sewanee and the Chapel, and still more on Wednesday 
evening, the 25th, when he talked to us at the afternoon Chapel service 
on Christian Education. The visit of Dr. Guerry recalled that very- 
pleasant one of Dr. Mies, of Columbia, last Commencement; both left 
us feeling better for their visits, and we look forward to a return of both 
of them with great pleasure. 



ALUMNAE MATTERS 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 

St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 

President, - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

(Mrs. M. T. Leak, Durham. 
„ T*~„«,™™r m = Mrs. I. M. Pittenger, Raleigh, 
Vice-Presidents, j Mrs _ p p TuciLe l R'aieighf 

(.Mrs. Kate de R. Meares, Wilmington. 
Sec.-Treas., - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 



Alumnae Notes. 



The dearth of alumnae news continues. We wish to make another 
extra effort to enlist the co-operation of the alumna? in the publication 
of the Muse. There has been no reason for complaint at the school on 
account of lack of sympathy among the alunime with the purposes of the 
Muse, and the alumnee have done their full share in the matter of 
subscriptions, though the subscription-list should be double what it now 
is; but the help that was extended last year in the way of letters and 
news contributions seems to have been almost altogether discontinued 
this session. We are therefore driven to depend upon the stray informa- 
tion that may be brought to our notice and the alumnae part of the paper 
has certainly fallen back. 

The April number of the Muse will be a number especially devoted 
to the contributions of old girls. We hope that there may be many news 
contributions and notes of interest, but we shall make a definite effort 
to have a series of reminiscences by alumna? representing each period 
of the life of St. Mary's from the beginning, an informal picture of 
the St. Mary's life from the days before the war down to the present. 
To insure the success of this number and its interest to all, we now ask 
every alumna whose eye this copy of the Muse may reach .to give her 
Alma Mater at least a few moments of definite thought and to jot down 
and send to the Muse any items of interest, — news, recollections, or 
suggestions. We are not asking for literary contributions, though we 
should be glad to have them, but what we want is the facts, and we 
shall appreciate those facts if given in the form of notes as much as 
whatever may be furnished in the form of finished contributions. Do 
let us hear from you. 



20 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



It is a great pleasure to be again able to quote from a letter of Mrs. 

Win E. Lindsay, of the Class of '79 : 

Glendale, S. C, January 30. 

My Dear Girls:— You are very badly treated by tbe alumnse, and I don't 
wonder you feel slightly indignant. I, for one, am ashamed of my dilatormess, 
and herein enclose my subscription, due, I believe, since last November or 
December You see the Christmas month is a strenuous one and demands all 
the time and money that most of us have to spare, hence one reason for delay. 

Why the alumna do not write for the Muse I do not understand. Surely 
among all the hundreds of her "old girls" there must be many who are gifted 
in that line and who love their alma mater sufficiently to devote a little time 

to her. . 

By the way, I thought I was an "alumna," but every now and then some sin- 
gular person" is put down as an "alumnae," and I think that being very rusty, 
and never much, in Latin, I must be wrong! 

I am very much interested in the memorial altar to Drs. Aldert and Bennett 
Smedes. I, with hundreds of others, owe them more than I can express. Will 
you kindly hand the enclosed, after deducting my subscription to the Muse, 
to Mr. DuBose for the altar? 

Thanking you for continuing to send the Muse, I remain, 

Most sincerely yours, Ella Tew Lindsay. 

Do you care for the names of such of the alumna? as live in my neighborhood 
and their present occupations? Perhaps I could induce one of them to write 
some reminiscences of St. Mary's many years ago. 

We feel sure that Mrs. Lindsay will pardon the publication of this 
letter, and it touches so directly on the matters in which the alumnae 
can help the Muse so greatly that it is a stronger appeal than anything 
we could say. Each matter— the subscription, the altar, the alumnae 
lists, the reminiscences — is fraught with meaning for us. 



The fund for the new memorial altar is rapidly accumulating, and 
made up as it is of contributions from within the present school and 
gifts from without, it will be what it is intended to be, a loving memorial 
of the St. Mary's girls of all generations. The fund now amounts to 
$150 of the $300 needed. 

The following letter gives an idea of the spirit of the contributions 
from the past: 
Rev. McNeely DuBose, Norfolk, Va., February 13th. 

Deab Sib:— I have just heard from one of my sisters of the enlarging of the St. 
Mary's Chapel, and that the Guild of Trinity Church, Asheville, helped toward 



The St. Mary's Muse. 21 

the payment of it. She further adds in her letter that you wish the new altar 
to be in memory of Dr. Aldert Smedes and his son, Rev. Mr. Bennett Smedes, 
who were both Rectors and Principals of the school, Mr. Bennett succeeding hia 
father. Enclosed please find my contribution to the altar, which I most will- 
ingly send; my only regret is that I cannot send a larger amount. 

I was educated at St. Mary's during the old Doctor's lifetime; going there 
when I was ten and staying for seven years, and the little Chapel was built when 
I was a little child, and I was afterwards confirmed there by our dear old 
Bishop Atkinson. Dr. Smedes was like a father to me, as indeed he was good 
to all his girls; always thinking of our comfort and happiness. How I wish I 
could see the dear old place! 



Sincerely yours, 



Lenten Services, 1906 



SUNDAYS 

,00 



, f , ^ ■ ( First and Third Sundays at 

Holy Communion j Qther Sundays ^ ?3Q 

Sunday School 10 a. m. Evening Prayer, with Lecture, 5.00 

Morning Prayer, daily, at 9.05 

- r • r> f Monday, Wednesday, Friday, at 5.30 

Evening Prayer { Tuesday; TnursclaV) Saturday, at 6.45 

Holy Communion, Thursday and Saints' Days, at 7.00 a. m. 
Confirmation Lectures, Sunday Evenings, at 7.00 



In the death of Dr. John Smedes, which occurred at his home in 
Washington, D. C, on January 19th, another of the figures who once 
were closest to the life of St. Mary's has passed into the Beyond. 



It was very pleasant during the middle of February to have a brief 
visit from Mrs. Richard. Slade, of Columbus, Ga., who as Sue Hunter, 
of Columbus, spent the sessions of '80 and '81 at St, Mary's. This was 
her first visit back in all the years, and she is now looking forward to the 
time, only a year or two hence, when her daughter will be ready to be 
at St. Mary's. 



22 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Among the marriages of the month we note that of Loulie Biggs, of 
Fayetteville, to Mr. E. K. McKetban, of the same city, on February 14, 
and of Ellen West, of Kaleigh, to Mr. John Dockery on February 15. 



TABER-JONES. 



Probably the event of the past month of greatest interest to the very 
recent alumna? was the marriage on February 15th, at Columbia, S. C, 
of Miss Augusta Porcher Jones (our old friend "Gussie") and Mr. Der- 
rill Darby Taber, of that city. The wedding, which was an elaborate 
one, was celebrated at 9 o'clock in Trinity Church, the Kector, Dr. Niles, 
officiating. 

In addition to the interest which St. Mary's takes in the bride, recip- 
rocating the interest which the bride has always shown in her Alma 
Mater, the bridal party was distinctly a St. Mary's bride's party, the 
Jones' attendants including Anne Gilford, '04, of Fort Monroe ; Marie 
Phinizy, of Augusta, Ga., ; Margaret DuBose, '05, of Ealeigh; Caro 
Brevard, of Charlotte, and Sumter Thomas, of Columbia. Fannie 
Johnson, of Ealeigh, also went to Columbia, for the wedding. 



READ i.-MARK, I— ACT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The MUSE generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



Established 1858 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



HAVE 



WHARTON 

TO MAKE YOUR 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

REMEMBER IT PAYS TO GET THE BEST 



The men of earth build houses, halls and chambers, roofs and domes — 
But the women of the earth — God knows — the women build the homes. 

— Nixon Waterman. 



THE DOBBIN-FERRALL GO, 



Dry Goods 

OF ALIv KINDS 




Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

LADLES FINE SHOES 5S5 SLIPPERS 



...Send to. 



ALFRED WILLIAMS I GO. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

BOOKS 



OF ALL KINDS 



SELECT LINE OF STATIONERY. 

Eastman's Kodaks and supplies. 
Office supplies. 



Advertisements. 



Hart-Ward Hardware Company 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Best of everything in Hardware. Satisfaction 

guaranteed or money refunded. All-right 

Cook Stoves, Celebrated Warm Air 

Heaters, the only perfect heater 

made. Write for prices. 

DARNELL & THOMAS, 
Pianos and Organs. 
Sheet music and small goods. 
Raleigh, N. C. 



KING'S GROCERY, 
"The Little Store." 



W. C. STRONACH'S SONS CO. 



GROCERS 



216 FAYETTEVILLE STREET 

KING'S UP-TO-DATE DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN. 
Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets. 

You'll find up-to-date Shoes at 

HUNTER BROS. & BREWER 



THE BOYLAN-PEARGE GO. 



Dry Goods, Millinery, 
Tailored Costumes, 
Gloves, Hosiery, 
Handkerchiefs, 
Fancy Goods, 
Underwear. 



Mail orders filled intelligently and promptly. 



FAYETTEVILLE AND SALISBURY STS. 

RALEIGH, K. C. 



.ROSENTHAL 
J CO. j 

G R Q C K R S 

136 FAYETTEVILLE STREET 



Advertisements. 



FOR QUICK COOKING 
nothing exceeds the 

GAS RANGE 

ALWAYS READY. NO DIRT OR ASHES 

FOR LIGHT 

Usethe best: THE WELSBACH LIGHT 

STANDARD GAS AND ELECTRIC CO. 

124 Fayetteville St. 



YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 
121 Fayetteville Street. 



J. SCHWARTZ, 

RICHMOND MARKET 

Meats of All Kinds. 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



One day our little Willie fell 
Down a deep and darksome well ; 
Mamma's worried 'bout his ways, 
Willie is so hard to raise. — Ex. 



CHARLES W. BARRETT-Architect 

Special Work in Fine Colonial Architecture. 

Author of 

"Colonial Southern Homes." 

115% Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 

"TENITMUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. 

R. B. RANEY, General Agent, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



GRIMES & VASS, 
Fire Insurance and Investments. 
Raleigh, N. C 



HELLER'S SHOE STORE. 
GYMNASIUM SHOES 



RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK. 

Capital 815,000 Surplus $25,000. Deposits oyer 
$600,000. Fou r per cent interest paid on deposits. 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON, 

COAL, WOOD AND ICE. 

122 Fayetteville St Raleigh, N. C. 



E. M. UZZELL & CO., 

PRINTERS AND BINDERS, 

ONLY HIGH GRADE WORK. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



INSURE AGAINST LOSS BY FIRE. 

Best Companies Represented. 

Bonding Solicited 

THE MECHANICS DIME SAVINGS BANK 

Raleigh, N. C. 



OAK CITY STEAM LAUNDRY. 

Promptness and Neatness with all work. 

Marshall & West, Props. 



POWELL, & POWELL, 

COAL AND WOOD, 

107 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



SAL VA TORE DBSIO, 

Manufacturing: Jeweler and Silversmith. 

1012 F. St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

On application will send any article selected. 
To St. Mary's, discount often per cent. 

J. S. MacDONALD & CO., Jewelers. 

Diamonds, Watches, Clocks, Silverware, 

Jewelry, Class Rings, Medals and 

Badges to order. 

217 N. Charles St. Baltimore, Md. 

WE WANT your patronage in everything in 
the Jewelry, Watch and Diamond line. We 
sell only the best goods and at most reason- 
able prices. We make all kinds of college, 
class and fraternity Jewelry. Our new cata- 
logue mailed FREE to any address. 

H. SlLVEETHOEN Co., 

917 Main St., Lynchburg, Va. 



ELLINGTON'S ART STORE, 

Raleigh, N. C. 
Everything in Art. 
Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs. 

For the most satisfactory work, 

Try RIGGSBEE at 
Watson & Co.'s Gallery. PHOTOGRAPHS, 



T. W. BLAKE, 

Rich Jewelry and Silverware. 

Repairing promptly done. 

JOLLY & WYNNE JEWELRY COMPANY, 
Wedding and Holiday presents. 
Fine Watch and Jewelry repairing. 



A . D U G H I , 

RESTAURANT AND ICE CREAM PARLOR. 

Confections, Foreign and Domestic Fruits. 

CATERER. 

St. Mary's folks know and approve of Dughi. 

Good things always at 

BRETSCH'S BAKERY. 

Buy ROYSTER'S Fine Candies. 

Private Dining and Banquet Halls at 

GIERSCH'S, 216 Fayetteville St. 



CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

at j. l. o'quinn & co. 

Leading Florists of North Carolina. 

Raleigh, N. C. 

H. STEINMETZ, 

FLORIST. 
Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns and all kinds 
Raleigh.] of Plants. [Phone 113 . 

ROBT. SIMPSON, Drog, KgJK5iS5; etc! 

JNO. P. HAYES, Photographer. 

Kodak work of all kinds. 



ANTICEPHALALG1NE cures quickly and 
safely Headache in all its forms. 



Advertisements. 



rhe National BanK of Raleigh, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 
Capital $225,000. Surplus and Profits $115,000. 

Chas. H. Belvin, President. 

Chas. E. Johnson, Vice-President. 

F. H. Briggs, Cashier 

J. B. Timberlake, Teller and Ass'tCashiei. 

Safe Deposit Boxes iu Fire and Burglar Proof 
Vault for rent at moderate cost. Absolutely 
iafe place for keeping valuables of all Kinas. 

THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 



If its furnishing the Home, Office, School Or 

Hall, see us. 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 

Cor. Wilmington and Hargett Streets, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



HICKS' DRUG STORE 
For Toilet Requisites and Cold Dbinks. 



All Phones. 



W. B. MANN, 

Groceries. 11 E. Hargett St. 



PESCUD'S PHARMACY, 
12 West Hargett St., Raleigh, N. C. 



The Citizens National Bank 

RALEIGH, N. C. 
Capital, - - ft 100,000.00 
Surplus, - - 100,000.00 

Deposits, - 1,000,000.00 

Personal Calls and Correspondence Invited 

J. G. Beown, Pres. H. E. Litchfoed, Cashier 

Our ECCLESIASTICAL ART Department is 
superbly equipped for the prompt and proper 
execution of fine church work such as Altars, 
Pulpits, Lecturns, Prayer Desks, Litany 
Desks, Rood Screens, Fonts, and similar 
furnishings. Write for special church fur- 
niture catalogue. 

HANN-WANGERIN-WEICKHARDT CO., 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 



THE J. D. RIGOAN COMPANY, 

Holiday Goods. 



GEO. MARSH & CO., 

Wholesale Groceries, Produce, Fruit, 
RALEIGH, N . C. 

ELLINGTON LUMBER COMPANY, 

All Sorts of Building Supplies, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Bri^c 



i 



fCOFFEE 

^BIST GROCERS { 



Don't forget to buy your Shoes of 

S. C. POOLE'S Shoe Store. 



PERRY & ROSENTHAL, Trust Bid* 
Ladies' Fine Shoes. 



DR. V. E. TURNER, 

Dentist. 



J. R. FERRALL & CO.— GROCERS. 

Best of everything in our line. 
22 Fayetteville Street. 



JOHN C. DREWRY. 
1 MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE." 



We make your shopping with us "pleasant 
as well as "profitable." 

A. B. STRONACH COMPANY. 

Outfitters for Ladies, Misses and Children. 

Commencement Dress Materials and Acces- 
sories—Gloves, Fans, Hosiery, Shoes,— receive 
our special attention. 

215 Fayetteville Street. 

STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES. 
Fruits, Vegetables and Country Pro- 
duce. The best of everything and at rock 
bottom prices. Special prices to schools and 
colleges D T. JOHNSON & SONS 

Phone 78. 163 Hargett St 

MISSES REESE & COMPANY, 

Millinery- 



Advertisements. 



SCHOOL PROGRAM. 



Feb 


17 


" 


22 


" 


24 


" 


28 



February-March, 1906. 
Saturday Evening: Junior-Senior Reception. 
Washington's Birthday: half-holiday. 

2:30 p. m. Exercises commemorating the day. 
Saturday Evening: St. Elizabeth's Chapter. 
Ash Wednesday: Holy Day. Services 7:30, 11:00, 5:30. 



SEABOARD 

AIR LINE RAILWAY 

PASSENGER DEPARTMENT 

Direct Line to All Points in the South, South-West, North and North-West . 

DOUBLE DAILY SERVICE BETWEEN Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, 
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Two trains every day between New York, "Washington, Norfolk-Portsmouth, and Atlanta, 
Birmingham, Memphis, Savannah and Jacksonville. Trains composed of Vestibule Day 
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For time-tables, winter or summer booklets illustrative of the South and South-West, apply 
to Seaboard Passenger Representatives, or address 

C. H. GATTIS, C. B. RYAN, EDWARD P. COST, 

Traveling Passenger Agent, General Passenger Agent, Second Vice-President, 

Raleigh, IS. C. Portsmouth, Va. Portsmouth, Va. 



-Garolinas. 

lie Healthy and Si 



tVi-Zf'^f-s.:?^ 



MARY'S SCH O O L , 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



{for girls and young women-). 



RUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER 21, J9K 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS, 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 25, 1906. 



uary's- , .v 

iction in these 
rtments: ^ 



1. THE COLLEGE.' 

2. -the:mwiG- school. 

j 3. the business school. - 
i the art school.- 

5. THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 



^HBK3SH£ffiSB9s£SlnB&9B6J5H9Bs 

>ejs ift tbe faculty. 




id, Progress^ 
Phxn 



jt^ Tweritfreigfrt 
witkout slight 



RECTOR, 






The St. Mary's Muse. 

LENT NUMBER. 



Vol. X. March, 1906. No. 8. 



The Legend of the Diamond and the Pearl. 

One day the king of all the gods 

Held in his hands two jewels fair : 
A diamond clear, surpassing bright, 

A pearl that was beyond compare. 

He placed the jewels on the ground 
And o'er the diamond waved his hand, 

And there within its place Man stood — 
Strong, brave and true, majestic, grand. 

Again his mighty hand he waved, 

And then again — 'twas wond'rous strange — 

Sweet, pure and beautiful, and calm, 
The pearl was into Woman changed. 

Helen Katharine Liddell. 



Summer is Coming. 



The wo Morse girls had promised to make their aunt a visit, and 
early October found them on the south-bound train, surrounded by candy 
and flowers, the offering of thoughtful friends. 

" Of course it will be dull after such a gay summer," said Dorothy, 
" but we'll have lots of fun running about the country." 

" Yes, indeed," agreed Nancy ; " it will be fine to ride and walk, and 
not have any engagements or anything to worry us. Mother says the 
old place is lovely, a typical Southern home, situated on the river." 

At the old homestead all was in a joyful state of confusion. The 



The St. Mart's Muse. 



long-expected nieces had arrived, and after a hot supper and a nice little 
chat with their aunt, had gone to bed. 

" I think Auntie is just lovely," said Dot. 

" Yes, indeed," Nancy murmured sleepily. 

The first few days were spent in riding, rowing, walking, and talking. 
One day the girls decided to go to the attic and see what they could find. 
After rummaging through several trunks, they pulled out a number of 
old-fashioned dresses. Dorothy suggested that they dress themselves in 
the faded silks and go down stairs. After putting on their dresses with 
odd hats to match, they went down to their aunt, who laughed and 
suggested that they go across the river to see a friend of hers. This 
suggestion was greeted with enthusiasm, and running down to the river 
the girls motioned to the old boatman to come and row them over. 

Soon the boat began to come their way, but much to their surprise, 
they saw that it was rowed, not by the old boatman, but by two young 
men in hunting suits; nevertheless, they took their seats in the boat. 
One of the men remarked that it was a beautiful day, at the same time 
casting a wondering glance at Dot's faded silk dress. This embarrassed 
the young lady so much that she nearly giggled aloud, but drawing down 
her veil with all the dignity she could muster, she turned to her sister 
and asked if the price of eggs had gone up. 

At last the river was crossed, and after thanking their boatmen the 
girls went into the house. They found no one at home, so they sat down 
and began to discuss the incident. 

" They'll think we are either fools or old maids," said ISTancy. 

" And the one with brown eyes was so good looking," said Dorothy ; 
" just my ideal man." 

" O Dot, you're such a goose ! " exclaimed her sister. 

They returned home in the usual way, and nothing more was seen or 
heard of the strange boatmen, although Dorothy found herself wonder- 
ing who they were, and although she would not admit it, even to herself, 
she wished that they would come back. 

A month passed very quickly at their aunt's, and the girls were sorry 
to say good-bye on the first of November. 

Once again in the city they thought no more of the little event, so 
full were their minds of the petty things which make up a social life. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



One clay while Dot was hurrying down the street she came face to 
face with the brown-eyed boatman ; she felt the color rise to her cheeks, 
but hastening on she assured herself she was a goose and that he hadn't 
recognized her. After that she could not help thinking of him, and 
time and time again she was sure that he was near her. 

Several months after their visit to their aunt the girls received invi- 
tations to a mask-ball given by one of the: most fashionable of their 
friends. 

" What shall I wear % " groaned Dorothy. 

" Why not wear the old blue dress your Auntie gave you ? " asked 
her mother. " I should think, with a few additions, it would be the 
very thing." 

" So it will," agreed Dot, "and it's just what I'll wear." 
The night of the ball came, and Dorothy, dressed in the old-fashioned 
gown, with a necklace and bracelet of pearls, was indeed strikingly 
beautiful. 

" You mustn't break any hearts, my child," laughed her mother as 
she kissed her good-bye. 

The ball-room was beautiful with its banks of flowers and palms, 
arranged with an artist's taste. 

" It looks just like a fairy paradise," exclaimed Dorothy, as she 
entered the room, and found herself at once surrounded by her friends. 
" Isn't it funny not to know your own friends in a crowd like this, but I 
really can't make out half the people. Nancy, who is that distinguished 
looking man? He keeps looking this way. I'm sure I've seen him 
somewhere." 

After the dancing began, the evening passed very quickly and pleas- 
antly. Just before the time came to unmask, Dorothy escaped from 
the crowd and went to a window to cool off. The "distinguished-looking 
man" seeing her alone, came quickly to her side, 

" Will you come on the balcony a minute % " he pleaded in a low 
voice. " Perhaps you don't remember me," he continued softly ; " but 
that doesn't really matter, for at last I have found my old-fashioned 
girl." And Dorothy, looking up, found herself gazing straight into 
those brown eyes. 

CoEINiNA GANT. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



The Preservation of the Forests Treated as an Economic 

Question. 



In treating the preservation. of the forests as an economic question, 
we lay aside all senthnentalism, and consider the forests in their relation 
to the practical side of man's life. By wasting our vast tracts of wood- 
land, we are not only destroying much of the natural beauty of our 
country, but also reducing the supply of a utility the importance of 
which can hardly be over-estimated. 

It is said that next to the earth, the forest is the most useful servant 
of man. However sweeping this statement may seem, when we study 
the various functions of the forests, we can appreciate its truth. And 
what are the benefits derived from the forests? We may answer 
this question by naming, first, the yielding of wood ; second, the partial 
control of rainfall, thereby affecting water-courses and temperature. 

The utilities fashioned from wood are too numerous to mention, and 
the importance of them and of wood as fuel is too apparent to dwell 
upon ; but at least we may ask, What would man do were these utilities 
cut off ? 

If we now take up the question of the control that the forests exert 
upon rainfall, we can readily see that by evaporating and retarding a 
large portion of water the forests prevent disastrous floods. This function 
is important, however, only when the greater part of the drainage basin 
of streams consists of woodland. 

The influence of forests upon climate is of utmost importance. Before 
explaining this statement, we must recall to our minds that the tempera- 
ture is affected by winds and moisture. It is with these two factors 
that forests play their part. " The influence of the forest cover and the 
forest floor appears in the temperature of the air," and scientists have 
proved that they modify extremes of heat and cold. 

In addition to this modification of temperature, forests have a purify- 
ing effect upon the atmosphere. Their air, like that of sea and moun- 
tain, is comparatively pure, and it is said, freer from injurious gases, 
dust particles, and bacteria than is that of the fields' air. Even city 
parks have a hygienic function, as they reduce the temperature, furnish 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



better drainage conditions of the soil, and to some extent, destroy bac- 
teria. 

We can readily see that each of these uses of the forests has a bearing 
upon the economic life of man. Without further considering the im- 
portance of wood as fuel or as material, we may touch upon the retarda- 
tion of rainfall and the modification of climate in relation to the econ- 
omy of mankind. In considering the first of these questions, we shall 
have no difficulty in realizing the importance of the prevention of floods, 
with the attendant destruction of crops, gradual ruin of the soil, or even 
the sweeping away of whole communities. Climate, which we have seen 
to be partially affected by the forests, has a vast influence upon soil con- 
ditions. Moreover, climate may give or deprive man of the health and 
strength necessary to the active seeking of a livelihood. 

Although we have named but a few of the functions of the forests, 
yet they are enough to show the crying need for an intelligent care and 
preservation of the woods of America. The people of the United 
States, however, seem to be beginning to realize the value of Nature's 
gift, and perhaps in the near future they will make a more enthusiastic 
effort to save the forests from ruthless destruction. 

Serena C. Bailey. 

[This paper was not written for publication in the Muse, but m 
course of ordinarv class work. — Editors.] 



Evening Musings. 



With purple tinge on cloudy fringe 

The sun's last ray is dying; 
While gently hlow, with murmurs low, 

The evening zephyrs, sighing. 

The cares of day have flown away; 

We rest with all creation. 
Dear twilight hour, we love thee more, 

Sweet hour of meditation. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Sweet time to think, when on the brink 

Of night, the time of dreaming, 
For then the mind is unconfined, 

And full of fancies teeming. 

Tis evening brings, and round us flings 

Such hallowed visions beaming, 
Plucked from the fold of memory's hold, 

When all her wealth is gleaming. 

Some visions bright, some dark as night, 

Oh let these be the fleetest! 
Bedeck with flowers these golden hours, 

From memory cull the sweetest. 

But why the past; why to the past 

Should now mine eyes be veering, 
Or through the dim and darkened rim 

Of future's glass be peering? 

Why turn away? Is not to-day 

With visions filled entrancing. 
With more of joy without alloy. 

Than all this backward glancing? 

Ah, yes, to-day; away, away 

Kind memory with thy dreaming; 
And fancy free with all thy glee, 

I'll spare thee with thy seeming. 

All 'round I see the air as free, 

The charms of nature smiling; 
Trees, rocks, and flowers, sweet scented bowers, 

Our tender hearts beguiling. 

Yet all of this is shorn of bliss. 

The restless heart is roaming; 
For skies not here, the one most dear, 

To share with me the gloaming. 

J. B. H. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



SCHOOL ACTIVITIES. 



History of the Epsilon Aipha Pi Literary Society. 

Under the direction of Miss Stone, on April 5, 1900, the Epsilon 
Alpha Pi Literary Society was organized. The name of the society was 
taken from the Greek initial letters of one of onr most famous Southern 
poets — Edgar Allan Poe ; the colors adopted were sage and old rose, and 
the flower the Cherokee Rose. 

On March 13, 1902, a law was passed requiring an average of ninety 
per cent on all lessons for a student to be eligible to the society, as if to 
make more forcible the motto, ''Where high thoughts are duty." There 
are about forty active members this year, although the average necessi- 
tates the Epsilon Alpha Pi having a smaller number than the Sigma 
Lambda. 

The meetings are held every second and fourth Wednesday in the 
English room, but we hope to have next year a room in the new Audi- 
torium of the literary societies. 

Every year the two literary societies have an inter-society debate, and 
there are also many other debates among the individual members of the 
societies, their object being to broaden the mind and promote literary 
tastes and interests among the members of the societies. In 1902, 
the E. A. P. Society challenged the Sigma Lambda to an inter-society 
debate, and in this debate the latter won. Again in 1903 the Sigma 
Lambda won. . 

But the tide turned in 1901, and the E. A. P. were victorious. Last 
year the debate was an interesting one, and although the Sigma Lambda 
justly won, "much was to be said for both sides." It is the E. A. P.'s 
time to win, and there is no reason why she should not do so. 

The debate this year will take place in April, the Epsilon Alpha Pi 
being represented by Bettie Woolf, '06, and Lillian Fanner, '07, while 
their Sigma Lambda opponents will be Jane Iredell Green, '06, and 
Margaret Mackay, '06. The subject is, "Resolved, that the enormous 
growth of the modern novel is an educational disadvantage." 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



The Junior Auxiliary. 



The additional Lenten work of the Junior Auxiliary has been taken 
up this year with unusual interest and energy, and the special undertak- 
ings of each chapter are well under way. 

Every chapter has contributed to the new Altar fund. 

Meetings have been held every other Sunday night, when various 
missionary articles have been read, and during Lent, in nearly every 
case, the members meet each Saturday night and sew. 

St, Monica's has contributed toward the Chapel Carpet, Smedes schol- 
arship, and is now working on a box of clothing for St. Margaret's Mis- 
sion at Morganton. 

■ St. Elizabeth's has contributed toward Mrs, Geofl'roy's school at 
Beaufort and has followed Miss Cheshire's suggestion in helping Mr. 
Berkeley in his mission work among the mill people of Mayodan. 

St. Etheldreda's contributes toward two Smedes scholarships and is 
working on a box of clothing for a child at St, Saviour's. 

St. Anne's has given to Mrs. Geoffroy, to the two Smedes scholarships, 
and is preparing a box for a child from St, Saviour's Mission. 

St. Margaret's prepared a box of clothing at Xmas time. 

St. Catherine's gave to a poor colored woman, a former servant in the 
school, and is now working on clothing for a child from St, Saviour's 
Mission. ^- 



SOCIAL LIFE. 



The Washington lea to the Seniors. 



On the afternoon of February 22nd, a Washington Tea was given to 
the Senior Class and the certificate girls by Misses Green, Sullivan, and 
Virginia Bailev. Gowned in costumes of Madame Washington's period, 
the hostesses received in the French room, which was made attractive 
by means of divans covered with cushions and of pennants, flags and 
views decorating the walls. Tacked on the walls were the names of 
many familiar and unfamiliar plants, with the help of which we were 
to complete the interesting though tragic romance of Fair Marigold 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



and Sweet William, a story told — with omissions — in the booklets given 
us. The booklets were themselves charming, with covers fittingly decor- 
ated in hand-painted flowers and bearing the owner's name and the date, 
done in green and gold. We had a merry time, especially delighting 
in the "Snap-dragon poppy" with the "sourgrass" temper, and in the 
fact that his "dogwood" bark every "thyme" the hapless lover endeav- 
ored to serenade Fair Mary. Miss Mary Lassiter completed correctly 
her version of the tale and received as reward a bunch of beautiful crim- 
son carnations, while Miss Nancy Fairley had ample consolation for 
her ill success in a most interesting hatchet with a hollow handle filled 
with cherries. 

Dainty refreshments having been served and enjoyed, we said good- 
bye, agreeing that the flower party with its suggestion of the day had 
been one of the prettiest and pleasantest of entertainments. ■ T. 

Mrs. Andrews' Dinner Party. 



On the twenty-sixth of February, Mrs, A. B. Andrews gave a dinner 
to a party of St. Mary's girls, as has been her custom for several years. 
Mrs. Andrews is an old St. Mary's girl herself, and by the time the 
party sat down to the delightful dinner we felt that we had known her 
all our lives. 

The table was prettily decorated in white carnations and there were 
carnations tied in blue and white ribbons (St, Mary's colors) with 
little calendars at our plates for souvenirs. We had a truly charming 
time. Among those who enjoyed Mrs. Andrews' hospitality were: 
Nancy Fairley, Alice Davis, Mildred Smith, Annie Wood, Margaret 
Eldridge, Mary Shuf ord, Elise Emerson, Emily Garrison, Mary Gwynn, 
Alice Corbett, Margaret. Wilson, Virginia Bailey, Loula Joyner, Bessie 
Watts, Betsie London, Fannie Lee, Louise Gadsden, Mary Bryan, 
Helen Liddell, and Annie Sloan. A. W. S. 



10 The St. Mary's Muse. 



" The Elopement of Ellen." 

One of the cleverest and most taking of the entertainments of the year 
was the last of the Chapter entertainments on the Saturday before Lent, 
when St. Margaret's Chapter presented the three-act comedy, " The 
Elopement of Ellen." 

The actors were quite in the spirit of their parts and each did her 
best, and that best reflected much credit on each one. Too much love- 
making, some thought, but to others that was no objection, and the play 
really isn't any worse than the " Duchess' " novels. 

The cast was as follows : 

Richard Ford (a devoted young husband) L. Hey ward. 

Molly (his wife) Ella Croft. 

Robert Sheppard (Molly's brother) Elise Emerson. 

Max Ten Bych (chum of Robert's) Helen Strange. 

Dorothy March (engaged to Max. A guest of Mrs. Fords) Rowena Lee. 

June Haverhill (Wellesley, '06, who is doing some special 

investigation for economic courses during the summer Sue Prince. 

John Hume (rector of St. Agnes) Emma Barnwell. 

Act. I. Mrs. Ford's Dining-room. 
Act. II. Arbor in Mrs. Ford's Garden. 
Act. III. Same as Act II. 



SCHOOL NOTES. 



— Myrtle Disosway had a short visit to her home in New Bern from 
the 23d of February to the 5th of March. 

— Elizabeth Waddill is rejoicing in a visit from her mother, Mrs. 
E. T. Waddill of Cheraw, S. C, who is visiting friends in town. 

— Julia Winston has had to withdraw from school on account of ill- 
health. We trust she will soon be entirely recovered and return to us. 

— Miss Hull assisted the Third Regiment Band in its concert on 
March 16th, and the same evening Mrs. Irvine played at the reception 
given by the Teachers' Club of Raleigh to the Wake County teachers 
at Peace Institute. The St. Mary's performers had a distinct part in 
the success of both entertainments. 



The St. Mary's Muse. H 



—The party from St, Mary's who attended the recital of Mrs. Jessie 
Townsend Southwick at the Baptist University for Women on Saturday, 
the 17th, were very much delighted at her recital of " Macbeth." 

—Grief has come close home to us and our sympathies have been 
aroused even more than usual this month. Marjorie and Olive Robert- 
son were called to their homes in Columbia on the 24th by the accidental 
death of their younger sister, Elizabeth Sherrod, in Hendersonville ; and 
on the 7th Anna Waugh was summoned home to Buena Vista, Ya., to 
be with her father, who died on Saturday the 10th. They each have 
our love and sympathy. The Robertsons are with us again, but Anna 
will not return. 

—The address of Capt. S. A. Ashe at the Thursday Talk on March 
8th was a treat. It is always a pleasure to listen to Captain Ashe, and 
this occasion was no exception. He carried us back with him to Moore's 
Creek and the early days of Carolina, and interested us in many facts 
in the early history of the State. We are gratified, too, to have in the 
library through the courtesy of the local chapter of the Daughters of the 
Confederacy, several copies of Captain Ashe's oration on General Lee, 
just printed By the Daughters. 



ary's inuse. 



Subscription, One Year. = = = = One Dollar. 

Single Copies, = = = = = Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh 
N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumnse, under the editorial management of the 
Senior Class. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 

Correspondence from friends solicited. ealeigh, n. c. 



Editorial Board. 

Ruth Foster, '06, Editor-in-Chief. Jane Iredell Green, '06, Business Manager. 

Francis E. Woolf, '06. Margaret Mackay, '06. Lillian Farmer, '07. 

Literary Department. 
Mary T. Lassitee, '06. Gertkude Sullivan, '06. 

SPECIAL EDITORS FOR MARCH. 
Lillian Farmer, '06, Chief; Emily Garrison, '07j Louise Hill, '08. 



Editorials. 



Lent, the period of quiet, is also a period of accomplishment. The 
students are getting in their most effective weeks before the warm and 
pleasant spring weather begins to sap the energy, and study is in the air. 
The inter-society debaters are hard at work, putting forth every effort 
to bring triumph to their respective colors ; the several chapters are each 
more or less busy with various forms of Lenten work, most of them giv- 
ing an evening a week to a combined sewing and reading bee; the 
Seniors are beginning to think about their Commencement essays; and 
everyone is beginning to be fully conscious that whatever is to be done 
must be done quickly, for when Easter has arrived, as it will speedily, 
there will be less than six weeks of school ahead. 



The regular editors are still busy with the annual, which is now 
about ready for the printer. They think that the year-book of 1906 is 
going to be more than usually good this year, and we all hope that they 
are right. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 13 



The readers have been much rejoiced at the recent additions to the 
books in the Library. The Library is being gradually improved, but 
there is still much to be done, and the very sight of new books is attrac- 
tive regardless of the contents. 



The Muse, which seems to have much difficulty in keeping up any 
exchange department, since this is the case, would like to again express 
its appreciation of the exchanges which come regularly and so acceptably 
to it ; and would this month say a word in speeal encouragement of the 
high-school publications which have in the past year been added to the 
school publications of the State. We are very glad to welcome the 
High School Enterprise, and trust that it may live long and prosper. 
We appreciate, too, the High School Folio, from Flushing, X. Y., the 
paper of the school where Miss Slater now inspires as she used to inspire 
at St. Marv's. 



INFLUENCES THAT ENCOURAGE LENTEN OBSERVANCE. 



(From the Southern Churchman.) 

There never was a time more favorable for the true observance of Lent than 
this present year. The very atmosphere is charged with the thought of right 
doing, better living, higher aims; and any Church that calls its members to these 
practices and to the reformation of character that precedes them., will have the 
good will of every noble American citizen. 

Furthermore, among all Christian bodies, the conviction is growing that it 
is the spiritual life the Church must foster and Church membership means more 
than in days past, Christian living. Church membership only counts for noth- 
ing to-day among the masses; Christian living has every man's respect. 

Still more, the prejudices regarding "keeping Lent" are rapidly passing 
away. Beginning with emphasizing Holy Week, it will not be many years 
before all Christian bodies will keep Lent with an earnestness that will put to 
shame many a parish. 

Let us seize upon such conditions as an inspiration to observe this Lenten 
season so well in its true purpose that the whole community in which we live 
may understand the power of this time of spiritual refreshing to strengthen and 
purify character by its influence upon our own lives. — Parish Leaflet. 



11 The St. Mary's Muse. 



The Rector's Recent South Carolina Trip. 



Mr. DuBose had the pleasure of a nine-day trip to South Carolina in 
the early part of February, a visit which deserves more than the passing 
mention we were able to give it in the last month's Muse. Leaving 
St. Mary's on Thursday, the 8th, for Columbia, he visited successively 
Orangeburg, Summerville, Charleston, Sumter and Florence, returning 
by way of Fayetteville in time for the Sunday services on the 18th. 

After a series of pleasant visits in Columbia Thursday afternoon in 
the pouring rain, the fair weather which greeted Mr. DuBose on Friday 
in Orangeburg was very cheering, and by the attentive courtesy of the 
Rector of the parish, Rev. Mr. Thomas, he spent the day in another 
series of encouraging calls. On Saturday he was with friends in Sum- 
merville, where there was further opportunity for visits ; and Sunday, 
spent very pleasantly at the home of Mr. Clias. F. Middleton, was 
passed largely in the churches. In the morning he spoke at the Holy 
Communion, at 4 :30 at Grace Church, and at night at St, Michael's, 
meeting hearty welcomes and good congregations at each church. Rain 
on Monday prevented the formation of the St. Mary's Guild, for which 
purpose a meeting had been called at the home of the Misses Ravenel, 
but much interest was shown in the purpose and the Guild has since 
been organized through Rev. Mr. Mikell, one of the South Carolina 
trustees, with seventeen charter members, and as officers: Miss Jennie 
Ravenel, President ; Miss Saida Hanckel, Vice-President ; and Miss 
Mary Sass, Secretary-Treasurer. The first half of the week was de- 
voted to visits to Charleston, all of them pleasant, not the least of these 
being calls at the Memminger School, where Prof. Tait did the honors, 
and at the school of the Misses Sass and the Misses Gibbs. Thurs- 
day he spent in Sumter with more visits and more encouragement; and 
Florence was reached in time for an address at the sendee Thursday 
evening. 

On Friday, through the courtesy of Rev. Mr. Callendar, the Rector, 
who entertained him and gave up the day to him, he made many new 
acquaintances in Florence and renewed many old ones, making an 
address that afternoon at the four-o'clock service. In the evening he 
reached Fayetteville and was most hospitably entertained at the home 



The St. Mary's Muse. 15 



of Mr. Croswell. Saturday morning was very pleasantly and usefully 
spent in visits under the escort of the Rector, Mr. Hughes, and Saturday 
evening found him again at the school. 

The visit was one succession of pleasant experiences, and Mr. DuBose 
looks for much tangible result from it in the future attendance at St. 
Mary's. The South Carolina girls increase in number year by year, 
but the increase can well be even more rapid. 

IN LIGHTER VEIN. 



Bessie Albright, is not "mashed"— she is Chris-talized. 

Helen 8. — "Oh, I'm just dying to see a bull fight." 

French Teacher.— "Why, you could; all the peasant women go." 

Hazel M. to Alice McG. (who has put her books on the radiator).— 
"Why, Alice, your books will get cooked there," 

AH ce . — "All the better; perhaps I can digest them then." 

Mr. Stone.— "Why were the soldiers of the American army called 

Minute Men V 

Isabelle C— "Because they could get ready in a second." 

There was once a little maiden, 

And she took her ink and pen, 
For she had some verse to make, 

And she had to do it then; 
And it happened that verse making 

Wasn't in her line, 
But she had to get it finished 

By a certain time. 
7 iien she thought, and thought, and thought, 

But her thoughts would not come right, 
And she put down anything, 

Just to get it out of sight; 
And now that it is down, 

I wonder if it will do, 

Or if it will be returned, 

With red ink too. 

M. S. 



16 The St. Mary's Muse. 



A Royal K°ad to Knowledge. 



How fine 'twould be if wisdom grew 

On trees as all the apples do. 

Then we could plant our Latin seed 

And pick the translations we need. 

We'd theorems from our papers wipe 

And wait until the proofs were ripe. 

We'd leave our very tiresome bench 

And in the fields find pecks of French. 

If we would master Japanese 

We'd just run out and shake the trees; 

And German then in all the towns 

Would grow with proper verbs and nouns. 

In every person's yard there 'd be 

Large beds of the world's history. 

Why, every man and child would stop 

And wonder at my wisdom crop. 

While I would throw my books away, 

And laugh and play the whole, whole day. 

B. I. 



Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 



St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 

President, - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

f Mrs. M. T. Leak, Durham. 
„ ! Mrs. I. M. Pittenger, Raleigh, 

Vice-Presidents, 1 Mrs F P Tuc b;er, Raleigh, 

|_Mrs.Kate de R. Meares, Wilmington. 
Sec.-Treas., - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 



The Special Alumnae Muse. 



Enough contributions have already been received from alumnae to 
assure the success of the April Alumnae number of the Muse to anyone 
interested in the past of St. Mary's, but we hope before the fifth of April, 
when the paper will go to press, to have a number of other articles, and 
so to be able to make the descriptions more general. 



The Chapel. 



The Chapel claims an extra share of our attention during Lent, and 
this Lent has been marked by several very tangible improvements as 
well as by the spiritual help. 

The new clergy stalls, the gift of the ladies of the St. Mary's Guild 
of the District of Asheville, have just arrived and been put in place. 
They are of oak, solid and handsome, and add greatly to the appearance 
of the chancel, there being seats for three on the left and two on the 

right. 

The handsome memorial window, given by Mrs. W. A. Erwm of 
Durham, in memory of her mother, Mrs, Aldert Smedes, will also be in 
place over the altar by the Feast of the Annunciation, March 25th, the 
most appropriate time since the Annunciation is the subject of the 

window. 

The fund for the memorial Altar grows steadily and quietly, and 
more and more testifies to the love of the alumnae for the godly men 
whose lives of usefulness it is to commemorate. 



18 The St. Mary's Muse. 



ALUMNAE MOTES. 



— We were very glad to have a brief visit from Bessie Poe Law the 
latter part of February. She was enjoying a brief respite from her 
very delightful work teaching at Wilson's Mills. 

— An event of much interest in the latter part of February was the 
wedding on Washington's Birthday of Miss i\nnie Dughi, St. Mary's 
1900, daughter of Mr. A. Dughi of Raleigh, and Mr. Joseph Daniel 
Maag of Baltimore. They will reside in Catonsville, Md. 

— It is a great pleasure to note the steady if very slow recovery of 
Miss Anne Saunders from her very extended spell of sickness. She has 
been ill since the Christmas holidays, and is not yet able to leave her 
room. Her niece, Miss Laura Saunders of Durham, has been and is 
with her. 

— The Woman's Club has recently invited several of the members of 
St. Mary's, teachers and pupils, to assist in its programs to mutual pleas- 
ure. Miss Sanborn sang at the general meeting of the Club on February 
7th, and Marylily Fisher and Serena Bailey played for the Music Sec- 
tion on Friday, March 9th. 

— The alumnae of recent years will be much interested in the recent 
marriage of Miss Elizabeth Willing Massey, '04, and Dr. Raymond 
Dean Thompson of Jasper, Fla. The wedding took place on February 
21 at the home of Professor Massey, the bride's father, in Philadelphia. 
Miss Massey taught in Jasper the year after her graduation, and there 
met Dr. Tompkins, and there in Florida will be her future 'home. 

— The business change made this month by Mr. Chas. Root, who has 
given up the position he has so long and so well filled in the 1ST. G. Home 
Insurance Company to become Cashier of the Raleigh Savings Bank, 
recalls the fact that St. Mary's has a special interest in Mr. Root, aside 
from the family ties which link him to the school through his wife and 
daughters, for in the days of the transition from private to church 
school and in the trying days between the passing of Dr. Smedes and the 
coming of Rector Bratton, Mr. Root's business abilities were of great 
use to St. Mary's, and he gave of himself freely in the interests of the 
school. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 19 



Margaret DuBose has been having a glorious visit in South Caro- 
lina. After going to Columbia for Gussie Jones' wedding and spending 
some time with her uncle, Dr. Theo. DuBose, she visited Mary Ville- 
pigue in Camden, and then visited friends in Ridge Spring. From 
there she returned to Columbia for a visit to the Allan Joneses, and 
will conclude her trip with a few days at Winthrop with Sadie Jenkins. 
She will be home by Easter. 

—Many friends at St. Mary's as well as the host of them in the city 
are greatly distressed at the critical illness of Dr. P. E. Mines, so long 
the physician to the school. Dr. Hines, who had been constantly at 
the school in attendance on Miss Saunders, was paralyzed on February 
27th, and has since been in a critical condition at his home, where he 
now seems to be slowly recovering. Dr. Hines is now past seventy-nine 
in years and his term of service to the school has been continuous since 
the death of Dr. Chas. Johnson. 

Duxedin, Fla., March 4, 1906. 
Dear Editors:— I see by the Muse, which came to-day that you are still hav- 
ing trouble getting news items from the alumnae. 

I am going to try and do my part in the future, although I haven't very 
much of interest to tell. Kitty Coleman, '04, of Macon, spent the last two weeks 
of January and the first two of February with me, and I believe enjoyed her 
visit as much as we did. 

Elmer George came the last two weeks of Kitty's stay and I hope to have her 
with me until the middle or last of April. Wednesday of this week we are going 
to take a cruise down the coast in company with my father and two friends, 
Miss Whitfield, of Dunedin, and Miss Malone, of Indiana. We will go in two 
small sail boats; sailing the greater part of the day and pitching our tents and 
camping on the beach at night. 

I suppose these bare facts are all you want to know, and there is no need to 
add that we are having a glorious time, enjoying the beautiful weather, oranges 
and grape fruit, which grow right in our yard, and the sailing on the bay and 
gulf and picknicking on the tropical islands. Elmer joins me in best wishes. 
Yours sincerely, I SABEL Brumby, '04. 

[The Editors tender sincere thanks to Miss Brumby.] 



20 The St. -Mary's Muse. 



Afternoon Study Hall 



Every evening at half-past four 
The bad girls come in the school-room door; 
They take their seats with a care-worn air, 
Trying to feel that they don't care. 

After the roll is slowly called 

And "present" by each is loudly bawled, 

Each one is given a task to do 

Which will take at least an hour or two. 

Groans are heard on every side, 

But by the rules they quiet abide, 

And repent the hours they'd idly spent, 

While longing looks at the clock are sent. 

Then when five-thirty comes around at last, 

Books and pencils in desk are cast 

'Mid hasty vows that are surely meant 

To study-hall ne'er again to be sent. C. Gant. 



Tempore Mutantur. 



In the days of Greece's beauty 

And the days of Roman power, 
The Muses, nine, were prayed to 

Almost every single hour. 

If a man would write a history, 

Play a tune, or buy some shoes, 
He'd always start by calling on 

His special patron Muse. 

Those good old days are past and gone, 

Yet in this age of knowledge 
We still retain from the dim past 

One MrsE — in this, our college. 

Our Mtse is not a goddess fair, 

Nor is it in such great demand; 
But it uses up all the minutes spare, 

And all the brains you have on hand. 

0! the days of Greece were glorious! 

And the Roman power was fine; 
But think for one second how awful, 

If instead of one Muse, we had nine! M. DrB. 



READ !— MARK, '.—ACT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



Established 1858 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 

RALEIGH, • NORTH CAROLINA 



HAVE 



WHARTON 

TO MAKE YOUR 

PHUTOGHAPHS 

REMEMBER IT PAYS TO GET THE BEST 



A SUPPOSITION. 



'Suppose," said the wise orator— "tho' 'tis a thought stupendous- 
'Suppose a baby one year old, with arms of the tremendous 
Length of ninety-three-odd million miles, 
Should in a streak of fun, 
Reach up and touch the sun — 

That child would be 
233 
Years old 
I'm told 
Before it learned 
It's hand was burned. 



THE DOBBIN-FERRALL GO, 



Dry Goods 

OF ALL KINDS 




...Send to... 



Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

LADIES ELVE SHOES SSB SLIPPERS 



ALFRED WILLIAMS & GO. 

RALEIGH. N.C. 

BOOKS 

OF ALL KINDS 

SELECT LINE OF STATIONERY. 

Eastman's Kodaks and supplies. 
Office supplies. 



Advertisements. 



Hart-Ward Hardware Company 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Best of everything in Hardware. Satisfaction 

guaranteed or money refunded. All-right 

Cook Stoves, Celebrated Warm Air 

Heaters, the only perfect heater 

made. Write for prices. 

DARNELL & THOMAS, 
Pianos and Organs. 
Sheet music and small goods. 
Raleigh, N. C. 



KING'S GROCERY, 
"The Little Store." 



f . C. STRONACH'S SOUS CO. 



GROCERS 



216 FAYETTEVILLE STREET 

KING'S UP-TO-DATE DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN. 
Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets. 

You'll find up-to-date Shoes at 

HUNTER BROS. & BREWER 



WHAT'S IN A NAME? 



Names are nothing, my dear, my dear, 

Oh, names are nothing, the bards declare; 
The rose if known as a snidge would spread 

Its fragrance far on the ambient air, 
And money would still our wants fulfill 

If we called it grifSe or named it snace, 
And the swan if known as a doodlesnock 

Would always gladden us with her grace. 



THE BOYLAN-PEARGE GO. 



Dry Goods, Millinery, 
Tailored Costumes, 
Gloves, Hosiery, 
Handkerchiefs, 
Fancy Goods, 
Underwear, 



Mail orders filled intelligently and promptly. 

FAYETTEVILLE AND SALISBURY STS. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



.ROSENTHAL 
HO. 

GROCERS 

136 FAYETTEVILLE STREET 



Advertisements. 



SALVATORE DESIO, 

Manufacturing Jeweler and Silversmith. 

1012 F. St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

On application will send any articlt, selected. 
To St. Mai-y's, discount of ten per cent. 



J. S. MacDONALD & CO., Jewelers. 

Diamonds, Watches, Clocks, Silverware, 

Jewelry, Class Rings, Medals and 

Badges to order. 

217 N. Charles St. Baltimore, Md. 



"WE WANT your patronage in everything in 
the Jewelry, Watch and Diamond line. We 
sell only the best goods and at most reason- 
able prices. We make all kinds of college, 
class and fraternity Jewelry. Our new cata- 
logue mailed FREE to any address. 

H. SlLVEETHOEN CO., 

917 Main St., Lynchburg, Va. 



ELLINGTON'S ART STORE, 
Raleigh, N. C. 
Everything in Art. 
Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs. 

For the most satisfactory work, 

Try RIGGSBEE at 
Watson & Co.'s Gallery. PHOTOGRAPHS. 

T. W. BLAKE, 

Rich Jewelry and Silverware. 

Repairing prom pi ly done. 

JOLLY & WYNNE JEWELRY COMPANY, 
Wedding and Holiday presents. 
Fine Watch and Jewelry repairing. 



Names are nothing, my dear, my dear; 

Would the day be dark if we named it night? 
The love that lies in a maiden's eyes 

Would still be love, though we called it spite. 
There's naught in the names that men invent; 

Call the rose a snidge and 'twill still be fair, 
But think of electing a President 

Who bore the name of Robin Adair. 

— Chicago Record-Herald. 



RESTAURANT AND ICE CREAM PARLOR. 

Confections, Foreign and Domestic Fruits. 

CATERER. 

St. Mary's folks know and approve of Dughi. 



Good things alwa ys at retsch , sbakery 
Buy ROYSTER'S Fine Candies. 



Private Dining and Banquet Halls at 

GIERSCH'S. 216 Fayetteville St. 



CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

AT J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 

Leading Florists of North Carolina. 
Raleigh, N. C. 

H. STEINMETZ, 

FLORIST. 
Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns and all kinds 
Raleigh.] of Plants. [Phone 113 . 

Drugs and Perfumes, 

Toilet Articles, etc. 

JNO. P. HAYES, Photographer. 

Kodak work of all kinds. 



ANTICEPHALALG1NE cures quickly and 
safely Headache in all its forms. 



ROBT. SIMPSON, 



Advertisements. 



FOR QUICK COOKING 
nothing exceeds the 

GAS RANGE 

ALWAYS READY. NO DIRT OR ASHES 

FOR LIGHT 

Usethe best: THE WELSBACH LIGHT 

STANDARD GAS AND ELECTRIC CO. 

124 Fayetteville St. 



YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 
121 Fayetteville Street. 

J. SCHWARTZ, 

RICHMOND MARKET. 

Meats of All Kinds. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



THE SOUTHERN EDUCATIONAL BUREAU, 

RALEIGH, N, C. 

(Established, 1891.) 

Invites correspondence with Teachers and 
Schools. 

FULL INFORMATION FREE. 

CHARLES W. BARRETT— Architect 

Special Work in Fine Colonial Architecture. 

Author of 

"Colonial. Southern Homes." 

115% Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 

PENN MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. 
R. B. RANEY, General Agent, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



GRIMES & VASS, 

Fire Insurance and Investments. 

Raleigh, N. C 

HELLER'S SHOE STORE. 

GYMNASIUM SHOES. 

RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK. ' 

Capital $15,000 Surplus $25,000. Deposits over 
$600,000. Four percent interest paid on deposits. 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON, 

COAL, WOOD AND ICE. 

122 Fayetteville St Raleigh, N. 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

ADMITS WOMEN 

TO THE HIGHER CLASSES. 

Many valuable courses are offered by a large 
and efficient corps of instructors. 

Graduates of St. Mary's who wish to carry 
their studies further will do well to write for 
catalogue and information. 

Francis P. Venable, President, 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 

E. M. UZZELL & CO., 

PRINTERS AND BINDERS, 

ONLY HIGH GRADE WORK. 
RALEIGH, N. C. 

INSURE AGAINST LOSS BY FIRE. 

Best Companies Represented. 

Bonding Solicited 

THE MECHANICS DIME SAVINGS BANK 

Raleigh, N. C. 

OAK CITY STEAM LAUNDRY. 

Promptness and Neatness with all work. 

Marshall & West, Props. 

POWELL & POWELL, 
COAL AND WOOD, 

107 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 






Advertisements. 



The National Bank, of Raleigh, 

RALEIGH, 1ST. C. 

Capital $225,000. Surplus and Profits $115,000. 

Chas. H. Belvin, President. 

Chas. E. Johnson, Vice-President. 

F. H. Bkiggs, Cashier. 

J. B. Tihberlake, Teller and Ass't Cashier. 

Safe Deposit Boxes in Fire and Burglar Proof 
Vault for rent at moderate cost. Absolutely 
safe place for keeping valuables of all kinds. 



THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C .— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

If its furnishing the Home, Office, School or 

Hall, see us. 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 

Cor. Wilmington and Hargett Streets, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

HICKS' DRUG STORE 
For Toilet Requisites and Cold Df.inks. 



All Phones. 



W. B. MANN, 

Groceries. 11 E. Hargett St. 



PESCUD'S PHARMACY, 
12 West Hargett St., Raleigh, N. C. 

WEATHERS & PERRY, 

Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 

117 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 

Don't forget to buyyour Shoes of 

S. C. POOLE'S Shoe Store. 

PERRY & ROSENTHAL, Trust Bldg. 
Ladies' Fine Shoes. 

Dr. V. E. TURNER, 
Dentist. 

J. R. FERRALL & CO.— GROCERS. 
Best of everything in our line. 
22 Fayetteville Street. 

JOHN C. DREWRY. 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE.' 



The Citizens National Bank 

RALEIGH, N. C. 
Capital, - - S 100,000.00 
Surplus, - - 100,000.00 

Deposits, - 1,000,000.00 

Personal Calls and Correspondence Invited 

J. G. Brown, Pres. H. E. Litchford, Cashier 

Our ECCLESIASTICAL ART Department is 
superbly equipped for the prompt and proper 
execution of fine church work such as Altars, 
Pulpits, Lecturns, Prayer Desks, Litany 
Desks, Rood Screens, Fonts, and similar 
furnishings. Write for special church fur- 
niture catalogue. 

HANN-WANGERIN-WEICKHARDT CO., 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

THE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY, 

Holiday Goods. 

GEOTMARSFI~& CO., 
Wholesale groceries. Produce, Fruit, 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



ELLINGTON LUMBER COMPaNY, 
All Sorts of Building Supplies, 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



Wrink 



rCOFFEE 

^BESTGROCERS) 



Dr. RUSSELL G. SHERRILL, 

Dentist. 



We make your shopping with us "pleasant 
as well as "profitable." 

A. B. STRONACH COMPANY. 

Outfitters for Ladies, Misses and Children. 
Commencement Dress Materials and Acces- 
sories—Gloves, Fans, Hosiery, Shoes,— receive 
our special attention. 

215 Fayetteville Street. 

STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES. 
Fruits, Vegetables and Country Pro- 
duce. The best of everything and at rock 
bottom prices. Special prices to schools and 
colleges D T. JOHNSON & SONS 

PhoneTS 163 Hargett St 

MISSES REESE & COMPANY, 

Millinery. 



Advertisements. 



SCHOOL PROGRAM. 



March-April, 1906. 

February 28 to April 14: Lent and Lenten Quiet. 

Services as announced in February. 

March 8. Thursday Talk: Capt. S. A. Ashe on "Moore's Creek." 

22. Thursday Talk: Mr. Reimer, A. & M. College, on "Trees, Their Care 

and Growth." 
24. Saturday Evening, 8 p. m.: Lecture: Prof. J. B. Carlyle, of "Wake 
Forest College, on "Horace, the Man and the Poet." 

April 5. Thursday Talk: Prof. H. H. Hume, State Horticulturist, on "Land- 
scape Gardening." 

7. Lecture. 

9. Palm Sunday: Confirmation by Bishop Cheshire at 11:00. 

9-14. Holy Week. Special services daily. 

13. Good Friday. Holy day. 

15. - Easter Day : Services, 7 : 30-11 : 00-5 : 00. 

16. Easter Monday. 

21. Saturday Evening, 8:15.. Lecture: President W. L. Poteat, of Wake 
Forest College. 



SBABOARD 

AIR LINE RAILWAY 

PASSENGER DEPARTMENT 
Direct Line to All Points in the South, South-West, North and North-West . 

DOUBLE DAILY SERVICE BETWEEN Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, 
Washington, Norfolk, Richmond, Raleigh, Charlotte, Wilmington, Atlanta, 
Birmingham, Memphis, Chattanooga, Nashville, Montgomery, Mobile, New 
Orleans, Columbia, Savannah, Jacksonville, Tampa, and all Florida points. 

Two trains every day between New York, Washington, Norfolk-Portsmouth, and Atlanta, 
Birmingham, Memphis, Savannah and Jacksonville. Trains composed of Vestibule Day 
Coaches, Pullman Drawing Room Sleeping Cars, and the latest Cafe Dining Cars. Direct con- 
nections at Memphis and New Orleans for all points in Texas, California, Arkansas, Colorado 
and all Western points. Interchangeable Mileage Books good over 15,000 miles of road on 

For time-tables, winter or summer booklets illustrative of the South and South-West, apply 
to Seaboard Passenger Representatives, or address 

C. H. GATTIS, C B. RYAN, EDWARD P. COST, 

Traveling Passenger Agent, General Passenger Agent, Second Vice-President, 

Raleigh, Iff. C. Portsmouth, Va. Portsmouth, Va. 



atimi Central for -tKeVarolinas. 




Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 



St. Mary's School 



RALELGH, N. C. 



(■fo-r girls qqid young looriien). 



J AL SESSION: -v BEGAN SEPTEMBER 21, 190* 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TEEMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 25, 1906. 



Mary's 



2tion in these 
tm&nt&r- 



1. THE COLLEGE. 

2. TLIE MUSIC SCHOOL^ 

3. TEE BUSINESS' SCHOOL. 
I THE ART SCHOOL. 

5. THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 



are enrolled 225 students from 13 Dioceses, ■ E 

ni^H|BH^&|i Faculty, 




Pianos. /Vetv Miller Grand Piano Just Added, 
ittention to the Social and Christian Side of Education without alight 

ilogae and other information address 2p|!^-^fe ;-'-^^^tP 

Rev. McNeely Dv.Rose, B. S, B. D. 

^H^^^^^l RECTOR. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

ALUMNAE NUMBER. 



Vol. X. April, 1906. No. 9. 



The 1906 Alumnae Edition, 



A picture of the school-girl life of St. Mary's from the opening of the school in 
May, 1842, to the year 1894, in the closing days of the administration of Dr. 
Bennett Smedes. 



CONTENTS. 
"Alma Mater" The School Song H. E. Hodgson. 

ST. MARY'S BEFORE THE WAR. 

The "First Day" of the School Annie Haywood Ruffin. 

My Impressions, 1853-1858 Lucy Moore Capehart. 

A Retrospect Mar V McKinlay Nash. 

IN THE WAR DAYS. 

Notes of the Oldest Inhabitant Kate McKimmon. 

Recollections Lucy Walke Cruikshank. 

IN RECONSTRUCTION TIMES. 

"Smedesborough" Nettie Jackson Mason. 

THE '80's. 

St. Mary's of a By-gone Day Emilie Watts McVea. 

"To Miss Katie"... E - w - McYea. 

IN THE '90's. 

When "McKimmonsville" Flourished i Jessie Degm. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Subscription. One Year. = = = = One Dollar. 

Single Copies, = = = = = Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh 
N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumnae, under the editorial management of the 
Senior Class. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 

Correspondence from friends solicited. raleigh, n. c. 



Editorial. 



The Editors of The Muse in this sixty-fourth year of St, Mary's con- 
sider it a high privilege as well as a great pleasure to be able to present 
to the daughters of St. Mary's of all ages this issue of the little school 
paper, containing as it does the expressions of love and devotion to their 
Alma Mater of a few representative " St. Mary's girls." 

There are few St. Mary's girls who have enjoyed happy school days in 
the old grove but to whom one or more of these pen-pictures will recall 
vividly certain very familiar scenes of the past, while we feel that there 
is no loyal daughter of St. Mary's who will not have real pleasure in 
reading and thinking of those who, if not known to her in actual person, 
must be very familiar to her on the lips and in the life of her friends. 

We would thank the friends, our "older sisters," who have made this 
number of The Muse possible, not only for the articles and the unfail- 
ing interest the writers have shown in their Dear School Mother, de- 
spite the lapse of years and the separation of space, but for the inspira- 
tion which these recollections must give to the girls of the present on the 
lives of whom the future service of St. Mary's depends. 



In these sketches, though the writers have necessarily been obliged to 
be brief, we believe that the student life of St. Mary's is traced almost 
continuously during the period covered, except for one important omis- 
sion, which the editors deeply regret. The early years of the adminis- 
tration of Dr. Bennett Smedes, including the period of Mrs. Kate deiR.. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Meares' lady-principalship, an important time in the life of the school 
(1878-'82 are not touched upon. We are sorry that the alumna? who 
were expected to write of these years were not able to do so at this time, 
but we hope later to be able to complete the sketch with an account of 
that period. 

While this issue of The Muse is dedicated and devoted solely to the 
past, to the founders and builders of the school, and to the hosts of her 
faithful alumna?, and is intended merely to give a fragmentary history 
of the school-girl life from the days "before the war" down to the close 
of the administration of Dr. Bennett Smedes, and the development of 
St Mary's into the Diocesan as well as the Church school in 1897, it 
is both pleasant and appropriate here to refer to two events of the present 
in the life of the Chapel, linking as they do the present and the past, ^ 

On Sunday, March 25, the Feast of the Annunciation, the beautiful 
new memorial window over the altar in the Chapel was dedicated in a 
simple and appropriate service. The window, of chaste design and deli- 
cate coloring, shows the Angel at the Annunciation, while in one of the 
side panels is the "cross and crown," and in the other the "open Bible.^ 
"To the glory of God and in loving memory of Sarah Lyell Smedes," 
the window is the gift of Mrs. W. A. Erwin ("Sadie Smede/') of Dur- 

ham. . . 

And two days before the Annunciation, March 23, the anniversary oi 
the birth of Mrs. Aldert Smedes, the fund for the Memorial Altar was 
completed as a birthday gift of Mrs. M. T. Leak ("Bessie Smedes") 
to her mother; and the new altar, the loving gift of the alumna? to the 
memory of the Rev. Aldert Smedes and the Rev. Bennett Smedes will 
be in place for the 1906 Commencement. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Alma Mater. 



St. Mary's ! wherever thy daughters may be, 

They love thy high praises to sing. 
And tell of thy beauties of campus and tree 

Around which sweet memories cling. 
They may wander afar, out of reach of thy name : 

Afar, out of sight of thy grove, 
But the thought of St. Mary's aye kindles a flame 

Of sweet recollections and love. 

Beloved St. Mary's ! how great is our debt ! 

Thou hast cared for thy daughters full well ; 
They can never thy happy instructions forget, 

ISTor fail of thy virtues to tell. 
The love that they feel is a heritage pure ; 

An experience wholesome and sweet. 
Through fast rolling years it will grow and endure ; 

Be a lamp and a guide to their feet. 

May the future unite all the good of thy past 

With the best that new knowledge can bring. 
Ever onward and upward thy course ! To the last 

Be thou steadfast in every good thing. 
Generations to come may thy fair daughters still 

Fondly think on thy halls and thy grove 
And carry thy teachings — o'er woodland and hill — 

Of earnestness, wisdom, and love. H. E. H. 

[Written in 1905 for The Muse by Mr. H. E. Hodgson, for twenty-five years the 
friend of St. Mary's girls.] 

Sung to the tune of "Believe me if all those endearing young charms." 



Rev. ALDERT SMEDES, D. D., 1810-1877. 
Founder and First Rector of St. Mary's, 1812-1877. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



The "First Day of School."— May, 1842 



BY "'ANNIE HAYWOOD" (MRS. SAMUEL RUFFIN, OF RALEIGH), ONE OF "THE ORIGINAL 

THIRTEEN." 



It was a bright day in May, the Monday of Whitsun Week, 1842, that 
with his final arrangements made, and with his corps of teachers on hand 
ready for the work about to begin, Dr. Aldert Smedes without formality 
and in a very simple way threw open St. Mary's for the first day of 
school. Perhaps with prophetic instinct he could see ahead and antici- 
pate in spirit the success of the work he was about to begin, and so felt 
especially spurred on to begin the labor of love, with all its vicissitudes 
and trials, to which he was to give his life, but more probably with the 
simple faith of an earnest man he was content to go step by step, doing 
his best year by year and trusting to his Guide for results. 

Well do I remember the figures in that first day and in those first 
weeks, but the details of the scenes have faded from memory. There 
was no Chapel at the time, and so the opening service was held in the 
parlor. There the teachers had gathered : Miss Maria Thompson, 
Miss Long, Madame Clement, and as music teachers, Mr. and Mrs. 
Brandt. And here in those early days the first little band of girls gath- 
ered, more than "thirteen" when the day-scholars were counted, but 
always handed down to other generations of St. Mary's girls as the 
"original thirteen." Among the number, I recall Cora Manly, Mar- 
garet Dudley, Kate Badger, Eleanor Williams, Adriana Tucker, Mary 
Guion, Sarah Saunders, Madeline Saunders, Elizabeth G. Haywood, 
Jane F. Haywood, Annie Haywood, Sallie Badger, Olivia Daniel, Mary 
Long Daniel, Lucy Williams, Laura Washington, Harriet Bcrden, Liz- 
zie Davis, Martha Hinton, and Kate Hanrahan. 

After a little the room on the first floor of the East Bock House was 
fitted up as the Chapel and there service was held each morning and 
there in the evening we were dismissed with prayers. The room oppo- 
site the parlor, the present school-room, was used as a recreation room 
for our games, etc. 

One other fact of those early days I want to state. There have been 
many questions asked about Hart's painting which has hung so long in 
2 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



the parlor, portraying Bishop Ives in the confirmation service. There 
have been many guesses as to the identity of the girls in the picture. I 
recall them all distinctly: Laura Washington, with the Bishop's hands 
upon her head ; Eugenia Hinton of the* long curls ; Sarah Crawford. 
They are gone now, but their likenesses will doubtless be familiar to 
St. Mary's girls for many years to come, and so long as the painting 
hangs there on the wall it will serve to remind all who know its history 
of the "first day of school." 

My Impressions, !853-'58. 



BY "LUCY CATHARINE MOORE" (MRS. B. A. CAPEHART, OF RALEIGH) 



My Dear Girls : — When driving past St, Mary's a few days ago I 
directed my coachman to enter the grounds so I could get a view of the 
recent extensions to the Chapel which brought to my memory the old 
Chapel which was on the ground floor of the East Rock building. Every 
morning our beloved Rector, Dr. Aldert Smedes, gathered us there for 
prayer and instruction, giving on certain days a lecture of which we 
were to write an abstract. Oh, how we dreaded those "Abstracts !" How 
difficult it was at first, and how apprehensively we glanced within our 
returned books to look for corrections and see if we had received v.w., 
v.v.w., or v.v.v.w., the latter the highest mark of excellence. Although 
mv father lived in the city, the long walk and my delicate health caused 
him to board me at St. Mary's, therefore I was confirmed in this Chapel. 
Dr. Smedes' tall, graceful figure swinging his cane as he walked, and 
his peculiarly sweet smile on meeting you will never be forgotten. We 
wore a uniform of blue on Sunday or whenever on the street, and if we 
failed to don it, were cited to appear in the "Study" to give our reason 
for violating this ordinance. I entered the school in 1853 and remained 
until 1858. After Dr. Smedes, the ruling spirit at that time was Miss 
Evertson, a teacher whom most of the girls feared. It was rumored 
the Doctor also stood a little in awe of her ! She was very strict, some- 
times sarcastic, but always just, I loved her above all others, and took 
great delight in placing my fresh ^Harper" on the table before study 
hour, hoping to relieve the monotony of that hour to one who was feeble 



The St. Mary's Muse. T 

and suffered much from a weak heart, Grizelle Jacocks was her favor- 
ite; I remember gazing at her with great surprise one day when she 
seated herself upon Miss Evertsons knee while we were gathered around 
the stove in recess — a liberty no one else dared or wished to take. I 
know not if it is the custom now for school girls to have sweethearts 
among their own sex, but it was in those days ; such devotion you cannot 
imagine, unless you felt or were a witness of it. Every delicacy pos- 
sessed was reserved for the adored one ; she was waited upon as we by 
our slaves ; no exertion was too great in her behalf. I remember one 
case where the tables were turned by some tale-bearer who overheard 
slighting remarks made by the loved one. Then the once "beautiful 
one's" every perfection was changed to imperfection and the intimate 
relationship dissolved as the morning dew. My sweetheart was Ellen 
Brent Pearson ; to get a smile or glance from her was the height of my 
ambition and made me supremely happy. She was at that time engaged 
to her future husband, Governor Fowle, who was permitted by Dr. 
Smedes to visit her occasionally ; I never knew a more earnest, devoted 
Christian and faithful student. Judge Badger's daughter Annie, and 
Delia Haywood were among my most intimate friends ; the former, one 
of the most beautiful beings in form and character I ever knew, has 
gone to rest. The latter is now living among the inmates of St. Luke's 
Home, reading and writing for the blind and helpless, going on many 
little errands of kindness, endearing herself to all and laying up a crown 
of glory beyond the gates. Our May Day festival when Sadie Wells, 
of Alabama, was Queen of the May, comes forcibly to my mind ; Carrie 
Han.irhton, Kate Myrover and others were on the stage — 'Sadie although 
not beautiful was so amiable, graceful and lovable she easily won the 
vote for queen. ISTorth Carolina girls who do not matriculate at St. 
Mary's know not what they miss in after life. On a visit to Mississippi 
in IS 60 I met many girls from St, Mary's. We had a feeling of com- 
radeship which nothing else can give, and one of my greatest pleasures 
through life has been those reunions. 

Wherever they are found a little church has sprung up, preceded by 
a Sunday school, and always surrounded by a little coterie of refinement 
and cultivation. Many other little items I might remember, but I will 
take pity on the Muse and refrain from writing any more at present. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



A Retrospect. 



BY "MARY MCKINLAY" (MBS. M. MCK. NASH, NEW BERNE, N. C.). 



In consenting to contribute to the April number of St. Mary's Mttse 
some of my recollections of the school, I have done so with considerable 
hesitation — so long a time having elapsed since I was a pupil there. 
Many of life's vicissitudes have come to me in the course of events, but 
none have served to extinguish nor even dim my affection for the place 
or for the friends known and loved there. 

I was a girl of about 13 years of age when I first went to St. Mary's. 
The journey in those days was by the old-fashioned stage coach — not 
by steam as at present — and I remember that I whiled away the tedious 
hours with the "Pickwick Papers" on the way. I was well grown for 
my years, but as I found afterwards hardly old enough to stand the 
separation from my home and friends, and consequently was often . in 
tears from home-sickness. This wore away, however, when I became 
familiar with my surroundings, and I soon became reconciled to the 
situation and much attached to my teachers and school-mates. 

Conspicuous among the former were Madame Clement, teacher of 
French, in whose dormitory I was placed, the Misses Kissam, Miss 
Evertson, Miss Walker, Mr. Dorat, the art teacher, Mr. Solomons, 
teacher of music — succeeded later by Mr. Mendelssohn and Miss 
Schmidt — Miss O'Connor or "Miss Prank," as the girls called her, and 
Miss Emily Hanley, a beautiful singer and performer on the harp. I 
shall never forget the impression produced on me by "The Blue Bells of 
Scotland" played by her on the harp. There are many others who stand 
out boldly in my memory, but chief among them all was Madame Gouye, 
successor to Madame Clement as teacher of French, a lady of culture 
and refinement and a most successful teacher. Her friendship was 
one of the greatest of my privileges of St. Mary's, and to her I am in- 
debted for most of my knowledge of French. 

And what shall I say of my school-mates, the many happy, bright 
faces that surrounded me, with all of whom my relations were most 
cordial and pleasant — 'how they come trooping before me to-day, taking 
me back to those happy days when the world was all before us. Alas ! 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



that time should play havoc among them. Possibly many have gone 
into the "Silent Land," but of all I retain the most affectionate recol- 
lections. 

Should these lines be read by any who with me remember those days 
they will enter fully into this retrospect, and perhaps love to recall it 
and its associations. 

I feel that no written words about St. Mary's and its past can be com- 
plete without reference to dear Dr. Aldert Smedes, its founder, its hon- 
ored head and our daily source of inspiration — our guide, our teacher, 
our friend, whose faithful service impressed itself upon all who came 
in contact with him, and is still a blessed memory to all whose privilege 
it was to know him. 

This tribute, though brief and imperfect, is from one of St, Mary's 
daughters of the olden time. 



Land of the South. 



Land of the South! — imperial land ! — 

How proud thy mountains rise ! — 
How sweet thy scenes on every hand ! 

How fair thy covering skies ! 
But not for this, — oh, not for these, 

I love thy fields to roam, — 
Thou hast a dearer spell to me, — 

Thou art my native home ! 

***** A. B. Meek. 



10 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Some Notes of Happenings at St. Mary's During Her School 
Days, by the Oldest Inhabitant. 

BY "MISS KATIE" (MISS KATE MCKIMMON, ST. MARY'S) ; PUPIL OF ST. MARY'S 1861-6; 

TEACHER 1868 PRESENT. 



My recollections of St. Mary's date from the time when as a child of 
ten I played and dined with Bessie and Annie Smedes in the children's 
dining room where "Peyster" reigned. Dr. Aldert Smedes was a fre- 
quent visitor at my father's house as were many of the faculty of St. 
Mary's— "Miss O'Connor," "Madame Gouye" and "Mrs. Cuddy" being 
well known at home by me before I came to school. 

I knew St, Mary's as a student throughout the trying days of the War 
between the States and can add my testimony to Dr. Aldert Smedes' 
untiring efforts to aid girls to obtain an education and to shelter many 
deprived by the fortunes of war of their homes. (Among these last were 
the wife and four children of our beloved President, Jefferson Davis, 
who during the summer of '63, I think, were domiciled in the East Rock 
building.) St. Mary's proud record of that time is that her doors were 
never closed tho' at one time "the grove" was filled with tents of the 
opposing army. 

Tho' much interested in "The War" my class-mates and I were too 
young to realize any of the horrors of it. 

We wore homespun dresses and ate and enjoyed "sorghum" (especi- 
ally at candy stews). We helped on Saturdays the ladies who made 
garments for the boys of "The Ellis Light Artillery" and afterwards 
knit socks for some of these boys. We often played "soldier" up and 
down Hillsboro street on our way to and from school, when we walked, 
but as Peggy Mordecai, one of "our crowd," was the proud possessor of 
a carriage, horse and driver — thanks to Peggie's kindness, we frequently 
rode. 

Merry times we had when on our way down Hillsboro St. "G-abe" 
would allow no vehicle to pass us, while the inmates of the carriage 
(sometimes as many as nine) had all they could do to hold each other 
in. These rides were the more appreciated because we came to school 
through July and August. During these months we had "intermission" 



The St. Mary's Muse. 11 



one hour, studied an hour, and then had recitations until 5 o'clock. 
Sometimes we were "kept in." On these rare ( ?) occasions, were it in 
winter, we would have the pleasure sometimes of going home in the 
moonlight. What does a twentieth century girl think of this ? Eating 
dinner "(not lunch) was a great event with us. Our dinner would be 
sent to us at one o'clock by piccaninies who also had the care of our 
books to and from school. We were allowed the use of one of the "base- 
ment" rooms where our daily spread was much enjoyed. During "inter- 
mission," after dinner, we played foot-ball, prisoner's base and other 
active games. 

In those clays "the parlor was held sacred next to the Chapel, and as 
the day scholars never entered it we knew nothing of the midday dance 
now so much enjoyed by all the pupils. We had no examinations, no 
graduating, no diplomas. Yet the women who used diligently and con- 
scientiously the advantages offered by St. Mary's went forth well equip- 
ped for the duties of life. 

Coming after the war to St. Mary's as a boarder, my recollections 
of my life here then are of the pleasantest. Dr. and Mrs. Smedes made 
the school a home for the girls, and the friendships formed then have 
proved among the strongest in my life. There were no "rooms" then, 
but the dormitory life seems to an "old girl" delightful. My lot was 

cast first in Mrs. Iredell's, then in Miss Aries' dormitory. I feel to-day 

the influence of personal intercourse with them. 

The missionary work of the school, now carried on by branches of the 

Woman's and Junior Auxiliary, was first done by "The Missionary 

Society." 

The "Aldert Smedes" scholarship in the Emma Jones School in 

Shanghai, still supported by the school, was the first definite work taken 

up by the society. 

The Sundays at St. Mary's stand out in my memory as delightful 

days. We had morning and evening prayers in the parlor, two services 

in the Chapel where Dr. Aldert and Mr. Bennett Smedes ministered. 

Miss Stella and the "little" organ were there and we loved those 

services. 

Were there ever girls more blessed than we ? 



12 The St. Maky's Muse. 



A pew Recollections, 1863-'64. 



BY " lucy walke" (mrs. thos. c. ceuikshank, "bloomingdale," cecilton, md.) 



Perhaps if I had known when I left St. Mary's that after forty years 
of complete separation from those familiar scenes of my school life and 
the friends of those days, I should again be brought in touch with the 
old place and asked to write some reminiscences of my school-girl life, 
I should have taken more care to preserve the recollections which time 
and its many changes have well-nigh obliterated. 

Dr. Aldert Smedes was then principal, tall, active and full of life. 
He seemed to assume that each girl would do her best, and as I remember 
was grieved rather than angry when disappointed in them. He was a 
man of many sorrows, but he was always cheerful and thoroughly in 
earnest. In the Chapel, where three times a week after the morning 
service he delivered a short lecture, I especially felt his impress. After 
we were dismissed we went at once to the school room and wrote ab- 
stracts of this lecture. To his classes, too, he brought an undivided 
attention which was in itself an inspiration to his pupils. 

Miss Evertson was vice-principal; stern, sarcastic and silent; few 
loved, though all respected her; and I learned to value her curt "well 
done," a commendation never bestowed unless merited. She called the 
roll, and I can hear her voice now as she alluded to "the wrapper bri- 
gade," the late girls who answered from the lower end of the long parlor. 
Miss Evertson timed the ringing of the bells, and on Saturday rang for 
the sewing hour. This was a summons entirely disregarded except in 
her dormitory. On one occasion she found Mildred Lee reading. When 
asked why she was not sewing she said she had nothing to mend except 
one old garment and nothing to mend it with. "I will get you some 
pieces" said Miss E. Now Mildred's garment was soft and white, but 
alas ! it was war-time, and Miss Evertson' s patches were coarse and yel- 
low, but Mildred received them graciously; and thereafter her work 
afforded great amusement for hearts, diamonds and stars were neatly 
appliqued, the yellow muslin on the white cambric being quite effective. 
Those were happy days and I had many friends, but the war closed a 




Rev. BENNETT SMEDES, D.D., 1837-1899. 
Second Rector of St. Mary's, 1877-1899. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 13 



few months after I left ; postal service was suspended in the rural dis- 
tricts of Virginia for a long time, so I lost sight of many who it would 
gladden me to know had not forgotten "the days that are no more." 



Among the many pictures that time has painted for me on "memory's 
walls" few give me more pleasure than the group formed in the two 
happy years I spent at old St. Mary's. It was on a glowing August day 
that I alighted from the omnibus and took a survey of the surroundings. 
The main building was not handsome nor imposing, but nature had done 
her best to transform the covered way and the East Kock House into 
"things of beauty." The multiflora roses ran riot over the covered way 
and the "cloth of gold" spread its deep green drapery over the old grey 
rocks, the little gardens around the rock houses were gay with flowers, 
while the green" grass and stately old trees made St, Mary's a pleasant 
place to look upon. The main part of the East Rock House was then 
used as a painting room, and back of it were two small rooms occupied 
by Miss Liddell, the art teacher, Agnes Atkinson and myself. 

After resting a little I went to the door and while standing there two 
nice looking girls came up. They introduced themselves as 'Tolly Hig- 
gins" and "Betsey Bump" and asked me to go to walk with them. 

It would now seem that the queer names should have put me on my 
oiiard, but I was a simple little country girl, whose education had been 
conducted at home, disposed to accept the somewhat startling conditions 
of school life as portrayed by my companions, till as we returned I re- 
marked on the convenience of the covered way. "Oh, yes," one of them 
replied, "it does very well in summer, but in winter it is divided into 
cow stalls, and my ! I do hate it when it comes my turn to milk." This 
was too much, so with much dignity I left them and went in to Agnes 
who was an "old girl." My indignation was not lessened when I found 
that there were no girls named Polly and "Betsey" there; but I after- 
wards knew them as Mary Evans and Jennie McRae. 



While looking through my writing desk recently I came across a 
memento of old St. Mary's which recalled an incident in which the old 
desk figured. As I have said, at that time the larger part of the first 



14 The. St. Mart's Muse. 



floor of the East Rock House was the painting room and back of that 
were two small rooms — one of which at that time was occupied by 
Rachel Miller and myself. The windows were accessible from the 
ground, but we took no precautions and felt no fear. One morning we 
found the window open, and it did not take us long to discover that our 
desks were gone, though nothing else had been taken. There was little 
of value in the desks but great was the excitement caused by the burglary. 
There were foot-prints under the window, but they were soon lost in the 
autumn leaves which covered the grass. The desks were found later 
in a remote part of the grounds, the locks broken and contents scattered. 
George Smedes, then a boy of twelve, hauled them up in a promiscuous 
heap in his goat cart and Rachel and I had some difficulty in assorting 
our letters. 



A letter which I found in that same old desk recalls another well- 
remembered incident. It was one lovely Sunday in the summer of '64. 
We knew on Saturday that a fierce battle was raging and many of the 
girls had near and dear relatives in the army. Dr. Smedes' son Edward 
was with the forces engaged in battle, so when Sunday morning dawned, 
cloudless and bright though it was, the girls moved quietly, and even 
nature seemed to wear a hushed and expectant air. We were assembled 
in the Chapel, the service nearly over, when a messenger appeared at 
the door. Madame Gouye went out and Dr. "Smedes in a trembling 
voice pronounced the benediction and knelt at the altar. We quietly 
withdrew and then madame sent his little daughter to him with the 
teleo-ram which announced that a third son had been sacrified on the 
altar of his country. We did not see our beloved Rector again that day, 
but the morrow found him at the post of duty, pale and sad, but as brave 
a soldier as the sons who fell in battle. 



Pleasant Recollections, 1869-TO.— " Smedesborough." 

BY " NELLIE JACKSON " (MRS. .JOHN T. MASON OF R. , BALTIMORE, Ml).). 

As T write of St. Mary's in 1869 and 1870 such pictures rise before 
my mind that I cannot select which it is best to describe, or rather which 
I can possibly leave out. Not Dr. Smedes, the presiding genius of the 



The St. Mart's Muse. 



15 



place with his cheeks pink as a baby's, his eyes as blue as the summer 
skies, his silvery wavy hair and the sweetest smile ever seen. Not "Mr. 
Bennett" the wonderful scholar and the gentle teacher ! Not Mrs. Ire- 
dell, the best loved and the best loving of the teachers ! Not dear "Miss 
Katie," the sympathizer, as she was a girl herself ! Not Mrs. Bancker 
Smedes who took such good care of the sick girls and the well ones too, 
with lovely "Niecie" as her companion. Mademoiselle Le Gal and Jen- 
nie and Miss Sherwood rise up before me as I write, and all the Smedes' 
children whom I have loved for thirty-seven years and shall love forever. 

Miss Stella Shaw first untaught me and then taught me in her wise 
way to play without, slurring the notes, and "Music Nights" were robbed 
of half their terrors by her quiet words of encouragement. 

No service in any church has ever been quite the same to me as the 
service in the Chapel with the antiphonal chanting of the Psalter. When 
I heard it again many years later, when happier days had come and 
gone, it did not sound the same. The girls did not sing with so much 
heart, and vim. Sing out, girls of 1906, make the walls ring with your 
songs of praise. 

On September 3, 1869, was published the first number of the 
"Embryo" the official organ of the "Utile Ducli" Society of which 
society I was president. We held weekly meetings and published a 
monthly paper which all the teachers and non-members had to hear 
read. I believe the notes will be interesting to many and copy it : 

President Nellie Jackson. 

Vice-President Ida McCullough. 

Treasurer / Fannie Johnston. 

Secretary Jennie Hargraves. 

MEMBERS. 

Carrie Bacot. Lina Deputy, Sallie Mallet, Alice Smedes. 

Ida Bell, Sarah Dewell, Maggie McDonald, Nannie Shipp, 

Cora Brashears, Fannie Glenn, Amelia McKimmon. Constantia Townsend, 

Kate Cannon, Mattie Harlie. Annie Mitchell, Eugenia Thomson. 

Lizzie Berry, Sue Henderson, Augusta Porcher, Annie Trapier, 

Eliza Blount, Annie Hill, Mollie Shaw, Edith Trapier, 

Sallie Clayton, Jennie LeGal, May Shober, Nellie Wordworth, 

Annie Cornwell, Annie B. Jones, Bessie Smedes, Jennie Coffin, 

Georgia Cornwell, Pattie Martin, Annie Smedes, Lily Brown. 



IQ The St. Mary's Muse. 



In the "Embryo" the school was called "Smedesborough," Dr. 
Smedes the "mayor," Mrs. Iredell's dormitory "Iredellton Square," 
Miss Sherwoods' "Sherwood Place," etc. The dining room was the 
"City Hotel," the study the "Mayor's office," the sick room the "Hos- 
pital," etc, 

I copy one extract from the Embryo September 3, 1869 : "It is not 
without a blush of shame for my fellow citizens that I enter upon a 
subject upon which they have been often warned — the City Gate. You 
know not what you are doing when you leave it carelessly open behind 
you ! The other morning two of us citizens went beyond the town limits 
to pay a visit to the family of Mr. Geo. Mordecai ; on returning they 
as usual neglected to close the gate; unluckily for them they met his 
Honor the Mayor. With a stern face, but without a word, he pointed to 
the open gate. The friends looked at each other for a moment, then 
bent their heads in guilty fear, but happily one of them at that juncture 
"beheld in the road a white object which they recognized as the horse of 
the physician of Smedesborough: she exclaimed in triumph, "We left 
the gate open for the doctor." The mayor looked at her with a meaning 
smile, but said no more. Alas, these citizens knew not how much truth 
there was in their words that they left the gate open for the doctor, for 
in a few clays both were taken ill and paid the usual penalty of subter- 
fuge. "Shut the Gate ! ! !" 

As I have written each girl's name her face comes before me in the 
happy surroundings of dear old St. Mary's. May her daughters ever 
do her the honor she deserves, our Alma Mater. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 17 



St. Mary's of a By-Gone Day. 



BY "EMMIE MCVEA" (MISS EMILIE W. MCVEA, UNIVERSITY CINCINNATI, CINCINNATI, 
OHIO; PUPIL OF ST. MARY'S, 1877-'84 ; GRADUATE, '84; TEACHER, '86; LADY-PRIN- 
CIPAL, 1895-1900 ; instructor, university Tennessee, 1902-'03 ; university Cin- 
cinnati, 1904 — PRESENT. 

A queer old-fashioned little girl with short, straight hair "roached" 
back by a round comb, small, eager, brown eyes and a chubby face ; a 
big little girl who filled out her gray woolen dress and short-sleeved 
black alpaca apron almost too snugly for comfort and who wondered 
whether the hands and feet so hard to keep still were as much in other 
people's way as they were in hers. She felt serious as well as expectant 
for this was her first day at St. Mary's and she knew that many solemn 
and interesting things may happen on one's first day at school. She 
had been before to schools for small people, but St. Mary's was very 
large and had dormitories for the "boarders" with alcoves and cunning 
white beds — later experience taught her that the beds, though pretty, 
were anything but soft— a chapel of its own, the largest parlor that the 
small girl had ever seen, and quite a bewildering number of stairs and 
"covered ways," In fact that first day she succeeded in quite losing 
herself, and to her amazement found herself in the parlor when she had 
expected to be at the geography class in the Rock House. The "old 
girls" kissed Sally, Mary and Kate in the hall, met on the porch other 
friends whose arrival had been announced by the tooting of the omnibus 
horn at the big gate, called a jolly how-dye-do to the day scholars hur- 
rying up the front steps and seemed to the big little girl to be awe- 
inspiringly intimate with Mademoiselle, Miss Katie and Mrs. Iredell. 
Would she ever dare to speak naturally and easily to Miss Katie whom 
she already adored in secret ? She felt rather lonely in the midst of the 
pleasant noise and merriment, but pretty soon one of the Juniors noticed 
her and took her to the "office," Mrs. Meares' comfortable home-like 
sitting room. The dignity of being "classed" and given a slip of paper 
with her studies and hours carefully written on it added much to her 
feeling of importance and made the interview with the Lady Principal 
delicious if somewhat "scarey." Such was her first experience at St. 
Mary's, the place which was later to become so familiar and so dear 
to her. 



18 The St. Mary's Muse. 

The editors of the Muse of the twentieth century have asked that 
St. Mary's girl of the by-gone days to write for them some account of 
the customs of "long ago," but to us who were a part of those dear days 
the fun, the joys, the study and the friendships seem as real and almost 
as near as the events of yesterday. You girls of 1906 have your special 
pleasures and many more comforts than we had. You have for instance 
much more comfortably heated buildings, but then you know nothing 
of the fun of stoves or of their important bearing on lessons. You can 
never have the happiness and the relief which sometimes came to us 
when, as we waited in ignorance and agony our time to recite, the door 
of the recitation room would open and "uncle Wash" would shuffle in 
to shake down the fire and put on fresh coal, a process so noisy and so 
prolonged that the recitation perforce ceased for a time and very pos- 
sibly the clanging of the big bell released the miserably expectant ones. 
Yes, stoves were great institutions, not only did they help us out in our 
recitations but on dark rainy afternoons during walking hour the school 
room stove made a delightful gathering place, and grouped about it we 
passed many a happy time singing, reading, gossiping and eating candy, 
if we happened to have the money to buy it and "Miss Jane" were on 
hand with her basket from Royster's. Sometimes, but this is a great 
confidence, we even cooked on the stove in the dormitory. Of course we 
weren't supposed to do it, but once in a very long while on Saturday 
morning after our beds were made, our alcoves cleaned and dusted and 
we were sitting around the stove reading or grumblingiy trying to write 
a composition — not a theme — some especially idle and courageous girl 
would propose baked apples and candy, and then such fun as we had 
begging or buying apples and sugar and cooking our delectable messes ! 
Some of the apples were burnt and we rarely had enough butter for the 
candy, but no matter, there were never any cores of those apples or 
crumbs of that candy! We were usually careful to cook things which 
didn't make much smoke, but once alas, we forgot and toasted cheese and 
broiled steak. The cheese was an especial offence because Miss Katie 
detested mice. We had a beautiful time, finished our "spread," put 
away all signs of the feast, and were preparing to spend the remainder 
of the, short winter afternoon in unusual jollification, when the door 



The St. Mary's Muse. 19 



opened and Miss Katie walked in ! One significant sniff and the horrid 
truth was revealed ; we had not only been eating but we had been cooking 
in the dormitory! Miss Katie was goodness itself to us, but she was 
always strict, and we paid the full penalty of our transgression. The 
stoves, however, were one of the delights of the very early days ; soon the 
brick furnace in the basement vanished, the Baltimore heaters were re- 
moved and their places filled by an engine-house and radiators. 

During the years I spent at St, Mary's we had no clubs nor sororities 
so we never had banquets, but we had "boxes," and there never were 
boxes so good as those which "Chip," "Mittie," "Annie," the Kavenels 
and all the other girls used to get from home. The catalogue said that 
"boxes" were causes of illness and should be sent, if at all, at "rare inter- 
vals," but when there are many girls even infrequent boxes mount up. 
Perhaps lessons had gone wrong or your best friend was cross and in- 
clined to be snappish; suddenly, just after study hour, a "thud" on the 
hall floor and the cheerful voice of Mr. Pence anounced express; a 
moment later and the news would spread rapidly that "Annie" had the 
biggest kind of birthday box from home. If you were an intimate 
friend you told the joyful tidings to Annie as she sauntered along the 
brick walk from practicing; if you were not intimate you let some one 
else do the announcing and waited, divided between hope and fear, to 
see whether you were "invited to the box." And such a box ! Turkey, 
home-cured ham, beaten biscuit, candy, cake of all kinds, jellies, even 
chicken salad and pickled oysters. First of all plates were begged from 
"Miss Jennie," filled with the best of all the good things carefully cov- 
ered with napkins and carried to the rooms of Annie's best beloved 
teachers. ■ Then we girls, a generous number, without plates or forks, 
after the rather primitive method of the pious ^neas, with whom we 
were then probably laboring, helped ourselves and feasted royally. 
There never was such good cooking, nor were there ever hungrier or 
more appreciative guests. If the New Bern girls were invited, and they 
always were, we ended with jolly songs and jollier laughter, for the New 
Bern girls had a genius for fun. After awhile there came into vogue 
another kind of party which all the St, Mary's girls of that time remem- 
ber with pleasure. Sometimes an enterprising person, having- ventured 



20 The St. Mary's Muse. 

into the kitchen to beg salt for apples or nuts, would return on tip-toe 
with the exciting news, "Girls, I do believe Miss Etta is going to give a 
party tonight." Sure enough at the end of study hour we would be 
asked to come to the dining room at eight instead of half after seven, 
and there we would find the tables beautifully out of their usual order 
and chosen girls ready to help "Miss Etta" pass the big plates of chicken 
salad, the beaten biscuit and the eups of chocolate. Everyone was invited 
to these parties, no one was in the least afraid of being left out. The 
only awkward moment came when we began to thank our hostess. The 
most self-possessed girl would say, "O, Miss Etta, we have had such a 
lovely time," and her companion would invariably chime in "We cer- 
tainly have," followed in turn by every member of the long line. Finally 
our thanks became a formula and all Mrs. Smedes ever expected was 
"We certainly have, Miss Etta." Some one asked me once why the St. 
Mary's girls used the word "certainly" so much, and I wondered whether 
our unique formula had anything to do with it. 

Then, as now, ITallow'een was the great general festivity of the year. 
On that occasion day scholars as well as boarders were invited, and 
during that evening continual peals of merriment issued from the school 
room and parlor. Together, day scholars and boarders, we shrieked over 
the wet kid glove filled with saw-dust passed surreptitiously from hand 
to hand under a large outspread shawl; played dumb crambo, words 
rhyming with "pale" (usually scale), "post" (equally, of course, ghost) ; 
bobbed for apples until in our ardor we plunged our entire heads into 
the tubs and then- water was forbidden and long strings tied to the gas 
jets took its place ; had our fortunes told by gypsies or with the three 
saucers; burned our fingers with snap-dragon, or followed an ingenious 
leader in the absurd and entertaining "Shaker Dance" : 

"I put my right foot in, 

I put my right foot out, 
I give my right foot a shake, shake, shake, 

And I turn myself about." 

Our daily routine began early and did not provide for much spare 
time. The rising bell rang at six o'clock, and in the winter six o'clock 
is very dark and very cold ! Naturally some of us did not arise with 
eagerness at the first tap of the bell, and at times some of us slept beyond 



The St. Mary's Muse. 21 



the possibility of getting to roll call. I can still hear Miss Katie calling 
from her alcove "Alice" — it was always Alice, she was never on time — 
"get up, get up, it is long after half -past six." Dear Miss Kate! it was 
the only point in which we ever knew her to diverge from strictest ac- 
curacy ; at that moment the hands of the dormitory clock pointed to 32 
minutes past six! Such early rising necessitated a midday lunch, a 
slight repast which we scorned in anticipation, but ate with relish at 
noon. Down into the store-room we filed in long procession, wondering 
whether it would be ginger-cakes or cheese, to find the four big waiters 
ready for us on the table, two filled with apples and two with little piles 
of crackers, three in each pile, the housekeeper assisted by a Senior 
handing an apple and three crackers to each girl. Cheese and ginger- 
bread frequently took the place of apples, and in the spring we often had 
strawberries, a whole box to two girls. Strawberry days were gala occa- 
sions, for we "capped" our berries ourselves and in groups of twos and 
fours had little feasts in the grove. Simple pleasures and .simple fare, 
but beautiful opportunities for the cultivation of friendships which 
endure warm and fresh to-day. We had both morning and afternoon 
walking hours, and in cold weather we always wore shawls — indeed, 
shawls were a part of the necessary school outfit mentioned in the cata- 
logue, not to wear one on a chilly day meant a "disorder," or if the day 
were very cold, five disorders. Some of the teachers had red crocheted 
shawls which were our admiration and many of us were so fired with 
ambition to possess one of the soft, woolly wraps that during the earlier 
part of each year in evening recreation hour a group of girls generally 
surrounded Miss Katie or Mrs. Iredell, most patient of teachers, dili- 
gently learning to crochet plain, shell, or crazy stitch. Walking hour 
then "was sometimes chilly, sometimes muddy, and we often rebelled 
against rubbers, hats and shawls, but recollection holds for us chiefly 
the delightful arm-in-arm confidences, the absurd old singing lessons 
under Maude or Lalla, "up-down, up-down, sing!" and then the burst 
of uproarous, inconsequential song-nonsense, the occasional energetic 
races, the violet hunts in the spring, when we returned, blissfully hatless 
and shawlless from the lower end of the grove with armfulls of lovely 
pae purple crow-foot violets. 



22 The St. Mary's Muse. 



We had a plenty of well-directed work and studied hard, but that, 
you will find, does not impress itself so deeply on one's recollection, it 
is just a part of the business of life. We had, however, some most sol- 
emn times with reference to these same lessons, occasions, I believe, 
which have entirely passed away at St. Mary's. On Friday afternoons 
pupils and teachers assembled in the big school room, Mr. Smedes and 
Miss Czarnomska on the rostrum, the teachers in the front row of chairs. 
Solemn silence, then first one and then another teacher arose and "read 
out marks" : "Misses Smith and Brown have perfect marks in history 
for the past week, Misses Jones and Thomas are doing good work." If 
you were doing poor work you were simply not "read out." Oh, the 
mortification of not having your name read in the school room on Friday 
afternoon. At the end of the month there was a still more awe-inspiring 
occurrence, the reading of the monthly reports. First grade 95 to 100, 
second grade, third grade ; below the third grade no one was mentioned. 
Perhaps once in a long while when you knew that you had studied very 
hard, after moments of thrilling expectancy you would realize that Miss 
Czarnomska had called your name first and that you had actually "led 
the school." That moment more than repaid for the month of toil. In 
addition to our regular work we had always especially arranged lectures 
and concerts, but the lectures we loved most were those Bishop Lyman 
gave. Two or three times during the year the Bishop came to us inform- 
ally, and after tea, quite an unusually festive affair, he would talk to 
us of his travels in Italy, in France, in Germany, in Russia. Many an 
exquisite glimpse he gave us of the grey-castled Rhine, the blue waters 
of the Mediterranean, the quaint crowed fair at Niji, or the splendors 
of Rome. We loved his visits and always welcomed with enthusiasm 
the news "the Bishop will be with us to-morrow." His interest in St. 
Mary's was lively and sincere, and, as I learned after his death, there 
was never a year during his connection with the school that some girls 
of limited means had not through his generosity the advantages offered 
by St. Mary's. 

In those days we had no literary clubs and no debates, but we had 
frequent delightful readings, readings which probably did more than 
any systematized course of study to train us into a love of good litera- 



The St. Mary's Muse. 23 



ture. On Sunday afternoons when we were quite young we had beau- 
tiful times in Miss Tew's dormitory. Miss Tew was adored by every 
one of us ; we thought her a wonder of wisdom and learning ; and even 
now it is almost impossible to realize that she could not then have been 
more than nineteen or twenty. With her we learned to know and love 
John Halifax, the hero of a Noble Life, and Ethel, Norman, Dr. May, 
Guy, Amy and all the other delightful people of Miss Yonge's immense 
families. * Just to see the title of one of Miss Yonge's novels brings back 
those Sunday afternoons in the old upstairs dormitory and the group 
of girls listening eagerly to the charming voice with its distinctive South 
Carolina intonation reading of the simple joys and sorrows of the Heir 
of Kedcliffe. When we were older we gathered every Wednesday and 
Friday evening for an hour in Mrs. Iredell's dainty, cozy room and 
heard her beautiful reading of Scott's novels, of Marmion, the Lady of 
the Lake, the Lay of the Last Minstrel, Chaucer's Tales, the Rape of the 
Lock, the Idylls of the King and a host of other memorable books and 
poems. Then, as Seniors, we met every evening during the week with 
Miss Czarnomska and read and discussed such writers as Carlyle, 
Prescott, George Eliot, William Morris and Browning. As a relaxation 
after especially laborious work as editors of the Muse we occasionally 
made merry over a book of pure nonsense like "Happy Thoughts," and 
once I remember we had to close the doors of Miss Czarnomska's sit- 
ting room lest the excessive mirth of the dignified Seniors should scan- 
dalize the little Preps. During the week-day reading hours we were 
allowed to do fancy work, and Mrs. Iredell and Miss Czarnomska 
taught some of the girls to make all sorts of lovely things ; dainty doll 
clothes for the little sisters at home, shawls, slippers, embroidered flan- 
nels and table covers. Your writer, alas, was never "handy" with a 
needle, crochet or otherwise, and so after the production of a shawl or 
two she fell back with unfailing regularity on the making of paper 
lamp-lighters as her work, and was scorned in consequence by her more 
ambitious sewing friends. Of course the girls had fads in fancy work ; 
when rick-rack, for instance, was in vogue, I am sure the girls produced 
hundreds of yards of the trimming. So fascinating was the occupation 
that it even furnished Maude Aymette with material for a poem for the 
Muse. 



24 The St. Mary's Muse. 



In our fun and in our work, however, the real influence of the school, 
an influence which inspired the devoted love of the students and which 
left its indelible impress upon our lives, was the personality of the 
Rector and of the teachers who were his loyal and ready helpers. Real 
motive power is not always discernible at close range, but looking back 
to those days now with the clearer view of mature years we know that 
the centralizing force was the unswerving nobility of Dr. Bennett 
Smedes' ideal of and for women, his entire merging of self in the purpose 
of his work and his unsurpassed reverence for spiritual things. His 
teachers responded nobly to his confidence in them ; almost without 
exception they worked for love of St. Mary's ; they gave largely of their 
heart as well as of their intellect, and unconsciously the girls realized 
this and so our teachers were our warm friends and advisors. They 
helped us choose our very simple winter dresses and hats, they advised 
us about our Christmas shopping and showed us how to make pretty 
inexpensive presents, they made us at home in their rooms, and a quiet 
talk on Sunday afternoons with a favorite teacher has helped many a 
girl over a difficult place. Of course among all our many teachers there 
were a few who held aloof from the real spirit of the school, we did not 
know quite what was the matter, but we felt that they were different. 
Naturally like all girls since time began, we had our bad days when we 
didn't know our lessons when the teachers were all "cross old things" — 
either they were or we were, I can't at this distance of time tell which — 
even when in a burst of wrath we hated the "old school." But we knew 
very well that we didn't hate it and that altogether we had a happy 
school life of some hard study and some wholesome play, and that above 
all we loved and admired St. Mary's. 

And the heart of St. Mary's was the chapel ; small, brown, not especi- 
ally beautiful to the stranger, but filled for us with holiest memories. 
The orderly reverent daily chapel service, the glorious strains of the 
music of high festivals, the beauty of holiness which illuminated the 
minister are influences for good that will abide with us forever. The 
yellow and white of chrysanthemums, the glory of autumn leaves, the 
sound of the All Saints Day collects and hymns, the lilies of Easter and 
of Ascension Day and the joyous prayers and praise of those feast days 



The St. Mary's Muse. 25 



of the church come to us now deepened and made more sacred by the 
memory of the services of long ago, the services in the small brown 
chapel that we loved. 

Such are some of my recollections of St. Mary's as I knew it; the 
St. Mary's which during all those years was guided and sustained by 
a man who obliterated self and exalted his work, a man of entire purity 
of purpose and lofty ideals, who guarded all that was best in the old 
traditions of education, but who recognized fully the meaning and the 
need of the educational thought of the newer day. 



To Miss Katie. 



To long for truth, to try to realize 

The highest that we see — that is the noblest 

Living, and that, dear friend, in all these years 

Your high sincerity, your love of love, 

Your hatred of deceit and scorn of all pretence 

Have helped us to desire, 

Thinking of you. 

We knoio that love and truth are real, 
That God and good are the eternal verities. 
Noisy ambition, hard won fame, the wish 
For recognition even of worthy work, 
Beside these vital truths fade into nothingness. 
To do good, and to distribute of your love 
And of your strength to them that need, that 
Has been your life. And with such service, 
God is pleased. 

Emilie W. McVea. 



26 The St. Mary's Muse. 



When McKimmonsviile Flourished. 



BY ; ' JESSIE DEGEX," 1892-'94 (MIPS JESSIE C. DEGEX, AUGUSTA, MAINE. 



When Miss Katie said, "Write what you remember of St. Mary's as 
you knew it," it seemed to the Old Girl (i. e., the author, who counts 
"an old St. Mary's girl" as the proudest title in the world) not only a 
delightful thing to do, but an easy one. As she thought it over, however, 
she grew doubtful. "What I remember !" But I remember enough to 
fill two fat books. And how can I tell what changes there are ? They 
have some new buildings — and I believe the Bishop's house is right on 
top of my favorite patch of violets — but I don't know much more. Miss 
Katie and Miss Dowd and Miss Fenner are still there — but who else % 
Do they still study "Butler" and "Paley" and "Green ?" Do they still 
dine at half-past three, and do they still go down to the store-room at 
noon and get, each for her luncheon, those familiar three crackers (such 
good crackers) with the occasional luxury of a piece of cheese? Do 
they still have to write the dreaded "abstracts" of every Friday's Chapel 
address? Do they still have the yet more awful "Beading Out" on 
Friday afternoons, with all the faculty in a row on the school room plat- 
form • your own heart thumping wildly as each teacher rose and read 
out the week's honor roll of her class — oh, horror, if your name should 
be left out ! Do they still — or do they — ? But she could not voice that 
last. The new catalogue a day or two later answered many of these 
questionings. The Old Girl paused to shake her head over the binding 
and to reflect on how much prettier shiny light-blue covers were; then 
she turned hastily to the back of the catalogue to a paragraph headed 
"Bequisites ;" then she said, "Oh, dear! They do!" in a tone that 
brought her family flying to her side. "What is it ? Do what ?" they 
cried. "Oh, dear, they do ! they do ! I always feared it and now- 
just see — yes, they do wear golf capes in walking hour instead of 
shawls!" For the joy of getting back, the Old Girl would willingly 
oive up her long-cherished intention of taking her old red-and-black plaid 
shawl to wear whenever she should revisit St. Mary's. But every insti- 
tution has its own collection of little jokes and stories, growing old with 
their Alma Mater; so it does seem sad that new girls at St. Mary's 



The St. Mary's Muse. 27 



should no longer be regaled with that time-honored and exquisitely funny 
tale of the man who passed by the school during walking hour and look- 
ing at the shawled figures pacing the walks inquired if that was the 
insane asylum. 

Such changes as the vanishing of the shawls are natural in so many 
years ; and there must be other similar ones, though the real St. Mary's 
surely can never change. Other things, like the lectures, the literary 
societies, basket-ball, the College, have come with the growth of the 
school. In '93 we had four buildings only. The little girls lived in 
Miss Devereaux's and Miss Pearson's "dorms." at the top of the mail? 
building; the middle-sized girls— the "Junior A's" and "Senior B's" in 
Miss Dowd's — in the West Rock House ; while the "Senior A's" rejoiced 
in their seniority largely because it brought them into the charmed 
precincts of "Miss Katie's." x\nd what precincts they were! You 
Seniors who live in rooms miss the best part of your St. Mary's life, 
did you but know it. Can it be possible that girls are graduated nowa- 
days who have never shouted "Rah ! rah ! rah ; we give with a will, three 
good cheers for M ~ cKimmonsville I" who do not look forward, as the 
height of their ambition to coming back as "old girls," sitting on that 
little stool by Miss Katie's rocking-chair of an evening and talking over 
old times — perhaps even wearing for the time one of those delightful 
red-knitted shawls — and being looked at with envy and awe by all the 
Seniors in the dormitory ? 

We never hoped that the city corporation of McKimmonsville would 
last long. In '93 and '94 it was at the height of its glory — an organiza- 
tion inspired by — was it that famous circus-night (private to McKim- 
monsville) when we found that curled-lip trunk-straps made such capital 
tails for the band of trained monkeys in gym suits % or was it the great 
pillow-fight between Sarah Kenan and Mary Gatlin and the faithful 
adherents of either side ? It was the latter at any rate which led to the 
"Lays of McKimmonsville," published in the "McKimmonsville Weekly 
]^"ews," and beginning with the ringing lines : 

"Bold Kenan of McKimmonsville, 

By the nine gods she swore, 
That the great house of Kenan 

Should suffer wrong no more. 



28 The St. Mary's Muse. 



By the nine gods she swore it, 

And sat her down to think, 
Her plans how best might be expressed, 

With paper, pen and ink.**— etc., (not hard to compose) ! 

In our day the Muse was suffering a period of depression and did not 
appear for some years. The only school periodical was the above-men- 
tioned "Weekly News" (limited edition), laboriously printed on an 
ill-behaved Duplicator that was the bane of the editors' lives. Kate 
Broadfoot, do you remember those hot, toilsome evenings under a lamp 
in the east recitation room when the green ink would get all over one's 
hands, and the "News" seemed very long and dull 1 The "News" had 
not a long life ; but, as newspapers will, it first created and then healed 
the wholly imaginary Kenan-Gatlin feud ; it was instrumental in elect- 
ing the Mayor and Council and in securing various reforms ; and cer- 
tainly it bound the citizens closer by accentuating their common inter- 
ests. Therefore may the faculty of that day forgive its taking some 
hours which might better have been spent on "Lit." or Virgil or Conic 

Sections. 

There must have been lectures, etc., in those days, and various im- 
proving interests ; but the Old Girl confesses that the events which stand 
out in her memory are the occasional Sundays spent at Mrs. Tucker's 
(what need to dwell on those rare pleasures ? We all remember every 
minute of such days) ; Mrs. Smedes' suppers to the school, given three 
or four times a year, and always a glorious surprise : oh, that chicken 
salad ! and oh, those beaten biscuit ! in a land where the beaten biscuit 
is unknown the mere memory makes the Old Girl's mouth water; the 
music recitals and the annual visit of "the Kavenel twins" or "the Ravs." 
in the affectionately disrespectful whispers of the girls. The McKim- 
monsville citizens had celebrations of their own also, as the May picnic 
when the Oldest Inhabitant was crowned May Queen; and the Oldest 
Inhabitant's birthday when there came a box of sufficiently generous 
dimensions to feed sixteen hungry girls. The Old Girl was almost alone 
in not taking music lessons ; therefore of the recitals she can tell you 
only that Bessie Henderson's dress was trimmed with the most alluring 
pink rosebuds possible; that Miss Dugger used to sing "The Garden of 
Sleep" in a voice that carried us girls straight to an enchanted garden ; 



The St. Mary's Muse. 29 



that Helen and Mary Smedes and Florence and Mary Kinsey Boylan 
sometimes played, perched up on very high stools, and apparently had 
some difficulty in stretching their small fingers over an octave; and the 
Old Girl hopes that Annie Gregg's daughter will some day come to St. 
Mary's, and at recitals will play that charming thing of Grieg's which 
her mother loved and so often played. "The Ravs" came in the fall, 
and stayed for a week or so — but surely they still come, and you know 
what jolly times come with them ? In '93, at any rate, an air of festivity 
hung over the School while they were there. Mrs. Smedes gave us a 
supper. Miss Slater coached the girls as only she could, and they gave 
one of the plays for which Miss Slater was more famous than the actors. 
There were always so many funny stories to hear and such gay faces and 
voices everywhere. Somehow lessons were easier and walking hour no 
longer tedious: — and then some evening they would knock at the door of 
McKimmonsville with the familiar "May I come in, Miss Katie ?" and 
sit on hassocks — and so forth, all just as we meant to do some day when 
we were Old Girls. 

Such memories make one realize how well we all knew each other and 
how much family life we had, more than is possible where the students 
are scattered as they now are. Twelve years ago everything centered 
about the main building; the Art building was comparatively unfa- 
miliar ground, even to those who recited "Butler" or sketched there. 
The practice rooms were in the East Rock House over the heads of some 
long suffering teachers who had rooms on the first floor; and to the 
practice rooms at examination times repaired a procession of anxious 
students armed with "Green" and "Butler," Logic and Astronomy text- 
books, the entire contents of which were supposed to be mastered in 
those frantic final hours of cramming. The Old Girl — and probably 
many another — can still reel off with little hesitation the outline of the 
Analogy ; and certain pages of Green's History, forever fixed word for 
word in her mind, are associated with that end room looking towards the 
front, where she and Green were silent companions for certain painful 
hours of "systematic review." But we. lived at the main building. 
From morning roll-call and prayers, before breakfast, through the 
school hours, walking hour, afternoon study hour, supper, evening roll- 



30 The St. Mary's Muse. 



call, when each girl reported her own disorder and punctuality marks 
for the day, prayers, dancing, evening study hour down to the 9 :30 bell, 
the dormitories never saw us save for a few minutes before each meal. 
Shawls hung in the main building, and during the day permission must 
be obtained before any forgetful soul could go into her dormitory for 
any article overlooked in the morning. One's desk was a real treasure 
trove of books, writing materials and letters, more or less wearing ap- 
parel and one's orange from Sunday dessert (which reminds the Old 
Girl that visiting parents were apt to be embarrassed by their daughter's 
"You don't like oranges do you ? Be sure to bring yours away from the 
table for me !") In short, one's desk held all the necessities of life, and 
public opinion did not think it unseemly when a choice spirit who shall 
here be nameless, shut up in her seat-mate's desk a black cat as a de- 
lightful ( ?) surprise for the beginning of school. In the main building 
was the Library, in the second-floor hall, and there books were doled 
out on Saturday afternoons — indeed our Saturdays, save for mending 
hour or a trip down town, were usually spent at the main building. 
There we copied from the school room board our Bible lessons for the 
coming week, to be learned by heart and recited in the school room every 
morning before lessons began. Eba Salisbury kept all those lessons in a 
blank book — "so useful to have them all ready to give out when I'm 
teaching school ;" and the Old Girl, following the example of this bril- 
liant idea, found years later that she had a pretty thorough scriptural 
commentary on the Creed, the Lord's Prayer and the Epistles and 
Gospels for the year. It is doubtful if any of us at the time followed 
the scholarly sequences of Dr. Smedes' idea. Of course our home letters 
must be written in the school room after Sunday dinner. The Infirmary 
rooms were also in the main building over the school room, but the Old 
Girl was there only once, after the switchback accident, and her mem- 
ories are more of aches and pains than of the geography of those rooms. 
Of the many interests which were in the main building there remain 
the apartments of the Rector's family, over the parlor — rooms unfamil- 
iar to us except for our infrequent calls there, but affectionately and 
gratefully remembered because they held our beloved Rector in our 
midst. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 31 



It is quite impossible to write of Dr. Smedes' gracious presence any- 
thing which could give this generation the knowledge of what his per- 
sonality was to every girl in the school. But the Old Girl never thinks 
of the building without seeing his figure coming down the front stairs 
and his kindly smile for her; and she thinks that from that gentle spirit 
which so quietly yet so surely dominated the school she learned her best 
lessons of womanly grace and godliness of living. Indeed he was "a 
father to all the girls ;" and surely the girls of to-day must hand down 
from one class to another the familiar traditions of his generosity and 
unfailing goodness to generations of girls. His memory is loved and 
admired by many who never knew him personally, and by those who 
did know him with gratitude for the privilege. 

Tor this example, perhaps, and perhaps for other reasons the faculty 

were, it seems to the Old Girl, singularly united in their work and their 

kindness to the girls. A number were themselves old St. Mary's girls, 

and that fact may have brought them nearer to us ; certainly we enjoyed 

their comradeship and their reminiscences, and certainly they were good 

to us ! It is hard to think of anybody but Miss Annie Harvey presiding 

in the store-room— kind Miss Annie, who notwithstanding that she made 

the very best spongecake in the world, was loved even more for herself. 

And the Old Girl could never have written these pages but for Miss 

Devereaux's help over that awful bogy, her first composition. The 

memory of Miss Devereaux's look of happiness (and she couldn't have 

felt happy over many of those compositions) has pulled the Old Girl 

out of more than one fit of the blues. And can it be that girls at St. 

Mary's nowadays learn their Latin and History and Literature without 

Miss Emmie McVea ? Dear Miss Emmie, who was so disobliging about 

the matter of having her picture taken (no — not even in a school group) 

and so delightfully obliging and jolly about everything else. Miss 

Emmie's inform al weekly talks for the Seniors, on current events, were 

given at irregular times on the steps leading from the recitation room 

to the east covered way, and nobody had to come but everybody wanted 

to, the present current events class of which those talks were precursors 

never can be so interesting. The Old Girl would like to tell here of the 

celebration over Cleveland's election in '92 ; of the time that the body 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



of Jefferson Davis was borne through the city; of Governor Vance, 
and of other great events in our outside world — but she must rather say 
that she never had a teacher who made all her studies and class-work 
so thoroughly inspiring and interesting as did Miss Emmie — and she is 
not much surprised to see by the latest catalogue that since Miss Emmie 
went away it takes two men to do her work ! It is unnecessary to sing 
the praises of those who are still at the school: Miss Jones (it must be 
"Miss" Jones, I suppose, though when the Old Girl was a young Senior 
Miss Jones was such a very young junior that it is really a joke to think 
of her having grown up into a teacher) ; and Miss Dowd and the others, 
suffice it to say that according to the Old Girl's recollection there was no 
one of the teachers who did not make her birthday or any personal pleas- 
ure of hers an occasion for giving pleasure to the girls. 

Of our young and beautiful Principal, again, it is difficult to speak 
adequately. Eew of us came in touch with her in class-work. Very 
few, perhaps none of us, knew her well. We all envied the girls who 
had been at St. Mary's during her school days. But on the whole we 
felt that Miss Battle held ideals which were just right for Miss Battle 
herself, but quite beyond the reach of the rest of us. Looking back with 
keen regret at her own waywardness and "criss-crosses," and at the anx- 
ieties which seventy thoughtless girls must have laid upon shoulders 
already bowed by a struggle against ill health, the Old Girl does not 
wonder that Miss Battle seemed apart from our world. She does 
wonder at such tremendous courage. She recalls eagerly every moment 
of contact with a nature which impressed upon others so vivid a sense 
of its absolute rectitude and purity. She remembers the weekly evening 
of reading to the Seniors. Miss Battle had the gift of reading aloud, 
which would have made Arithmetic problems sound delightful, but she 
read us "The Mill on the Floss;" she introduced us to Browning and 
Matthew Arnold and opened wonderful gates to us. The Old Girl re- 
members also the few moments of devotional reading for those who 
cared to come to Miss Battle's room in the early mornings during Lent ; 
and the little society of St, Chrysostom, the purpose of which was out- 
wardly to avoid slang and other faults of speech ; inwardly "Make me a 
clean heart, O God, and renew a right spirit within me." Most of all, 
she associates Miss Battle with the Chapel. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 33 



There could be no very real recollections of St. Mary's apart from 
the Chapel. When it is called "the soul of St. Mary's" everything is 
said. In '92-'94 we had daily even-song only during Lent; and the Old 
Girl recalls the many hours spent in practicing the new responses for 
Evening Prayer, and the chants, the Magnificat and Nunc Dimittis in 
place of the "Cantate" and "Benedic anima mea" — changes peculiar to 
the new edition of the prayer book just then coming into general use. 
We did not become very familiar with the new hymnal, although on 
Easter, '94, "Ancient of Days" was first sung in place of that glorious 
old processional so popular at St. Mary's, "Jerusalem, high tower thy 
glorious walls." But Easter at St. Mary's means, first of all, the early 
service. In those years the early communion was celebrated perhaps 
four or five times in the year. Those who were privileged to attend 
those services will never forget how solemn and beautiful it was to go 
quietly into the Chapel, without the usual processional, "very early in 
the morning," to receive the Sacrament. At the close of this service 
on Easter morning we always had our most beautiful music — one or two 
anthems or one carol — before we came away. To the Old Girl Easter 
morning always brings back Miss Dugger's voice in that lovely solo (she 
remembers the music but forgets the words) beginning "Dark was the 
night" and soaring up at the end with "And from the heavens clear and 
high, a bird begins to sing. Oh hush — oh hush ! a bird begins to sing." 
The Old Girls who are trying to get acquainted with the new St. Mary's 
will find themselves turning oftenest, again and again, to the beautiful 
picture of the enlarged Chapel : without still familiar, within still dear, 
because it is St. Mary's and because of its memorials to the two souls 
who made St. Mary's what it is — the dearest place in the whole world. 



READ !— MARK I— ACT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The MUSE, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



Established 1858 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



HAVE 



& TYREE 

TO MAKE YOUR 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

EEMEMBEK IT PAYS TO GET THE BEST 



ST. MARY'S ALUMNA ASSOCIATION. 



The twenty-sixth annual meeting of the St. Mary' s 

Alumnae Association will be held in the Art Building at 

St. Mary's, on Tuesday, May 29th, 1906, at 4:30 P. M. 

For the President : 

KATE McKIMMON, 

Sec'y St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 



THE 



Dry Goods 

OF ALL KINDS 




Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

LADIES FINE SHOES «© SLIPPERS 



...Send to. 



ALFRED WILLIAMS & GO, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

BOOKS 



OF ALL KINDS 



SELECT LINE OF STATIONERY. 

Eastman's Kodaks and supplies. 
Office supplies. 



Advertisements. 



Hart-Ward Hardware Company 


¥. C. STRONACH'S SOI CO. 


RALEIGH, N. C. 

Best of everything in Hardware. Satisfaction 
guaranteed or money refunded. All-right 


1 GROCERS 




Heaters, the only perfect heater 
made. Write for prices. 


216 FAYETTEVILLE STREET 


DARNELL & THOMAS, 
Pianos and Organs. 
Sheet music and small goods. 
Raleigh, N. C. 


KING'S UP-TO-DATE DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN. 
Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets. 


KING'S GROCERY, 
"The Little Store." 


You'll find up-to-date Shoes at 

HUNTER BROS. & BREWER 



ALWAYS AT IT! 



Dey growlin' at de darkness, 

Dey growlin' at de day; 
Dey weary er de winter, 

Dey fussin' at de May; 
Dey" 11 never git ter glory 

Ef dey keep on dataway — 
Heaven ain't de country fer de growlers ! 

De woiT made ter suit 'um — 

Wuzn't dar w'en it begun, 
Ter give de Lawd instructions 

How ter swing de stars en sun! 
I wonders whar dey'll ietch up 

W'en de race er dem is run? — 
Heaven ain't de country fer de growlers! 



-Atlanta Constitution. 



THE BOYLAN-PEARGE GO. 



Dry Goods, Millinery, 
Tailored Costumes, 
Gloves, Hosiery, 
Handkerchiefs, 
Fancy Goods, 
Underwear, 



Mail orders filled intelligently and promptly. 



FAYETTKVILI.E AND SALISBURY STS. 

RALEIGH, N". C. 



.ROSENTHAL 
HO. 

G K O C E K S 

136 FAYETTEVILLE STREET 



Advertisements. 



SALVATORE DESIQ, 

Manufacturing Jeweler and Silversmith. 

1012 F. St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

On application will send any article selected. 
To St. Mary's, discount of ten per cent. 



J. S. MacDONALD CO., Jewelers. 

Diamonds, Watches, Clocks, Silverware, 

Jewelry, Class Rings, Medals and 

Badges to order. 

214 N. Charles St. Baltimore, Md. 



WE WANT your patronage in everything in 
the Jewelry, Watch and Diamond line. We 
sell only the best goods and at most reason- 
able prices. We make all kinds of college, 
class and fraternity Jewelry. Our new cata- 
logue mailed FREE to any address. 

H. SlLVERTHORN CO., 

917 Main St., Lynchburg, Va. 



ELLINGTON'S ART STORE, 

Raleigh, N. C. 
Everything in Art. 
Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs. 

For the most satisfactory work, 
Try HAYES for 

PHOTOGRAPHS. 

T. W. BLAKE, 

Rich Jewelry and Silverware. 

Repairing promptly done. 

JOLLY & WYNNE JEWELRY COMPANY, 
Wedding and Holiday presents. 
Fine Watch and Jewelry repairing. 



THE LIE OF THE BOASTER. 



I never told a little lie 

To spread a glamor o'er me, 

But that it turned up by and by 
To wreck some bridge before me. 



MORE WISDOM NEEDED. 



The fellow who brags of his college 

And all his great learning's a bore. 
The man who is "proud of his knowledge" 

Is badly in need of some more. 

— Philadelphia Ledger. 



A . D U G H I , 

RESTAURANT AND ICE CREAM PARLOR. 

Confections, Foreign and Domestic Fruits. 

CATERER. 

St. Mary's folks know and approve of Dughi. 

GOOdthing8alWaySa BRETSCH'S BAKERY. 



Buy ROYSTER'S Fine Candies. 



Private Dining and Banquet Halls at 

GIERSCH'S, 216 Fayetteville St. 



CHOICE CUT FIvOWERS 

At J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 

Leading Florists of North Carolina. 
Ralei gh, N. C. 

H. STEINM ETZ , 

FLORIST. 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns and all kinds 
Raleigh.] of Plants. [Phone 113 . 

Drugs and Perfumes, 

Toilet Articles, etc. 



ROBT. SIMPSON, 



JNO. P. HAYES, Photographer. 

Kodak work of all kinds. 



ANTICEPHALA.LGINE cures quickly and 
safely Headache in all its forma. 



Advertisements. 



THE RALEIGH BANKING AND TRUST CO. 



RALEIGH. N. C. 



Chas. H. Belvin, President. 

Chas. E. Johnson, Vice-President. 

F. H. Briggs, Cashier. 

J. B. Timberlake, Teller and Ass't Cashier. 

Safe Deposit Boxes in Fire and Burglar Proof 
Vault for rent at moderate cost. Absolutely 
safe place for keeping valuables of all kinds. 



THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C— 

Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

If its furnishing the Home, Office, School or 

Hall, see us. 

ROY ALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 

Cor. Wilmington and Hargett Streets, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

HICKS' DRUG STORE 
For Toilet Requisites and Cold Drinks. 

W. B. MANN, 
All Phones. Groceries. 11 E. Hargett St. 

PESCUD'S PHARMACY, 
12 West Hargett St., Raleigh, N. C. 

WEATHERS & PERRY, 
Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 
117 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 

Don't forget to buy your Shoes of 

S. C. POOLE'S Shoe Store. 

PERRY & ROSENTHAL, Trust Bldg. 
Ladies' Fine Shoes. 

Dr. V. E. TURNER, 
Dentist. 

J. R. FERRALL & CO.— Grocers. 
Best of everything in our line. 
22 Fayetteville Street. 

JOHN C. DREWRY. 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE.' 



The Citizens National Bank 

RALEIGH, N. C. 
Capital, $ 100,000.00 

Surplus, - - 100,000.00 

Deposits, - 1,000,000.00 

Personal Calls and Correspondence Invited 
J. G. Brown, Pres. H. E. Litchpord, Cashier 

Our ECCLESIASTICAL ART Department is 
superbly equipped for the prompt and proper 
execution of fine church work such as Altars, 
Pulpits, Lecturns, Prayer Desks, Litany 
Desks, Rood Screens, Fonts, and similar 
furnishings. Write for special church fur- 
niture catalogue. 

HANN-WANGERIN-WEICKHARDT CO., 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 



THE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY, 

Holiday Goods. 

GEO. MARSH & CO., 
Wholesale Groceries, Produce, Fruit, 
RALEIGH, N. C. 

ELLINGTON LUMBER COMPANY, 

All Sorts of Building Supplies, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



JDrink 



COFFEE 

miSTGROCEBS \ 




Dr. RUSSELL G. SHERRILL, 
Dentist. 

We make your shopping with us "pleasant 
as well as "profitable." 

A. B. STRONACH COMPANY. 

Outfitters for Ladies, Misses and Children. 
Commencement Dress Materials and Acces- 
sories — Gloves, Fans, Hosiery, Shoes, — receive 
our special attention. 

215 Fayetteville Street. 

STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES. 
Fruits, Vegetables and Country Pro- 
duce. The best of everything and at rock 
bottom price.-.. Special prices to schools and 
colleges. D T. JOHNSON & SONS. 

Phone 78. 163 Hargett St 

MISSES REESE & COMPANY, 

Millinery. 



Location Central for the Carolinas. 

Climate Wealthy and Salubrious. 

St, Mary's School, 

RALEIGH, N, C, 

(for girls and young women). 



64th ANNUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER 21, 1905. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS, 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 25, 1906. 



1. THE COLLEGE, 

„ „, , . % TEE MUSIC SCHOOL. 

St. Alary s 

~ H^Hni <f 3; THE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 
offers instruction in these \ -:^^. y~.^y". ■/:".->■ : y :-^ 

Departments: i £ THE AMI SCHOOL. . 

{ 5. THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 



In 1905-06 are enrolled 225 students from- 13 Dioceses, 

Twenty-five Members in. the Faculty. 

Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department Much Equipment New. Twenty-eight 
Pianos. Nsw Miller Grand Piano Just Added. .Sj; 

Special attention to the Social and Christian Side of Education without slight 
totKesch/^sii&tii^imng: ^^r-| 

For Catalogue and other information address 

Rev. McNeely DuBose, B. &, B. D. 

^fl^^H RECTOR. 




I 



flDas, 1906 



*■ 



St.TIBary's Abuse 




IRaleiob, IFt C 



SPRING NUMBER. 



Vol. X. May, 1906. No. 10. 



Commencement Exercises. 



Sunday, May 27: 

11.00 a. m., Baccalaureate Sermon, by Rev. Richard W. Hogue, of St. James' 
Church, Wilmington, N. G. 

Monday, May 28 : 

4:00 — 0:00 p. m., Annual Exhibit of the Art Department. 
8:15 p. m., Elocution Evening. 

Tuesday, May 29 : 

10:00 a. m., Class Day Exercises. 

3:30 p. m., Alumnae Exercises. 

8:15 p. m., Rector's Reception in Honor of Seniors. 

Wednesday, May 30: 

3:30 p. m.. Annual Meeting of the Trustees. 
8:15 p. m., Annual Concert. 

Thursday, May 31: 

10:30 a. m., Graduation Exercises. 

The Closing Days of the Session : A Prospect. 

This concluding number of the Muse will reach its readers in the 
week when all at St. Mary's have their attention centered on the events 
of commencement just ahead. The Commencement program is given 
above. Tt is not proposed to enter into any discussion of any of the 
events at this time; the June number of the Muse is Commencement 
Number and will note what is to be noted, but it may be interesting to 
all those who are thinking of St, Mary's in the concluding days of the 
school year, and are with the members of the class, and the other girls r 
either in person or spirit, to have some preliminary information about 
some of the scenes in prospect. 



The St. Mart's Muse. 



Examinations will have occupied the minds of all in the pre-com- 
mencement week, broken though it will be by Thursday being the great 
feast of the Ascension and a holy day at St. Mary's, and by Saturday 
evening the actual work of the year will be over and five days of recre- 
ation will be ahead, days which we hope will be full of pleasure for girls 
and visitors alike, and the recollection of which, capping the memories 
of the year, will long be a pleasure to every one. 

The Commencement Season will begin on Sunday morning with a 
celebration of the Holy Communion in the Chapel at half-past seven, 
the last Communion of the year. The visiting clergy will assist the 
Rector. 

At the eleven o'clock service the Commencement Sermon is preached. 
There is a peculiar fitness in having Mr. Hogue deliver this sermon, 
for from Wilmington, from St. James' and St. John's parishes, there 
has been a larger group of girls at St. Mary's, both last year and this, 
than from any other point in St. Mary's field. The Commencement 
Sermon, too, will recall the masterful address of Bishop Gaylor in 1903, 
the long awaited and well remembered visit of Bishop Bratton in 1904, 
when he came back to St. Mary's for the one visit he has been able to 
find time to pay us since entering upon his bishopric, and the earnest 
and friendly words of Dr. Mies at the last Commencement. 

The afternoon service, at 5 :30, is just the usual service but it has 
come to be looked upon also as a special service for the alumnae, and it is 
hoped that as many of the alumnae as are within reach will try to be 

present. 

Monday morning will be devoted to putting the finishing touches on 
the school work and making a farewell "Monday shopping trip," prop- 
erly chaperoned, of course. In the afternoon the Art Department will 
more than "do itself proud." The department has been unusually 
large this session and while the fact that the majority of the pupils are 
not far advanced will affect the exhibit, the genuinely aroused interest 
of all has led to the production of most creditable work which speaks 
volumes for the ability and energy with which Miss Fenner has been 
directing the department. Miss Fenner spent a part of last summer 
in New York at Pratt Institute making a special study of the new effects 



The St. Maky's Muse. 



in stenciling, and the display of the pupils' work in this line forms an 
important part of the exhibit. The Studio will be open to visitors in the 
afternoon and after the recital in the evening. 

Monday night the pupils of the Elocution Department will give their 
Commencement Recital. This department has been steadily increasing 
in interest and in numbers the past year, and at this Commencement the 
first Certificate in Expression will be awarded to Miss Rowena Lee, of 
Clinton. 

Tuesday is Class Day and Alumnae Day. In the forenoon the Class 
of 1906 will have their final celebration as a class. They are fewer 
in number than the graduates of 1904 or 1905, but they do not feel 
inferior to their sisters in any other way. The members of the class are 

The Class of 1906. 

Ruth Foster St. Simon's Mills, Ga. 

' Jane Iredell Green Wilmington. 

Annie Eliza. Koonce Richlands. 

Mary Thornton Lassiter Hertford. 

Margaret Devereux Mackay Raleigh. 

Harriet Elizabeth Ruff Ridgeway, S. C 

Annie Whitner Sloan Columbia, S. C. 

Sara Gertrude Sullivan Savannah, Ga. 

Frances Elizabeth Woolf Demopolis, Ala. 

"Bettie" Woolf is the Class President, "Ret" Ruff is the Prophet, 
Margaret Mackay is the Poet, and Annie Sloan the Historian, and 
these "dignitaries" as well as the "plain members" will be in evidence 
at the Class Day Exercises. 

In the late afternoon the Alumnae Association will gather in the 
Studio for its annual session. The members present will extend a warm 
welcome to the Class of 1906, and important business will be trans- 
acted. 

At night the Rector and Mrs. DuBose will as usual give a reception 
in the Main Building in honor of the Class and to the Alumnae, Trus- 
tees, Faculty and Commencement guests ; while the girls will enjoy the 
usual "feast" down-stairs. 

Wednesday morning will come the final class-meetings and meetings 
of the school organizations and the final informal celebration of the 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



year end. In the afternoon the Trustees will hold their annual session, 
and at night the grand final concert of the Music Department will be 
the attraction. 

Thursday morning — the grand climax. As usual the first part of 
the exercises will be held in the parlor, where the Salutatory and Valedic- 
tory will be said and the Class Essay read. Then, after the procession 
to the Chapel will follow the service where the Bishop will deliver his 
address to the graduates and the honors of the year will be read. At 
this service the first award of the Charles M. Mies Medal for General 
Scholarship will be awarded and the coveted distinction of the Honor 

Roll announced. 

Changes in the Faculty. 

The Commencement will have as always a tone of sadness in it, for 
in addition to the passing of the graduates and certificate girls out from 
our little world into the big world outside, there will be others who are 
bidding good-bye to the St. Mary's we all have known so intimately. 
There are again changes among the teachers, and it will be with genuine 
regret that, we part with some of those who have been closest to us and 
won a warm place in our respect and affection. 

Mr. Sanborn will give up the direction of the Music Department at 
the close of this session and with Mrs. Sanborn and the Misses Sanborn 
will go to their new home in Buena Vista, Va. They have been looking 
forward to the time when they could do this for several years, and while 
they will teach again later it is their purpose at present to enjoy a well- 
earned rest. Mr. Alvin W. Vincent, now of New Wilmington, Pa., 
will take up the duties which Mr. Sanborn lays down, and Mrs. Vincent 
will take Mrs. Sanborn's place in Vocal teaching. 

The academic faculty will next session be without the services of Miss 
Shipp in Mathematics, Miss Masch in Modern Language, and Misses 
Meares and Pittenger in the Preparatory work. Miss Shipp was no 
stranger to St. Mary's when she returned to the school two years ago 
in the English Department. She was here as a school girl and later 
for several years was in charge of the Mathematics. It is with deepest 
regret that we see her leave and we wish her the continued success that 
will be hers in her new field. Miss Masch has been with us only one 
year, but in that year has made many friends who will miss her. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Miss Meares, after graduating at St. Mary's in 1903, taking a year 
at Chapel Hill and teaching at St. Paul, Beaufort, has done a very suc- 
cessful year's work on the familiar scenes of her school days, but pro- 
poses next year to rest. 

Miss Pittenger, pupil, graduate and former teacher of St. Mary's 
goes because of a re-adjustment of work which eliminates the depart- 
ment of which she has had charge. Though, on account of her work 
being with the younger pupils and apart from the higher classes, we do 
not know her as well as the teachers who are nearer to us, we have 
learned to appreciate her worth, and wish her prosperity wherever she 
decides to teach. 

In addition, Mrs. Seay, the Mrs. Seay ever ready to lend a helping 
hand, ever present help in time of trouble, has concluded that she has 
had enough of school-life for the present, and now, with the completion 
of Leonore's Art Course at St. Mary's, intends to try a more quiet life 
for a. while in Charlotte. How are we going to get along without her, 
and how will the housekeeper's room seem with anyone else occupy- 
ing it ? 

In the place of those who go, faces now unfamiliar will be seen among 
us in September with one exception, and that too notable a one for us 
to wait until the June number brings the fit time for the introduction 
of the new. After twenty years of the most faithful and effective service 
in the city schools of Raleigh, first as teacher, then principal of the Wiley 
School, and the past year as assistant in the High School, Miss Eliza 
Pool in September will enter the faculty of St. Mary's taking charge 
of the work in French. Miss Pool is too well known in Raleigh to need 
any introduction to those who know the city or St, Mary's, and we feel 
that we have every reason for rejoicing that she feels able at this time 
to come to us and give us the advantage of the training with which she 
has so greatly blessed the girls and boys of Raleigh for so many years. 

Miss Smith, now of Memphis, Tenn., will take charge of the Mathe- 
matics ; Miss Spurlock, now of Nashville, of Science and elementary 
German, and Miss Spann, now of Asheville, of Preparatory Work, at 
the beginning of the new session, and we shall be glad to speak of them 
to the Muse readers in the next number. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



STORIETTES. 



The BlacK Walnut Stairway. 

Our earliest impressions are usually our most vivid ones; often we 
find that very old people remember distinctly the happenings and habi- 
tations of early childhood, while those of after-life are completely for- 
gotten. Perhaps this accounts, in a measure, for the profound admira- 
tion which I have always had for the big black walnut stairway in my 
grandfather's house. I am sure, however, that the stairway was in itself 
worthy of admiration. 

My grandfather died when I was nine years old, and, as is often the 
case, the family was broken up and the house sold. As I have never 
been in the house since, I am still undeceived in my baby impressions 
of the big walnut stairway. Big, however, does not convey the idea; 
the stairway was huge, and when you were up at the top you felt in 
another world from what you did at the bottom. You were up in the 
sky at the top, and you looked down, clown, down on the bronze Egyptian 
lady, who stood on the table in the hall holding an urn with a palm 
growing in it. The table was made of heavy dark oak and four one- 
footed dragons formed its legs and supported its top with their heads 
and wings. "When you were at the top of the stairs and looked far down 
on the dragon table with the bronze lady on it, the lady smiled sweetly 
and intently at her palm, but the dragons looked away up at you and 
rolled their eyes, yes really they did, and smoke came out of their nos- 
trils. 

It was very light up at the top of the stairs for you were almost to 
the skylight. The skylight was a big square and was made of beauti- 
fully shaped colored pieces. "Grown-up folks" thought that they were 
glass, but I will tell you a secret, they were really precious stones, for 
that was where the fairies came from. They jumped down from the 
skylight and tumbled right into the soft, furry red rug at the top of the 
stairs and did not get hurt one bit. "Grown-up folks" did not know it, 
but the stairs weren't really stairs, they were really the fairies' palace 
with a hundred rooms, really, truly, for each step was a room, a ball 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



room so smooth and slippery that only fairies could dance on it. Some- 
times you just sat right down and slid from the very top clear to the 
bottom. 

At the bottom the stairs began to curve and the steps got a whole lot 
larger, and these big steps were the court rooms of the palace. Almost 
at the very bottom where the steps were the biggest was a dark, dark 
corner and there you put your dolls to sleep, for there was plenty of 
room for the people going up and down stairs, and the dolls were not in 
the way. It was not as light at the bottom of the stairs as it was at the 
top, for the hall was big and dark, and then it was so far away from the 
skylight, Down at the very bottom of the stairs was the black dark 
"Under-the-stairs" corner where you could have stood and touched the 
ceiling if you had wanted to, but you did not want to, for a big black 
goblin lived in the dark corner there. 

The most wonderful part of the stairs was the railing, "Grown-up 
folks" called it, but it was really the glass river which the fairies skated 
on. It was an awfully broad river, for you couldn't get your two hands 
half way around it. It was miles long too, and sometimes when nobody 
was around you climbed onto the railing and slid clear down to the 
very bottom, and you went so fast that you just had to hold your breath 
and in a minute you came bump into the post at the bottom. Then you 
climbed on top of the post and were bigger than grandfather. 

The people who bought the house had long ceased to care for fairies 
or beautiful storways, and the only beauty which they could see was in 
dollars and cents. The house was very large and en a fashionable street, 
and I am told that they took out the beautiful stairway in order to run 
a partition through the center of the house so that it could be rented to 
two families instead of to one. Helen Katherhste Liddell. 



The Planting of the Class Tree. 

(A true story of the State Normal College.) 
The following announcement was read out in Chapel on Friday morn- 
ing: "The Class of 1907 will plant its Class Tree at eight-thirty to- 
night. Every one is invited." This was the Sophomore Class. The 
Freshman Class had planted its tree the day before at sunrise (and had 
not invited the Sophomores nor even let them know anything about it) 



8 The St. Mary's Muse. 



and we were all anxious to see how much the Sophomores' exercises 
would outshine those of the Freshmen. 

At eight- fifteen the campus around the tree was crowded with stu- 
dents, faculty, and even a large number of townspeople. Not a Sopho- 
more was to be seen and the campus was dark except for what seemed 
to be a bonfire on the other side of the campus. We were getting impa- 
tient when one of the girls came up and asked us to stand back to one 
side of the tree. Just then we heard a bugle call. Ah, they must be 
coming at last. Yes ; here they come. Out from their hiding places on 
the other side of the campus, skipped — not Sophomores, but about sixty 
fairies who had decided that the campus should be their rendezvous that 
night. Each fairy carried high above her head a pine torch, which she 
had lighted at the bonfire, and by this light we could see their short, 
fluffy, white dresses, glittering with stars, and their flowing hair 
crowned with wreaths of white flowers. But hark ! there is the bugle 
again and here they come pell-mell across the campus toward the tree. 
They must be Sophomores after all, for they are singing "Come to- 
gether all ye Sophomores, let us plant to-night our tree." We stood 
spellbound watching them come through the trees and all doubt as to 
their being Sophomores fled when we heard the lady principal's excited 
voice, "Be careful, girls !" On they came to the tree, and when they 
had reached it they formed a huge '07 and, still holding the torches on 
high, they sang the class song. This done each one stuck her torch into 
the ground in front of her and, leaving them there, they marched slowly 
around the tree, each throwing a shovelful of dirt on the roots of the 
tree as she passed by to take her place on the other side. When all had 
assembled in a group by the tree we watched closely to see what they 
would do next, but before we had time to wonder we heard shouted 
from sixty throats the class yell : 

" Hannibal — cannibal. 
S-8-9 boom bah! 
1—9—0—7. 
Rah — rah — rah! " 

Then, quick as a flash, they were off in all directions and we were left 
alone with the tree and the torches, a flaming '07. 

Louise Hill. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



From A Serenader's Point of View. 

(Perhaps rather true than otherwise.) 

When first we appeared on the scene we thought it was a seasonable 
hour for a serenade, But the young ladies in question held a different 
opinion it seems. "Did you all come up to supper/' demanded a sweetly 
sarcastic voice; and we beat a retreat into the depths of the darkness. 
Now we know all about serenading in general, as anyone who heard our 
prelude, ''Teasing," could testify ; but this was our first attempt in the 
immediate vicinity of St. Mary's, so while we were at it we thought 
we'd investigate, as far as possible, the workings of a female institute. 
Well, we strolled around and struck a match or two and were pushing 
our explorations toward the rear of the buildings, when the preface to 
the interruption came. Holy smoke! That interruption: 

"Who's there ?" came from above, and we bravely forbore any reply. 
Again the challenge came. Again we were dumb. And then — right 
down on us poor, innocent, unoffending, defenceless boys a pistol was 
fired. It hit everyone of us. Oh, you needn't tell me it was shot in air. 
I never want to be hit any harder. Needless to say we moved off. We 
weren't scared, but it wasn't any use to stand there and die a dozen 
deaths. We wouldn't have run but for the fact that we didn't want to 
be recognized and somehow distance did seem to lend enchantment. So 
we just bolted and I'd be willing to swear we knocked down every tree 
in the grove. But they didn't stop us ; we just rolled over them. Cannon 
balls couldn't have caught us. 

You might think this was enough — but no — we were just slowing 
up and thinking about going back and finishing our serenade maybe, 
when two demons of the night, yelling, "Hi there !" burst upon us. This 
was too much for our already exhausted bodies. We made a last effort, 
escaped our pursuers, and found ourselves once more on the blessed 
streets of town. 

No more of St. Mary's warm receptions for us, thank you ! 

Helen Strange. 



10 The St. Mary's Muse. 

p'orget-rne-not. 



There blooms a little flower 

Out in the meadow there; 
Its eye is like the heavens, 

So very blue and fair. 

It knows not how to talk much, 

And all it says, I wot, 
Is always just the same thing — 

It is: Forget-me-not. 

It's face brings back sweet mem'ries- 
Of pain, there's not a jot — 

To passers-by 'tis always 
The same: Forget-me-not. 

And then in after life, dear, 
They think of that sweet spot, 

How there upon the meadow 
It smiled: Forget-me-not. 



Louise Hill, '08. 



SCHOOL ME^ 



The Inter-Society Debate 

The fifth annual debate between the literary societies of the school, 
Sigma Lambda and Epsilon Alpha Pi, took place in the parlor on the 
evening of Saturday, April 21. The question was : "Kesolved, that the 
enormous growth of the modern novel is a disadvantage to education." 
Sigma Lambda, in the person of its debaters, Jane Iredell Green, '06, 
and Margaret Mackay, '06, upheld the affirmative, while Bettie Woolf, 
'06, and Lillian Farmer, '07, for the Epsilon Alpha Pi took the nega- 
tive view. The judges were Hon. Bryan Grimes, Secretary of State, 
Prof. E. B. Paine of A. and M. College and Dr. V. E. Turner. Vir- 
ginia Bailey, President of Sigma Lambda, presided, while the president 
of Epsilon Alpha Pi, Gertrude Sullivan, as is customary, was seated 
with her. Emma Barnwell, of the E. A. P., was Secretary. 

The interest in the debate was as intense as usual, and the debate 
itself well up to the standard. The result makes the present series stand 



The St. Maky's Muse. 11 



Sigma Lambda, three; E. A. P., two; and the increasing closeness will 
lead to increased interest another year. 

Elizabeth Waddill tells the story as follows : 

For two or three days before the great inter-society debate everybody 
was very much excited, and the old rose and sage or the purple and 
gray ribbons were flying everywhere. The Sigma Lambdas were sure 
that they were going to win and kept reminding us how many times they 
had done so before, while we E. A. P.'s were wishing with all our hearts 
that we might be the victorious side this year. 

Saturday night, the time appointed for the debate, came at last, and 
at eight o'clock we walked into the parlor and seated ourselves on one 
side of the room, while the Sigma Lambdas took possession of the other. 
The parlor was decorated with bamboo and the colors of the two societies, 
and on the platform were the desks for the two presidents, with the 
chairs and tables for the debaters. After we had been waiting for what 
seemed to us a long time the debaters and president came on the plat- 
form and the meeting was called to order. Then the debate began, 
and from that time on our interest never flagged. All of the papers 
were so good that it was hard to tell which was the best. The last paper 
on our side was fine though and we secretly thought that we had won. 
Ours was the negative side of the question, consequently we had the 
last retort, and that too was excellent. The judges were Mr. Bryan 
Grimes, Dr. Turner and Dr. Payne, and as they sat listening to the de- 
bates we wondered if they were taking notes on each one. When the 
last word had been spoken and the last debater had sat down the judges 
walked out of the room in a solemn procession to make their decision, 
and we waited almost breathlessly for them to return. When the chair- 
man, Mr. Grimes, did come back, the room became perfectly still, and 
all eyes were fixed on him. After making some complimentary remarks 
about all the papers he at last announced that the judges' decision was 
in favor of the negative, and then all of the E. A. P.'s and their friends 
nearly went wild. I am afraid there was not much left of the poor 
debaters, after we finished congratulating them, but of course, after such 
a triumph they must have expected a good deal of attention. 



12 Tile St. Mary's Muse. 



THE CERTIFICATE RECITALS. 

On Monday evening, April 30th, the first of the Certificate Recitals 
was given by Miss Virginia E. Bailey, of Wilmington, pupil of Miss 
Dowd, Miss Serena Bailey, of Palatka, Fla., pupil of Miss Pixley, and 
Miss May Lee Montague, of Raleigh, vocal pupil of Mrs. Sanborn. A 
very large number of friends from the city attended the recital, and 
these with the St. Mary's girls greatly enjoyed the rendition of the fol- 
lowing program : 

Prelude, from Suite Whiting 

Scotch Poem McDowell 

Virginia Empie Bailey. 

Gavotte Dreyschock 

Serena Cobia Bailey. 

Arioso, from La Mort de Jeanne d'Arc Bamberg 

May Lee Montague. 

Nocturne in F '. Schumann 

Virginia Empie Bailey. 

Arabesque Schumann 

Serena Cobia Bailey. 

A Norwegian Plaint, with Violin Obligate Loomis 

Shoogy Shoo Mayhew 

May Lee Montague. 

Impromptu in C sharp minor Reinhold 

Virginia Empie Bailey. 

Prelude in B flat Chopin 

Polonaise in C sharp minor Chopin 

Serena Cobia Bailey. 

T. 



The second certificate recital in the Music Department of St. Mary's 
School took place Thursday evening, May 8th, in the tastefully decor- 
ated parlor. Miss Myrtle Disosway gave the Leschetizky Mazurka with 
clear phrasing and rythmic movement, following it with the beautiful 
transcription of Jensen's song, ''Murmuring Zephyrs" and Meyer-rlel- 
mund's Maiden's Song, in which she appeared her best. 

Miss Ruth Foster has received all her vocal training from Mrs. San- 
born at St. Mary's, and her work showed good teaching and conscientious 
work. The Aria from Tl Trovatore was rendered with clear enunciation 



The St. Maey's Muse. 13 



and understanding, and Miss Foster's clear, sweet voice showed to ad- 
vantage in the modern songs. 

Miss Lina deRosset evinced unusual musical talent and the singing 
quality of her touch showed to advantage in the Godard ''Barcarolle." 
The Schuett Valse was naive and delightful in its capriciousness, and 
the Schubert Impromptu ended brilliantly a most pleasing program. 

The pianists are both pupils of Miss Dowd and reflect great credit 
upon her. 

The program was: 

Mazurka Leschetizky 

Murmuring Zephyrs Jensen 

Maiden's Song Meyer-Helmund 

Myrtle Louise Disosway. 

Recitative and Aria from Trovatore, "Oft Does the Weary Heart" Verdi 

Ruth Foster. 

Bacarolle Godard 

Valse Mignonne Schuett 

Caroline Nelson DeRosset. 

In Thy Dreams Buck 

In the Twilight Trotere 

Ruth Foster. 

Impromptu Schubert 

. Caroline Nelson DeRosset. 

Px. 



The third and last of the session's certificate recitals was given on 
the evening of Monday, May 14th. It was a novelty for St. Mary's in 
two respects, for it was the first certificate recital in Expression given 
at St. Mary's and introduced to the public the St. Mary's String Club 
who assisted Miss Rowena Lee. 

The stage was very daintily and effectively decorated in white and 
green (bamboo) and the recital was a success in every way. Miss 
Lee's rendition of her selections was enthusiastically received, and her 
work showed throughout the effective training of Miss Cribbs. She 
won especial praise in "Laureame, Marble Dream," in which she ap- 
peared in Greek costume. The debut of the String Club had been eag- 
erly awaited by all who have come to understand the quality of Miss 



14 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Hull's training, and it was no disappointment, The only complaint 
ever made of what Miss Hull offers is the greedy one of "more, more, 
more." The Clnb is made up of Miss Hull and Roberta Taylor, Guitar ; 
Margaret "Wilson and Margaret DuBose, Violin ; and Miss Meares, 
Christine Klingensmith, Sue Prince and Blandina Springs, Mandolin. 
The program was : 

Richard Harding Davis Sketch, VanBibber 

Rowena Lee. 

Weayer Waltz, "Sweet Memories" 

St. Mary's String Club. 

Bulwer-Lytton • Cutting from "Last Days of Pompeii" 

Rowena Lee. 

Weaver "Piccaninnies' Jubilee" 

St. Mary's String Club. 

Emma Dunning Banks Laureame, Marble Dream 

(with accompaniment, "Angel's Serenade") 
Rowena Lee. 



:H . 



Subscription, One Year. = = = = One Dollar. 

Single Copies, = = = = = Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St Mary's School, Raleigh 
N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumnae, under the editorial management of the 
Senior Class. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 

Correspondence from friends solicited. raleigh n. c. 



Editorial Board. 

Ruth Foster, '06, Editor-in-Chief. Jane Iredell Green, '06, Business Manager. 

Francis E. Woolp, '06. Margaret Mackay, '06. Lillian Farmer, '07. 

Literary Department. 
Mary T. Lassiter, '06. Gertrude Sullivan, '06. 



EDITORIAL. 



With this number the Muse completes the second year of its exist- 
ence since its revival, and the Class of 1906, as sponsors for the publica- 
tion, says farewell to its readers. 

It is not a pleasant task this saying farewell, but the time for it comes 
to us all and it only remains for us when the time comes to say it as 
gracefully as possible. In laying down the responsibilities of editorship 
we show no more than ordinary gratitude when we express our hearty 
thanks to the student-body and to the alumnae for the support they 
have given us in the Muse, most particularly to those whose contribu- 
tions have appeared from month to month in its pages. And to the 
Class of 1907 and those others who shall guide the Muse, we trust, to 
even better things than we have been able to attain, we give our heartiest 
good wishes. We shall try as alumnae to support thern in their work, 
realizing how thankless a task after all that work is, and assure them 
of our real sympathy. 

And now farewell ! 



At length the 1906 annual is ready. We think it a very creditable 
production and hope that will be the general impression. With its flex- 
ible cover of dark blue ooze, stamped in gold, with the name and the 



16 The St. Mary's Muse. 

school seal, it has a very attractive exterior, and the faces on the inside 
would surely make it attractive even if it were not otherwise, and we 
hope it is. The annual isn't literary ; it doesn't pretend to be, but it 
affords a fairly good photograph of the year, its persons and events, and 
won't be a bad thing to have in future years as a memory refresher. 



It is with a feeling of rejoicing that we have seen ground broken for 
the new Auditorium building. Immediately east of the Art Building 
it will have a good location and is reported to be a very attractive build- 
ing in every way. Next Commencement we trust it will be a real real- 
ity. Now for a new dormitory ! 



We are not sure just how fully we approve the innovation which will 
be made this Commencement in the matter of prizes. We greatly ap- 
preciate the good will and generosity which inspired Dr. Niles last year 
to offer his medal for General Scholarship, and realize that he hoped 
that it would inspire an increased interest in the getting of the best 
from our school course, but there is much to be said in favor of the good 
old St. Mary's custom of no reward but the sense of duty well-done, and 
no announcement but the simple honorable one of the hard-earned 
Honor Roll. We shall watch developments carefully. 



SCHOOL NOTES 



Mr. Hodgson has just been with us for his spring visit. He is feeling 
quite well again and is as accommodating as ever. 

Mildred Smith, Martha Ferebee and Mary Cooper entertained at a 
picnic on the Neuse river on Easter Monday. The guests were Miss 
Cribbs, Gertrude Sullivan, Josephine Boylan, Lottie Sharpe, Jennie 
Morris and Bettie Woolf. 

The annual. convention of the Kappa Delta Fraternity was held in 
Charlotte on the 16th and 17th of April. The Phi Delta Chapter at 
St. Mary's was represented by Christine Klingensmith, Maria Webb, 
Annie Wells, Katherine Boylan and Bhmdina Springs. 



The St. Mary's Muse. IT 



Mr. DuBose has been away from the school a good part of the past 
month in attendance at Diocesan Councils. The South Carolina Council 
met in Anderson on May 9th, and the East Carolina Council in New 
Bern on the 15th. Mr. DuBose while in South Carolina also stopped 
at Greenville and Greenwood. 

We have been happy in having visits from several of our last year 
girls the past month. Ellen Gibson, '05, and Ohla Brown, of Concord, 
after visiting friends and attending the Easter dance at Chapel Hill, 
came over to the school and spent a week with their old friends here. 
And Jennie Murchison, of Wilmington, lent us a few days of her pres- 
ence a little later. All the girls are looking well and report a "glorious 
time." 

The Damrosch Orchestra Concert given at the opera house on April 
23, under the local management of Mr. Wade Brown, was a great suc- 
cess. A large party of St. Mary's girls and nearly all the teachers were 
present and. enjoyed the concert thoroughly from start to finish. The 
opportunities to hear Sousa, Bispham and Damrosch all in the one sea- 
son is a treat the like of which St, Mary's girls and Raleigh have not 
enjoyed for many a year. 

Since the last Muse appeared we have been honored by two very wel- 
come guests in the year's lecture course. On March 24, Prof. Carlyle, of 
Wake Forest came over and gave his lecture on "Horace, the Man and 
the Poet," I can't say that any of us who do not study Latin were 
inspired quite to the point of taking it up, but we all, Latin or no Latin, 
enjoyed the lecture very much, and you should have seen the M Latin 
Class members beaming at their superior knowledge of the quotations 
in Latin. 

April 21 President Poteat, of Wake Forest, was with us. He talked 
on "Dante and his Influence" and interested every one. He gave his 
address early in the evening in order that we might enjoy the U. 1ST. C. 
Glee Club concert at Raney Llall later, and then we weren't given the 
opportunity to enjoy it, but — 

Another base-ball season with all its brief periods of frenzied "root- 
ing" — we know not for what — and of souvenir pennant collecting — we 
know not from whom ( ?) — of vari-colored ribbons and much-divided 



18 The St. Mary's Muse. 



cheering, always winding up with united applause for U A. and M." when 
they happen around for one of their torchlight celebrations "in the 
gloaming"- — is over. Rah ! Carolina ! Rah ! South Carolina ! Rah ! Vir- 
ginia ! Rah! Georgia ! Rah ! Rah ! A. and M. ! They all have our good 
wishes all the time, and so do the others whose followers are not so num- 
erous among us. Rah! 

The Sophomore and Freshman Spelling Match. 



In the course this year the Sophomores and the Freshmen have had 
an hour every Tuesday morning devoted to spelling. Last Tuesday 
instead of having the usual recitation the two classes met in the Library 
and had a spelling match. Eight girls were selected from each class, 
these girls having made the highest marks on a test which the classes 
had i stood a week or two before. This was one time when some of us 
weren't so very glad we hadn't made the best marks. The Library was 
arranged so that the audience sat in the back and the "spellers" sat, 
facing each other, in the front. Miss Thomas, the Sophomore honorary 
member, kept time ; Ella Croft and Anne Miller kept score, and Mr. 
Cruikshank read the words, which were to be spelled, first one side then 
the other, out of a large dictionary, the very looks of which made the 
"Eights" tremble. 

There were two periods of ten minutes each, with an intermission of 
five minutes. At the end of the first period the Freshmen were ahead 
and began a little too soon to "crow" over the Sophomores, who were 
calming their own fears by saying "You just wait." The Freshmen did 
seem to be waiting for something by the middle of the second period, as 
the Sophomore Eight left them some distance behind and ended by win- 
ning, the score being 214 to 203. 

Cheer up, Freshmen ; next year it will be your turn to be the winning 
Sophs. M. E., Soph. 

Seniors Entertained by Ruth poster and Mary Lassiter. 



On the 30th of April the Senior Class and Certificate Pupils were 
delightfully entertained by Mary Lassiter and Ruth Foster. When we 
had all been introduced to each other we were given pretty little leaflets 
with a picture of a dignified Senior on the back, but when we opened 



The St. Mary's Muse. 19 



them we found they were absolutely blank— not even a question to be 
answered ! worse than that we were told we must write a story about a 
"Sweet Girl Graduate." After this had been finished all of the stories 
were given to Miss Thomas to read, of course most of them were love 
stories, but there were many kinds to choose from. Miss McKimmon's 
was chosen as the best, and she received a lovely St. Mary's pillow as a 
prize. Joe Boylan received the booby, an A. B. C. book, for composing 
a witty poem ( ?) on Bettie Woolf. 

Soon after the refreshments, strawberries and whipped cream, had 
been served the merry party broke up, feeling they were indebted to 
Misses Lassiter and Foster for a most enjoyable time. A. W. S. 



Annie Koonce's Reception. 



Annie Koonce entertained the Senior Class and Certificate Pupils 
at her aunt's home on Hillsboro street the first of the month. In spite 
of the rainy weather we spent a most pleasant evening. We were given 
a list of queries to be answered in the name of authors. Miss Thomas 
proved to be the best guesser and received a lovely white gauze fan for 
a prize. After this delightful refreshments were served — first a salad 
course and then ice cream and cake. This will be perhaps the last time 
we will meet this year, and although it was the last of the entertain- 
ments it was by no means the least. 



The Dramatic Club Play. 



The most attractive play that has been given at St, Mary's in some 
time was given there by the Dramatic Club on Saturday evening, the 
12th of May. The name of the play, "Men, Maids and Matchmakers," 
is in itself interesting, but the girls really acted their parts very well 
indeed, those deserving especial mention being Miss Jane Iredell Green 
as Miss Alice Marshall alias Mrs. Winthrop, Miss Josephine Boylan as 
Catherine Howard, Miss Emma Barnwell as Doctor ImhofT, and Chris- 
tine Klingensmith as Guy Richards. 



20 The St. Mary's Muse. 



In the first act all the characters are introduced, Mr. Vincent is given 
a lesson in proposing, and we learn that Guy Richards and Lillian 
Stuart have a rich "Aunt Selina" who refuses to leave them any money 
unless they become engaged. The next act brings Mrs. Winthrop (alias 
Miss Alice Walker) on a visit to her nephew and niece, and by the end 
of this act everybody's love affairs are woefully mixed up. Of course, 
though, in the end everything turns out all right. Even the queer old 
doctor and Sammie, the large ( ?) cat, are satisfied, while Lillian Stuart 
and Guy Richards actually confess they don't mind being engaged any 
more. 

This was the cast: 

Lillian Stuart Margaret Eldredge. 

Guy Richards Christine Klingensmith. 

Charlie Brewster (Guy's friend) Bettie Woolf. 

Dr. [mhoff Emma Barnwell. 

Roy Vincent Gertrude Sullivan. 

Alice Marshall alias Mrs. Winthrop Jane I. Green. 

Elizabeth Everett Jennie Morris. 

Catherine Howard Josephine Boylan. 

Sammie (a large cat) . 

Place — New York City. 




CUT OF THE NEW SMEDES MEMORIAL ALTAR. 

Courtesy of Harm Wangerin-Weickhardt Co., VVilwaukee. 



Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 



St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 

President, - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

(Mrs. M T Leak, Durham. 
Vice-Presidents, J Mrs. £, M - Pittenger, Raleigh, 
' l Mrs. h. P. Tucker, Raleigh, 

[Mrs.KatedeR Meares, Wilmington. 
Sec.-Treas., - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 



The Memorial Altar. 



Contributions are still corning in from the ever-loyal alumnae to the 
fund for the Smedes Memorial Altar. While the fund has now been 
made up, and it is hoped to have the altar in place at Commencement, 
these gifts are entirely acceptable and will be used for the purpose for 
which they are intended. The fact is recognized that the Memorial 
Altar has a deeper meaning for the alumnae of the past than for the 
girls of the present, and so while the gifts of the present school organi- 
zations were received in order that the altar might be speedily in place 
this money can be used with equal fitness in other needs of the Chapel 
while we should like to have as many as possible represented in the 
Altar which we hope will mark not only a step in the growth of St. 
Mary's but a new impulse to better things. 

We present in this number a cut of the new altar now on its way to 
us from Milwaukee. It will lend much to the appearance of the 
Chapel, which has been rendered more and more beautiful since its 
completion by the gifts of loving friends. 



Easter Season Weddings Among the Alumnae. 

There was the usual number of weddings this season on the advent 
of Easter and the coming of the Easter brightness, but they were even 
more than usually interesting to those of St. Mary's, for among them 
are counted several of girls who have had an important part in the life 
of St. Mary's in recent years, both during and after their school days, 
and some of them very close to the girls of now, for in the marriage of 



The St. Mary's Muse. 23 



Effie Fairlev the Class of 1905 launches its first bark on the matrimonial 



seas. 



The Muse extends to each and every one of the brides hearty best 
wishes in the name of their many friends at St. Mary's, and for St. 
Mary's as a living personality and loving Alma Mater, and to the lucky 
husbands sincere congratulations on their good fortune. 

VanLeuven — Emerson. 

The marriage of Miss Eleanor Chase Emerson and Mr. Cornelius 
VanLeuven was solemnized at half-past six on the evening of April iQth 
in St. John's church, Wilmington, Dr. Carmichael officiating. The 
ceremony was simple and unostentatious on account of the recent death 
of the bride's uncle (Mr. H. M. Emerson). Miss Elliott Emerson 
(also formerly of St. Mary's) was maid of honor. Miss Emerson is a 
daughter of Mr. T. M. Emerson, President of the Atlantic Coast Line 
Railroad, a first cousin of Miss Elise Emerson, this year at St, Mary's. 
Mr. VanLeuven is in business in Wilmington. 

VanBuren — Wright. 

At St. James' church, Wilmington, on Tuesday afternoon, April 

17th, Miss Caroline Laurens Wright was married to Mr. Arthur Van 

Buren. 

Pippen — Leach. 

On the same day at nine in the evening at St. x4dban's church, Little- 
ton, Miss Sallie Moore Leach was married to Mr. Joseph Powell Pippen. 

Wilkinson — Sturgeon. 

On Wednesday, April 18th, at the home of the bride's father at Apex, 
Miss Mary Boiling Sturgeon was married to Mr. Thomas F. Wilkinson. 
The wedding was very quiet on account of the recent death of Miss 
Sturgeon's mother. 

"Mary Sturgeon" is a little closer to the present day St. Mary's girl 
than some of the other brides whose school-mates have now drifted away 
from the scenes of their school days, and there are many still with us 
who remember well her prowess on the athletic field and how she led 
her basket-ball team to victory. And this too while she was "accomp- 
lishine- things" in her school work. 



24 The St. Mary's Muse. 



White — Bridgers. 

In Calvary church, Tarboro, on Wednesday evening, April 18, at 
eight o'clock, the marriage of Miss Laura Placide Bridgers, daughter 
of Col. John L. Bridgers, of Ililma, to the Rev. Robb White, of Greene 
County, Va., was celebrated. Bishop Cheshire officiated, assisted by 
the Rector, Mr. Harding. Miss Reba Bridgers (also ex-St. Mary's), 
was the maid of honor. Mr. White has been doing successful missionary 
work in the mountains of Virginia, but has recently accepted a call to 
;an important parish in Cambridge, Mass., and there, at North Cam- 
bridge, he and his bride will make their home. 

Manning — Lewis. 

We clip from the News and Observer of April 26th : 

The following wedding announcement was issued yesterday: 

"Dr. and Mrs. Richard Henry Lewis 

announce the marriage of their daughter, 

Martha Battle, 

to 

Dr. Isaac Hall Manning, 

on Wednesday, the twenty-fifth of April, 

one thousand, nine hundred and six, 

at Cloverdale, near Raleigh, 

North Carolina. 

The wedding was a quiet but lovely home event, and there were in attendance 
only intimate friends and relatives. At "Cloverdale,"' the suburban home of Dr. 
and Mrs. Lewis, the decorations in the room in which the wedding took place were 
in white and green, ferns, palms and smilax being used. The bay window before 
which the wedding took place was artistic in its decorations. 

There were no bridal attendants, and for the happy event the bride was gowned 
in white silk, her bouquet being of bride's roses. After the wedding refreshments 
were served, and later Dr. and Mrs. Manning left for Washington and points north, 
after which they will go to their future home in Chapel Hill. 

The bride is a charming and talented young woman, and is highly esteemed by a 
large circle of friends. Dr. Manning is the son of the late Hon. John Manning, of 
Chapel Hill, long Professor of Law at the University, and is the dean of the Medical 
Department at Chapel Hill of the University of North Carolina. 

There were in attendance at the wedding from out of the city. Dr. Kemp P. Battle. 
Sr., former President of the State University; Dr. H. V. Wilson, Dr. William DeB. 
McNider, of the State University: Dr. and Mrs. John Manning and daughter, Miss 
Mary Louise, of Durham; Miss Mary Manning and Misses Louise and Cantie Ven- 
able. of Chapel Hill: Mr. James Manning, of Durham : Mrs. B. S. Leak, of Durham; 



The St. Mary's Muse. 25 



Mrs. W. R. Webb, sister of the groom, of Bell Buckle, Tenn. ; Miss Mary Weldon 
Huske. of Fayetteville ; Mrs. Robert Miller, of Goldsboro; Messrs. Richard Lewis 
and Kemp Lewis, of Durham; Prof. Ivey Lewis, of Randoloh-Macon College, of 
Ashland, Va.. and Dr. George Thomas, of Wilmington. 

The labor of love that Dr. Lewis has been doing and is doing for St. 
Mary's as a member of the Board of Trustees and its Executive Com- 
mittee, and. the warm place in the hearts of so many friends at and oi 
St. Mary's made by Miss t Tattie' T in her school days and since, as an 
active member of the alumnae in whatever has been suggested for the 
progress of St. Mary's, makes this wedding of especial interest to us all. 

English — Fairley. 

Again, the wedding being of especial interest to the girls of the last 
four years, we clip from the News and Observer of May 1. 

Monroe, April 27.— There took place on Wednesday evening a lovely event when 
Mr. Nereus G. English and Miss Effie Fairley were married at the residence of the 
bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Fairley. 

There were a very large number of friends present and the decorations were 
lovely. In a bay window in the parlor was a beautiful arch of evergreens and 
snowball flowers, studded with wbite bells suspended beneath the arch a large bell 
of roses. Beneath the arch stood the happy couple, Rev. E. A. Owens, of Charlotte, 
Rev. J. L. Martin, rector of St. Paul's Episcopal Church, performed the ceremony. 

The bride entered with the maid of honor, her sister, Miss Kate Fairley, and the 
groom with the best man, Mr. J. C. Sikes, Masters Archie and Henry Fairley, and 
Misses Mary English and Beatrice Fairley were the ribbon-holders. Master Everett 
English was ring bearer. Miss Cornie Fairley played the wedding march, and just 
before the wedding Miss Ashe Gaddy sang a beautiful solo. Mr. John Fairley, Jr., 
gave the bride away, and she was dressed in white crepe de chine over white taffeta 
and carried a shower bouquet of bride's roses and maiden-hair ferns and lillies of 
the valley, her veil being caught up with orange blossoms. 

After the wedding, refreshments were served. Mr. and Mrs. English received 
many lovely presents, a room being almost full of cut glass, china, silver and furni- 
ture! Mr. English is a son of Mr. and Mrs. J. R. English, and is manager of the 
insurance department of the Loan and Trust Company, being a young man of fine 
business qualifications and fine character. Mrs. English is a graduate of St. Mary's 
School, of Raleigh, and is a cultured and popular young woman. 



26 The St. Mary's Muse. 



A Characteristic Letter. 



Troy, Ala., March 26, 1906. 

My Dear Mrs. Iredell : — On yesterday I received a letter from 
my sister, Mrs. Williamson, telling me of the memorial to be erected 
in the Chapel at dear old St, -Mary's in memory of the Drs. Smedes. 
She stated that many donations had been made by old students in differ- 
ent towns, and I desire to add my contribution to so beautiful a cause. 

I loved Dr. Smedes very much, a gentler, sweeter character never 
lived, I'm very sure. I never think of the little Chapel that a wonderful 
"treaty of peace," signed by Eliza Skinner and me, does not come be- 
fore me. We had had a girls' misunderstanding, and some of our 
friends took us out back of the Chapel, toward the Gales' house, and we 
made peace. I think the treaty stayed there written on the Chapel for 
many years. 

I hope you will have no trouble in raising the desired amount, and be- 
lieve you will not. 

With best wishes ever for the dear old school and love, I am most 
cordially 

Laura Montgomery Henderson. 

(Mrs. Chas. Henderson, Troy, Alabama.) 



Notes From Charlotte. 

(Delayed in publication.) 



Charlotte, March 30. 

Miss Alice Pearson, formerly a primary teacher at St. Mary's has 
been ill in St, Peter's hospital for several months. Her condition, 
though still serious is improved. 

Miss Hattie B. Or, ('97-98), is to be married in April to Mr. Chas. 
Allison, of Charlotte. They will make their home in Mayodan, where 
Mr. Allison is engaged in business. 

Miss Florence Thomas, ('04), has recently returned from an interest- 
ing visit to relatives in Georgia. She expects to go to ISTew Orleans for 
the coming Confederate Reunion. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 27 



Miss Alice Moore, of Charlotte, expects to attend St. Mary's in the 
fall as a "new girl." She is at present making use of a scholarship at 
the Presbyterian College here, which she won by her "first distinction" 

in the high school. 

Miss Kate Cheshire, who is doing mission work in Mayodan, spent a 
few days in the city in the interest of the Woman's Auxiliary. The 
meetings were most interesting, and several new members were en- 
rolled. (J. 0., '99.) 

Notes of interest to the Alumnae. 



It is very pleasant to be able to announce that Miss Anne Saunders, 
who has had such a serious time this winter with inflammatory rheuma- 
tism, is slowly but surely recovering. She hopes to be able to go to her 
brother's home in Durham early in May to convalesce further. Miss 
Anne's niece, Miss Laura Saunders, of Durham, has been with her 
during her illness. 

The condition of Dr. P. E. Hines, who suffered a stroke of paralysis 
in January, continues to improve. He is in full possession of his 
faculties tho' not yet able to be about. Mrs. Iredell has been with him 
since his attack. 

The competitive examination for the David R. Murchison Scholar- 
ship at St, Mary's was held in ten points in the Diocese of East Caro- 
lina, in which Diocese the holder of the scholarship must reside on the 
second and third of May. The result of the examination has not yet 
been announced. The scholarship is made vacant by the graduation 
this year of Miss Mary Lassiter, of Hertford, who won the first com- 
petitive examination three years ago. 






READ !— MARK, 1-ACT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is thfir loss, not ours. 



Established 1858 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 



JEWELERS 



RALEIGH, 



NORTH CAROLINA 



HAVE 



WHARTON & TYREE 

TO MAKE YOUR 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

REMEMBER IT PAYS TO GET THE BEST 



hjow They Sing it in Boston. 

Every one labors except our distinguished progenitor. 

He reposes in a recumbent position within our residence through the day, 

His pedal extremities idling upon the bronze of the steam radiator, 

Serenely engaged in extracting nebulous atmosphere from a tobacco receptacle of 

mundane matter. 
Our maternal mentor receives soiled linen for the purpose of cleansing it, 
And in this connection I should include filial Ann. 

Indeed, everybody is engaged in some variety of occupation in our domestic habitat — ■ 
Excluding, as primarily suggested, our distinguished progenitor. 

— Springfield Republican. 



ERRALL CO. 



Dry Goods 

OF ALL KINDS 




Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

^ADIKS FINE SHOES AMD SLIPPERS 



...Send to... 

ALFRED WILLIAMS & GO. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

BOOKS 



OF ALL KINDS 

SELECT LINE OF STATIONERY. 

Eastman's Kodaks and supplies. 
Office supplies. 



Advertisements. 



Hart-Ward Hardware Company 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Best of everything in Hardware. Satisfaction 

guaranteed or money refunded. All-right 

Cook Stoves, Celebrated Warm Air 

Heaters, the only perfect heater 

made. Write for prices. 



DARNELL & THOMAS, 
Pianos and Organs. 
Sheet music and small goods. 
Raleigh, N. C. 



KING'S GROCERY 

"The Little Store." 



W. C. STRONACH'S SOBS CO. 



GROCERS 



216 FAYETTEVILLE STREET 

KING'S UP-TO-DATE DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN. 
Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets. 

You'll find up-to-date Shoes at 

HUNTER BROS. & BREWER. 



Cooperative pooling. 

One day in the spring-time two young men were sauntering through the woods 
just outside of the college town along a path greatly in favor with the students. 
When they reached the little spring they stopped for a drink. They were about to 
proceed on their way when their eyes caught the glint of a small metal box lying 
close up under a jagged stone in the pool just below the spring. 

"What d'you suppose that is, Dick?" 

"Don't know, Billy. I'm going to fish it up and find out." 

The water in the pool was two or three feet deep; the stone proved to be heavier 
than it appeared, and it rested on one end of the metal box, which was partly 



THEBOYLAJt-FEftRCEGO. M.ROSENTHAL 

SCO. 



Dry Goods, Millinery, 
Tailored Costumes, 
Gloves, Hosiery, 
Handkerchiefs, 
Fancy Goods, 
Underwear. 



Mall orders filled intelligently and promptly. 



TAYBTTEVILLE AND SALISBURY STK. 

RALEIGH, K. C. 



GROCERS 



136 FAYETTEVILLE STREET 



Advertisements. 



FOR QUICK COOKING 
nothing exceeds the 

GAS RANGE 

ALWAYS READY. NO DIRT OR ASHES 

FOR LIGHT 

Use the best: THE WELS BACH LIG FIT 

STANDARD GAS AND ELECTRIC CO. 

124 Fayetteville St. 



YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 
121 Fayetteville Street. 

J. SCHWARTZ, 

RICHMOND MARKET. 

Meats of All Kinds, 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



sunken in the gravel of the pool. Considerable puffing and splashing and damage 
to clothing took place before the box was landed. 

The wood within the metal box was thus inscribed: 

"Have the kindness to replace me, without needless delay, in the nice, shiny metal 
box, and then carefully wedge us back under the big rock, so that we can catch the 
eye of the next fool freshman that happens along." 

Then ensued more puffing, more splashing, and further damage to the new spring 
suits, until everything was just as before. — Youth's Companion. 



THE SOUTHERN EDUCATIONAL BUREAU, 

RALEIGH, N, C. 

(Established, 1891.) 

Invites correspondence with Teachers and 
Schools. 

FULL INFORMATION FREE. 


THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

ADMITS WOMEN 

TO THE HIGHER CLASSES. 

Many valuable courses are offered by a large 
and efficient corps of instructors. 

Graduates of St. Mary's who wish to carry 
their studies further will do well to write for 
catalogue and information. 

Francis P. Venable, President, 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 


CHARLES W. BARRETT— Architect 

Special Work in Fine Colonial Architecture. 

Author of 

"Colonial Southern Homes." 

115% Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 


E. M. UZZELL & CO., 
PRINTERS AND BINDERS, 

ONLY HIGH GRADE WORK. 
RALEIGH, N. C. 


PENN MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. 

R. B. RANEY, General Agent, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


INSURE AGAINST LOSS BY FIRE. 

Best Companies Represented. 

Bonding Solicited 

THE MECHANICS DIME SAVINGS BANK 

Raleigh, N. C. 


GRIMES & VASS, 

Fire Insurance and Investments. 

Raleigh, N. C 


HELLER'S SHOE STORE. 
GYMNASIUM SHOES. 


OAK CITY STEAM LAUNDRY. 
Promptness and Neatness with all work. 


RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK. 
Capital $15,000 Surplus 825,000. Deposits over 
$600,000. Four per cent interest paid on deposits. 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON, 

COAL, WOOD AND ICE. 

122 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. 


Marshall & West, Props. 


POWELL & POWELL, 

COAL AND WOOD, 

107 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



SALVATORE DESIQ, 

Manufacturing Jeweler and Silversmith. 

1012 F. St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

On application will send anysrticlt selected. 
To St. Mary's, disci mnt of ten per cent. 



J. S. MacDONALD CO., Jewelers. 

Diamonds, Watches, Clocks, Silverware, 

Jewelry, Class Rings, Medals and 

Badges to order. 

2 14 N. Charles St. Baltimore, Md. 

WE WANT your patronage in everything in 
the Jewelry, Watch and Diamond line. We 
sell only the best goods and at most reason- 
able prices. We make all kinds of college, 
class and fraternity Jewelry. Our new cata- 
logue mailed FREE to any address. 

H. SlLYEETHOEN Co., 

917 Main St., Lynchburg, Va. 



ELLINGTON'S ART STORE, 
Raleigh, N. C. 
Everything in Art. 
Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs. 

For the most satisfactory work, 
Try HAYES for 

PHOTOGRAPHS. 

T. W. BLAKE, 

Rich Jewelry and Silverware. 

Repairing prompt ly done. 



JOLLY & WYNNE JEWELRY COMPANY, 
Wedding and Holiday presents. 
Fine Watch and Jewelry repairing. 



April First. 

The old master knew all about '-cribbing" as a schoolboy and had not forgotten 
the little tricks and dodges. One day during an examination the keen-eyed teacher 
observed one of his pupils take out his watch every minute or two. The pedagogue 
grew suspicious. Finally he strode slowly down the aisle and stopped in front of 
Willie's desk. "Let me see your watch," he commanded. 

"Yes, sir," was the meek reply. 

The teacher opened the front of the case. He looked somewhat sheepish when he 
read the single word, "Fooled." But he was a shrewd man. He was not to be 
thrown off the scent so easily. He opened the back of the case. Then he was satis- 
fled. There he read, '"Fooled again." — Tatler. 



A . D U G H I , 

RESTAURANT AND ICE CREAM PARLOR. 

Confections, Foreign and Domestic Fruits. 

CATERER. 

St. Mary's folks know and approve of Dughi. 



Good things always at „„„„ 

BRETSCH'S BAKERY. 

Buv ROYSTER'S Fine Candies. 



Private Dining and Banquet Halls at 

GIERSCH'S 216 Fayetteville St. 



CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

AT J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 

Leading Florists of North Carolina. 
Ralei gh, N. C. 

H. STEINMETZ. 

FLORIST. 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns and all kinds 
Raleigh.] of Plants. [Phone 113. 

RQBT. 5IMP8QN, Drugs ^i e fiSl', etc. 

JNO. P. HAYES, Photographer. 

Kodak work of all kinds. 



ANTICEPHALALG1NE cures quickly and 
Bafely Headache in all its forms. 



Advertisements. 



THE RALEIGH BANKING AND TRUST CO., 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Capital, 8225,000. Surplus and Profits, 8115,000. 

Chas. H Belvin, President. 

Chas. B. Johnson, Vice-President. 

F. H. Briggs, Cashier 

J. B. Timberlake, Teller and Ass't Cashier. 

Safe Deposit Boxes in Pireand Burglar Proof 
Vault for rent at moderate cost. Absolutely 
safe place for keeping valuables of all kinds. 



THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C— 

Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. "We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

If its furnishing the Home, Office, School or 

Hall, see us. 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 

Cor. Wilmington and Hargett Streets, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

HICKS' DRUG STORE 
Fob Toilet Requisites and Cold Drinks. 

W. B. MANN, 
All Phones. Groceries. 11 E. Hargett St. 

PESCUD'S PHARMACY, 
12 West Hargett St., Raleigh, N. C. 

WEATHERS & PERRY, 

Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 

117 Fayetteviile St., Raleigh, N. C. 

Don't forget to buy your Shoes of 

S. C. POOLE'S Shoe Store. 

PERRY & ROSENTHAL, Trust Bldg. 
Ladies' Fine Shoes. 

Dr. V. E. TURNER, 

Dentist. 

J. R. FERRALL & CO.— Grocers. 
Best of everything in our line. 
22 Fayetteviile Street. 

JOHN C. DREWRY. 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE.' 



The Citizens National Bank 

RALEIGH, N. C. 
Capital, $ 100,000.00 

Surplus, - - 100,000.00 

Deposits, - 1,000,000.00 

Personal Calls and Correspondence Invited 
J. G. Brown, Pres. H. E. Litchford, Cashier 

Our ECCLESIASTICAL ART Department is 
superbly equipped for the promptand proper 
execution of fine church work suchas Altars, 
Pulpits, Lecturns, Prayer Desks, Litany 
Desks, Rood Screens, Fonts, and similar 
furnishings. Write for special church fur- 
niture catalogue. 

HANN-WANGERIN-WEICKHARDT CO., 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

THE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY, 
Candy— China. 

Stationery— Bric-a-brac. 



Geo. marsh & co., 

Wholesale groceries, Produce, Fruit, 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



ELLINGTON LUMBER COMPaNY, 

All Sorts of Building Supplies, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



mm 



j 



i 



COFFEE 

^BESTGROCEPS^ 



Dr. RUSSELL G. SHERRILL, 

JDentist. 



HARDEN'S LIVERY 

Always Ready. 
ALL 'PHONES No. 79. 



STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES. 
Fruits, Vegetables and Country Pro- 
duce. The best of everything and at rock 
bottom prices. Special prices to schools and 
colleges. D T. JOHNSON & SONS 

Phone 78. 163 Hargett St 



Mi «KS REESE &. COMPANY, 



Advertisements. 



SCHOOL PROGRAM. 



April-May, 1906. 

April 30.— Monday evening, 8:30. First Certificate Recital: Misses Virginia Bailey 
and Serena Bailey, Piano; May Montague, Vocal. 

May 5. — Saturday evening, 7:30. Last Social Evening. 

May 10. — Thursday morning, 11:30. Exercises commemorating Memorial Day. 

Thursday evening, 8 : 30. Second Certificate Recital : Misses Disosway and 
deRosset, Piano; and Foster, Vocal. 

May 12.— Saturday evening, 8:00. Dramatic Club: "Men, Maids and Match- 
makers." 

May 14.— Monday evening, 8:15. Third Certificate Recital: Miss Rowena Lee, Ex- 
pression; assisted by the String Club. 

May 22, 23, 25, 26. — Term examinations in all departments. 

May 24. — Thursday. Ascension Day. Holy Day. Regular duties suspended. Ser- 
vices: 7:30, 11:00, 6:45. 

May 27. — Sunday. Commencement exercises begin. 



June 1. — Summer vacation begins. 
September 20. — Sixty-fourth session opens. 



SBABOARD 

AIR LINE RAILWAY 

PASSENGER DEPARTMENT 

Direct Line to All Points in the South, South-West. North and North-West . 

DOUBLE DAILY SERVICE BETWEEN Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, 
Washington, Norfolk, Richmond, Raleigh, Charlotte, Wilmington, Atlanta, 
Birmingham, Memphis, Chattanooga, Nashville, Montgomery, Mobile, New 
Orleans, Columbia, Savannah, Jacksonville, Tampa, and all Florida points. 

Two trains every day between New York, Washington, Norfolk-Portsmouth, and Atlanta, 
Birmingham, Memphis, Savannah and Jacksonville. Trains composed of Vestibule Day 
Coaches, Pullman Drawing Room Sleeping Cars, and the latest Cafe Dining Cars. Direct con- 
nections at Memphis and New Orleans for all points in Texas, California, Arkansas, Colorado 
and all Western points. Interchangeable Mileage Books good over 15,000 miles of road on 
Southern lines. . 

For time-tables, winter or summer booklets illustrative of the South and South-west, apply 
to Seaboard Passenger Representatives, or address 

C. H. GATTIS, C. B. RYAN, EDWARD F. COST, 

Traveling Passenger Agent, General Passenger Agent, Second Vice-President, 

Raleigh, N. C. Portsmouth, Va. Portsmouth, Va. 



Location Central for the Carolinas. 

Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 

St. Mary's School, 

RALEIGH, N. Q. 

(for girh and young women). 



65th ANNUAL SESSION BEGINS SEPTEMBER 20, 1906. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 24, 1907. 



St. Mary's 



1. THE COLLEGE. 

2. THE MUSIC SCHOOL. 

3. THE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 



offers instruction in these 

Departments: "/.£ THE ART SCHOOL. 



6: THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 



In 1905-06 we enrolled 215 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-five Members in the Faculty. 

Well Furnished, Progress/re Music Department Much Equipment New. Twenty-eight 
Pianos. Miller, Knabe and Stein way Grand Pianos. 

Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without slight 
to the Scholastic training. 

For Catalogue and other information address 

Rev. McNeely DuBose, B. S., B. D. 

RECTOR. 





St. Mary' s Mu«a 


14160 
v.10 


[ 


AUTHOR 


J 


TITLE 



14160 
v.10